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What’s the best overpriced item you’ve ever bought?


1256pickett

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I don't know if its my most overpriced purchase, but it is my favorite and that would be my Milwaukee fuel grinder.

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12 minutes ago, JDpartsman said:

I don't know if its my most overpriced purchase, but it is my favorite and that would be my Milwaukee fuel grinder.

My first one burned up right away. 2nd one seems to be holding up better.

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D6B  Caterpillar....still going after 61 years.......

.....made when America  was the power house of the globe in respect of heavy industrial equipment......

......sadly , it seems today its all candy floss and  social excrement......like in California where men hold hands and the women have plastic ...ahh ...... mammary   glands....:unsure:

Mike

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16 hours ago, KWRB said:

I don't think you gotta worry about me being over the limit. One's PLENTY.

Guys trying to do multiples seem to practice catch and release. Tho they avoid the license fee they may get to pay any one of various "other fees" 😳

12 hours ago, Bgriffin856 said:

New equipment. I'd rather have several older tractors but new equipment mainly hay equipment pays for itself quickly. Spent my youth helping fix wore out equipment to get by. Especially manure spreaders we had several used and wore out ones and they always broke down in weather like we had the past week. New hay equipment pays for itself quickly when weather and quality will make or break you. Keep it maintained and it'll last a very long time like anything else 

I didn't know hay equipment ever paid for itself! 

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On 1/19/2024 at 2:55 AM, IHKeith said:

My favourite over priced tool is my Snap On ball joint press.  Most of my tools these days are Snap On.  I didn’t start out 25 years ago with Snap On but over time I’ve replaced some of my earlier tools and added many more.  In my area Snap On has always been constant, other brands like Mac and Matco are good but there isn’t always a dealer that comes around every week, the Mac and Matco dealers come and go every few years.  Knowing you’ll have a dealer is to service your expensive tools is a great thing about Snap On.  For there air/cordless tools they have a flat rate repair program, some tools like my 3/8 air ratchet and 3/8 cordless impact cost $130 to rebuild and 1/2 impact or air hammer cost $250.  The tools come back with non wear components reused but the rest of it brand new, the 3/8 cordless came back all new I think it’s one of their tools that is made overseas.  Even if some of their stuff is produced overseas it is still well serviced by people from North America.  Most of their tools are still made in USA.

I bought a set of Snap On feeler gauges that only goes down to .006 inch and adjusting valves on my small engines I need .003, I have a set of 3/8 impact extensions with the hog ring retainer for the socket that messed up and they never fixed it right I use my chrome extensions instead on my impact, an 1 1/8 chrome socket isn’t machined right and won’t fit over a peg socket rack, I tried to buy their nut drivers but they don’t have the hollow shank for accommodating long threads, I replaced a worn Blue Point cable type hose clamp tool with the new style Snap On tool and I preferred the Blue Point when it was new.  I warrantied a pair of side cutters that were loose at the pivot after 20 years, they were one of my first Snap On purchases, I held onto them for the sentimental value for a while but eventually traded them in, the new pair are just as loose.  That’s the only negative things I can say about them.  
 

There are other good tool brands out there but there are none as consistent as Snap On.  On some YouTube videos other ratchets have out performed Snap On in the test but I doubt that they would perform as well as long as the Snap On ratchet would or be repaired as conveniently.  Snap On is also the leader in offering different configurations of ratchet like a 18” long flex or solid handle 3/8 ratchet.  My Gray line wrenches perform equal to my Snap On, my Snap On combination wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers and more blow the Gray away.  I wasn’t a Snap On chrome socket fan until they came out with the FDX line, I used Mastercraft sockets from Canadian Tire for years.  I saw no advantage to the more expensive sockets, removing depleted exhaust manifold bolts, 14mm on a 9/16, 1/2 on 13mm, 3/8 on 10mm etc.  The FDX came out and I stopped using the torch.  I’m laying down some credibility to me being subjective about tool choice.  Snap On really has the difference from others in professional settings.  Many nasty jobs that the best do it yourselfers give up on and send my way are easier for me simply because of my tools.  One of the recent game changers is thin wrenches, they are good on stabilizer links, I didn’t want to waste my time on cheap ones, eventually Snap On had them on sale, 8-32 double ended open end $400, it’s a proud enough price but for me who uses them a few times a week they are indispensable.  I have saved using the torch and risking burning something, plus removing the wire wheel from the grinder is less prickly.  Snap On has cheapened up a bit lately, offering sets that skip a size or two, shrinkflation you could call it, and the prices are high just like a new pickup truck.  They are the highest grade in mechanics tools I think, way above Stanley owned Mac

When I bought my Snap On ball joint press it was about 800 bucks and an OTC was about 3-400 bucks.  I bet the Snap On is 1200 now.  Despite all my Snap On love, you can still get your job done with cheaper sockets and pry bars.  If you’re going to do 2-4 ball joints once a year for 20 years then buy a Snap On ball joint press.  The Snap On press has a wider spread than most and has adapters that actually fit most applications, the typical OTC press requires cutting one of the adapters in half to accommodate installing lower ball joints in a 97 Chevy K1500, the Snap On has much higher grade of steel used for its adapters as well, it’s a monster.  Hands down there is no other 

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I bought an OTC similar to your snap on there, the quality is good and I do not use it daily, but at the time i seemed to be doing a lot of U-Joints and it came in equally handy for those as ball joints. I don’t do many ball joints because i own a grease gun, but with these new sealed units, that may change. All in all a good purchase! 

