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FoxrunFarms02

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On 12/29/2023 at 1:04 PM, Jacka said:

Wow,your story is awesome how you recovered. I also work on the roads for the state, interstate mostly and what you say hits home.One of the jobs i gotta do along with snow plowing is mow along the shoulders and middle in a very tight  environment. I don't even think what it would be like to be rear ended by a tractor trailer in the JD 6410 I run.I think you dodged a huge bullet being a parts guy.I would never want to do that, no offense to anyone that does.Good Luck.

Be careful brother. We had safety meetings weekly and the boss always printed off an articles about related mishaps in our field. I would be sitting on the platform of the bucket truck feet dangling looking at market place thinking. " no, not me, I'm smart, I put cones out, I put signs out, I have lights flashing, I have on safety yellow, this was some someone else, at another company, in another state, in a different town, for a different company it can't happen to me" but it can happen to you, your son, husband, father, at your company. When word got around to the family no one could believe it was me,Mr safety. It's crazy though how much impact you have on ppl you don't even know. I got cards in the mail from cashiers at the local gas station, churches, and random customers. It was heartwarming.

 

I agree about the parts position. It's not the job it use to be. Or the stereotype parts guy who knows your name, farm, line up, and part number off the top of their head. My fear was the farmer who miss used something and it'd be my fault it broke. Or 3 customers in line, desk phone is going off, cell phone is going off while the 3 younger parts people are in the parts room hiding.

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On 12/30/2023 at 12:12 PM, FoxrunFarms02 said:

Be careful brother. We had safety meetings weekly and the boss always printed off an articles about related mishaps in our field. I would be sitting on the platform of the bucket truck feet dangling looking at market place thinking. " no, not me, I'm smart, I put cones out, I put signs out, I have lights flashing, I have on safety yellow, this was some someone else, at another company, in another state, in a different town, for a different company it can't happen to me" but it can happen to you, your son, husband, father, at your company. When word got around to the family no one could believe it was me,Mr safety. It's crazy though how much impact you have on ppl you don't even know. I got cards in the mail from cashiers at the local gas station, churches, and random customers. It was heartwarming.

 

I agree about the parts position. It's not the job it use to be. Or the stereotype parts guy who knows your name, farm, line up, and part number off the top of their head. My fear was the farmer who miss used something and it'd be my fault it broke. Or 3 customers in line, desk phone is going off, cell phone is going off while the 3 younger parts people are in the parts room hiding.

Yes, I am careful but the danger is always there. I don't dwell on it,just do it.I know if they hit me I am dead. There are guys to scared to do it but someone had too.The foremen I work for are aware of the danger and appreciate how bad it is because they are out there a lot too.It is the higher up that thinks with their budgets and wallets, put on a public face that they care,are doing all they can but just blow it off and if you get hurt you were doing something wrong or against policy. Telling thing just the other day ran into a state construction inspector whom I known for 7 years who works in the same region as me.He was happy to tell me he got a new state job with the highway department. It was off of the road type, no more out in traffic doing site construction. He said with a wide open eyes and exclaimed he was so happy to be off the roads because" it is dangerous out there you could get killed "

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A bit of an update:

I tried the job. It was up my alley, the company, boss, guys, were all really nice, helpful and understanding of my limitations. For 2 days I checked in mixers, checked air pressure, lug nuts, add, removed, rewired, scales and monitors, tested timing, and hydraulics. The other days I went on service calls and super trucked. Unfortunately even with the help, use of cranes or pallet forks it was just too much on my body. Granted it was the 1st week, and I probably hit the ground running vs ease into part time but I was almost in tears and popping tylonal every few hours. The boss must of noticed everything and we talked a bit but we both agreed that the job was just too intense for me. Nothing bad on my end or his and only way to know was to try it. He was ready to go on a call that day so we couldn't talk much but he wants me to stop back Monday and sit down. It's disappointing and frustrating but good to know my limits especially before investing in extra tools or the company really training me. I'm sure like my whole " adventure " there's a rhym and reason. 

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I'm sure there's spmething for you that you will enjoy and be able to do with ease. Who knows maybe your boss from there has something in mind fpr you and wants to have the time to talk with you without being rushed. Good luck to you.

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way to follow thru on your attempt and try to see if it will work, maybe they will find something else or maybe you will find something new and better for all, glad you are able to keep working and try to find your place with your new modified body 

i have faith the Lord will see you thru no matter what plans come your way

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29 minutes ago, searcyfarms said:

way to follow thru on your attempt and try to see if it will work, maybe they will find something else or maybe you will find something new and better for all, glad you are able to keep working and try to find your place with your new modified body 

i have faith the Lord will see you thru no matter what plans come your way

Thank you. As I mentioned there's a rhyme and reason I'm sure. I maybe jumped the gun and should've done things differently to have a plan B, but can't live in what if's. I tried, I learned, off to something else. 

