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Air Cooled/Water Cooled engine Question


IHBOWEN

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I know how air and water cooled engines work, and know air cooled engines need air flowing over the fins on the cylinder and head for cooling. Alot of air cooled engines are stationary but still don't overheat even though there is no air flow. Remove the water from a water cooled engine and let it run and it overheats and will seize up. Both are a cylinder, piston and head. Maybe a dumb question but was just curious!!

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The air cooled engines that i have been around Onan's and Wisconsin's have a fan built into the flywheel that pulls the air across the cooling fins.The engines are surrounded by a sheet metal shroud that directs the incoming air. The death of these is not keeping the area between the shroud and fins clean,chaff and dirt clog the fins Especially when any oil leaks a present. Most of your small engines used on lawn mowers are the same basic design.

There are no dumb questions,only dumb answers and i am sure someone here knows a lot more than i do.

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Just rebuilt (1) cylinder on a Deutz 913, it dropped a valve and wrecked the cylinder head & piston. Most Deutz applications have a switch on the belt that drives cooling fan, if belt breaks it shuts down. They also use air director shields / panels that are pretty important for the proper air flow around each cylinder. If they are missing or the seals for them are poor it works the same as a clogged radiator.

This unit is for irrigation pump and also has a "head temperature switch" in number (1) cylinder which just happens to be the rear cylinder at flywheel end of engine. I'am NOT much of a Deutz engine fan, time consuming to build. 

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Same thing with old snowmobile development first ones were free air and temps needed to be cooler and machine moving, then came fan cooled and then went to liquid cooling, as much as I like history and nostalgia liquid cooling was really a big step forward in power and temperature stability.

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Air cooled engines also run a richer fuel mixture, at least in 2 strokes.

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The incoming combustion air is what cools a gas turbine engine so it needs no external cooling fans.  On a  ship, I was on we had a helicopter on board with twin 1500 hundred HP JP5 fueled  turbine engines, I spent a lot of time around the crew-chief, "why doesn't it overheat when it is on deck", was one of my first questions to him. I was all set when I went to my first all turbine engine USN ship, because of all the dumb questions I ask about airplane jets answered by a patient knowledgeable tech.  

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Gleaner found out a combine is not the best place for an air cooled engine. From what I've read chaff would build up around the fins. The aluminum cooling fan blades would were down from chaff and other debris. Both leading to overheating.

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17 hours ago, IHBOWEN said:

I know how air and water cooled engines work, and know air cooled engines need air flowing over the fins on the cylinder and head for cooling. Alot of air cooled engines are stationary but still don't overheat even though there is no air flow. Remove the water from a water cooled engine and let it run and it overheats and will seize up. Both are a cylinder, piston and head. Maybe a dumb question but was just curious!!

With non blower air cooled engines, (motorcycles, atv’s) removing the airflow does not necessarily mean you removed the cooling medium. Even sitting motionless, some cooling is still taking place. Hot air off the cylinder/head rises, pulling up colder air beneath it. 
 Yes , it may eventually overheat, but take much longer than a water cooled engine; there is no air flow at all inside the water jacket, additionally forming an insulating layer between the cylinder, block exterior and the cooling air. 

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