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16 hours ago, supermechanic said:

Most overpriced tool in my kit is the Snap On Zeus scanner.

 With some extra patch cords and a case, I got a great deal at just over $11,000 .

 I found I was taking half a dozen trucks every month(give or take) to the dealership for some scanning/diagnostic code work. I think it will pay off in the long run.

There is one of these scanners at an equipment auction, dated about 2000. Very little detail available. Do you think this scanner could be worth an offer, or would that old be trash. Want a scanner to work with a Cummins ISC powered 2001 Gillig transit bus, also needs Voith 4 speed auto and antilock air brakes and a few other features.

I stand corrected the scanner at auction Snap-On Solus automotive scanner, don't even know what it covers? but currently at $150. probably goot as a snap on.

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2 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

I didn't know hay equipment ever paid for itself! 

Get into custom baling and it does. The best thing I ever did was to start trading in my two round balers for new ones every other year. Before that I spent about as much time wrenching as I did baling. 

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16 hours ago, Bgriffin856 said:

New equipment. I'd rather have several older tractors but new equipment mainly hay equipment pays for itself quickly. Spent my youth helping fix wore out equipment to get by. Especially manure spreaders we had several used and wore out ones and they always broke down in weather like we had the past week. New hay equipment pays for itself quickly when weather and quality will make or break you. Keep it maintained and it'll last a very long time like anything else 

I had a neighbor that used to trade manure spreaders every two years. He said it’s the one piece of equipment no one wants to work on and he was doing daily spread so used it every day. Of course he went bankrupt and ran the farm into the ground but that’s another story. 

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25 minutes ago, 1256pickett said:

I had a neighbor that used to trade manure spreaders every two years. He said it’s the one piece of equipment no one wants to work on and he was doing daily spread so used it every day. Of course he went bankrupt and ran the farm into the ground but that’s another story. 

 

25 minutes ago, 1256pickett said:

I had a neighbor that used to trade manure spreaders every two years. He said it’s the one piece of equipment no one wants to work on and he was doing daily spread so used it every day. Of course he went bankrupt and ran the farm into the ground but that’s another story. 

t's my observation that most bankrupt farms have a yard full of new labor saving equipment at their going away sale!

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1 hour ago, oleman said:

 

t's my observation that most bankrupt farms have a yard full of new labor saving equipment at their going away sale!

This one was a slow downfall. Spreader was his only nice equipment everything else was beat to death. Even that at the end was not traded as often and beat pretty bad. I don’t know what went wrong, he didn’t live to extravagant, sold a whole hillside of gravel, 50 acres of woods cut down to saplings and a banker told me he was in almost 100k to three different banks. When they finally foreclosed equipment and cows were gone and land sale didn’t cover his debt. 

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21 hours ago, oleman said:

There is one of these scanners at an equipment auction, dated about 2000. Very little detail available. Do you think this scanner could be worth an offer, or would that old be trash. Want a scanner to work with a Cummins ISC powered 2001 Gillig transit bus, also needs Voith 4 speed auto and antilock air brakes and a few other features.

I stand corrected the scanner at auction Snap-On Solus automotive scanner, don't even know what it covers? but currently at $150. probably goot as a snap on.

My way of thinking is anything electronic that is over 10 years old is hopelessly outdated.

 You may get lucky, you may get hosed. It went to auction for a reason, usually that reason is that its usefulness is limited.

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21 hours ago, oleman said:

 

t's my observation that most bankrupt farms have a yard full of new labor saving equipment at their going away sale!

Not always. Sometimes the good stuff has already been repoed

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On 1/21/2024 at 7:04 PM, acem said:

It's illegal to possess more than one...

Only if you get caught🙄

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After some deliberation....

Anything around here with this logo on it.

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What's probably dime store stuff the world over is quite expensive in the States. They do make an excellent line of gardening tools & equipment. The only thing I didn't like was their electric water timers & the gas powered pump. Both crapped out just after the warranty was up. There watering tools are top notch & that's after a few decades of use in rusty water. I still have most of the first micro drip irrigation kits that were bought around 1990. Still have a bunch of the first snap ends for the hoses, too. I'll stop here, as I really could yammer on all day about them. Both good & bad things.

Mike

P.S. One thing must be mentioned... their dandelion & weed puller (Unkrautstecher) is quite amazing!! Certainly something I'd recommend looking into if you like to pull & not spray. We have two of the first one pictured. You can really put some a** into those things & not have to worry about breaking them. I'm an oaf & still haven't broken ours. Even pulling dandelions & burdock in the gravel driveway. The second one is the new model & can't speak about it from experience. Looks sturdy though.

 

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image.thumb.jpeg.abe7a10b0e3effcfadd0aa92b580cca2.jpeg

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On 1/22/2024 at 9:26 AM, ihrondiesel said:

Get into custom baling and it does. The best thing I ever did was to start trading in my two round balers for new ones every other year. Before that I spent about as much time wrenching as I did baling. 

I made decent money in my late teens and early 20's custom round baleing.  However, you almost had to visit certain customers carrying a Louisville Slugger to get paid!  They would not answer the phone or respond to a bill in the mail.  Finally had to demand payment before I went to work with some of them. Don't get me wrong,  some of them met me in the driveway with a check and a cold drink. They were a joy to work for. 

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On 1/21/2024 at 2:58 PM, KWRB said:

I don't think you gotta worry about me being over the limit. One's PLENTY.

yep, I wouldn't take a million dollars for my wife, but I wouldn't give you a nickel for another one just like her.

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On 1/22/2024 at 10:26 AM, ihrondiesel said:

Get into custom baling and it does. The best thing I ever did was to start trading in my two round balers for new ones every other year. Before that I spent about as much time wrenching as I did baling. 

Idk it can be good money unfortunately people don't want to pay a fair rate or pay at all around here. We did quite a bit when we got our first round baler but it was a hassle and the one guy expected his done before we did ours if we had hay down too. Another guy we baled alot for it worked out great then he bought his own baler which was perfectly fine. I don't mind helping someone out in a pinch especially if they help us out but I don't go out looking for custom work and turn most of it down

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1 minute ago, Bgriffin856 said:

Idk it can be good money unfortunately people don't want to pay a fair rate or pay at all around here. We did quite a bit when we got our first round baler but it was a hassle and the one guy expected his done before we did ours if we had hay down too. Another guy we baled alot for it worked out great then he bought his own baler which was perfectly fine. I don't mind helping someone out in a pinch especially if they help us out but I don't go out looking for custom work and turn most of it down

I do a little grass hay in the summer for some established customers, the rest is corn stalks.  Luckily enough I haven’t had a problem getting paid. 

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On 1/22/2024 at 1:12 PM, 1256pickett said:

This one was a slow downfall. Spreader was his only nice equipment everything else was beat to death. Even that at the end was not traded as often and beat pretty bad. I don’t know what went wrong, he didn’t live to extravagant, sold a whole hillside of gravel, 50 acres of woods cut down to saplings and a banker told me he was in almost 100k to three different banks. When they finally foreclosed equipment and cows were gone and land sale didn’t cover his debt. 

I know of two 100 cow dairies that sold out on in 09 and 11 even after selling everything they still owed hundreds of thousands of dollars. They both made a lot milk apparently expensive milk. It doesn't take long to add up a feed bill along with other expenses so it's believable 

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On 1/22/2024 at 7:35 AM, iowaboy1965 said:

Guys trying to do multiples seem to practice catch and release. Tho they avoid the license fee they may get to pay any one of various "other fees" 😳

I didn't know hay equipment ever paid for itself! 

It's not all new all at once lol just upgrading when the time comes. When a piece of equipment leaves this farm I feel sorry for the next owner. My parents are 1st gen farmers we made due with twice worn out junk for years and when it was time to upgrade reasonable price used equipment in good condition is non existent here so instead of buying a overpriced piece of junk just skip to buying new. Repairs are costly in parts and downtime and possible lost of a crop or lower quality crop. As for silage and tillage/planting equipment for all the more we do that'll probably never be new in my lifetime. Besides no one makes a pull type forage harvester in our size range

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4 minutes ago, Bgriffin856 said:

Idk it can be good money unfortunately people don't want to pay a fair rate or pay at all around here. We did quite a bit when we got our first round baler but it was a hassle and the one guy expected his done before we did ours if we had hay down too. Another guy we baled alot for it worked out great then he bought his own baler which was perfectly fine. I don't mind helping someone out in a pinch especially if they help us out but I don't go out looking for custom work and turn most of it down

I hired some baled my first few years before we got a couple balers. Sometimes it worked okay. Several time it was a struggle, because the guys I was hiring had hay down too, and rain in the forecast, and I felt like I was adding too much stress to them to try and get my hay and theirs. If we weren't so pressed with short weather windows...but we are.

I would and have baled for a neighbor to help them out, but I dont have time for anything else. Maybe if I wasn't working a job and farming on the side.

Around here, I know of some neighbors that share equipment and duties, like one owns the mower and rake, and the other owns the baler, and they work together to get both their hay up. That probably works better around here than custom baling.

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