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Another update: I did a walk in interview for the local scag mower factory 10 minutes away and have an offer. I'm not 100% sure on it but will probably take it. The factory is actually an old home depot they refurbished and added onto 6 times and seems very clean and state of the art. Many mixed reviews online, between the typical last minute mandatory over time, equalling 60 hours a week. Decent benefits and every Thursday's free food gets catered in, employee discounts also on mowers. Factory pay is what you expect nothing close to my operator wages, but that will be part of my settlement with workers comp and the 3rd party. Pros and cons of my old job and this one. 1) is pay 2) flexibility or lack of - I could text my boss the night before and tell him the little guy was sick and 0 issues, here you're  needed on the line or else. 3) indoors. When it's 60 to 80 degrees out sun shining I love being outdoors........rain, in mud, negative Temps, snow, frozen face and fingures not so much. This factory is climate controlled so it was pretty comfortable.  I was pretty surprised to see the amount of older workers there.....5 to 10 years ready to retire. No one was prancing around smiling ear to ear but at the same point no one looked liked they were going to hang themselves from a paint hook. It looks very physical it's border line to my restrictions and need complete a physical but again not a lot of companies are interested in me with them so need to at least try. They can push out a mower every 6 minutes so the day should go by fast.

 

I worked at a factory out of high-school for 3 years. It was one of the best and worst jobs I had. The company made parts for JD, Oshkosh truck and cat. The day of the interview the supervisor admitted he forgot about it and told me to wait 20 minutes until he was ready, when I asked to see the factory he rolled his eyes opened up  a door and pointed to stuff. My 1st day I wasn't told to come in 5 hours later when the supervisor did so I sat in his office from 4 to 9 waiting to fill out paperwork and get my badge. 90 days I was supposed to get a review and raise when I asked about it " there was no documentation of me starting " and for another 90 had to fight corporate to get it. Many many lower class people there, almost all with criminal records. I learned a lot there though. I moved up to a lead within 7 months......mostly cause I showed up or was still employed there. After awhile I was floating around different departments.........while still supposed to be getting my lead work done. So I learned how to paint, got involved in shipping, and being a yard dog driver, and learned how to mig weld......to a point. The supervisor was still himself through all of that. He approved a week of vacation for me and then that week fishing up north he calls screaming wondering where I'm at and that next week had to show my vacation slip. I ended up taking a new position with a new supervisor in welding. I loved it, put in my ear buds, put on my helmet, do 3 welds and send it back to assembly for a Crack addict to run caulk over the piece to make it look like a solid weld. I came in, knew what to do/except tuned out the world under my helmet and no matter the weather I was getting solid hours. I left there cause the hours got ridiculous.  It was supposed to be 4/10's, then 5/12's, then 8 hours Saturday and 4 Sunday.  

 

It's not right to base the new job on that bad factory but I'm walking in very hesitant. Who knows it might be what I'm looking for or need to move on. The biggest thing is. It's a job, something I can relate to, I'll get out of the house and have money coming in for the family again.

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7 hours ago, FoxrunFarms02 said:

Another update: I did a walk in interview for the local scag mower factory 10 minutes away and have an offer. I'm not 100% sure on it but will probably take it. The factory is actually an old home depot they refurbished and added onto 6 times and seems very clean and state of the art. Many mixed reviews online, between the typical last minute mandatory over time, equalling 60 hours a week. Decent benefits and every Thursday's free food gets catered in, employee discounts also on mowers. Factory pay is what you expect nothing close to my operator wages, but that will be part of my settlement with workers comp and the 3rd party. Pros and cons of my old job and this one. 1) is pay 2) flexibility or lack of - I could text my boss the night before and tell him the little guy was sick and 0 issues, here you're  needed on the line or else. 3) indoors. When it's 60 to 80 degrees out sun shining I love being outdoors........rain, in mud, negative Temps, snow, frozen face and fingures not so much. This factory is climate controlled so it was pretty comfortable.  I was pretty surprised to see the amount of older workers there.....5 to 10 years ready to ready. No one was prancing around smile ear to ear but at the same point no one looked liked they were going to hang themselves from a paint hook. It looks very physical it's border line to my restrictions and need complete a physical but again not a lot of companies are interested in me with them so need to at least try. They can push out a mower every 6 minutes so the day should go by fast.

 

I worked at a factory out of high-school for 3 years. It was one of the best and worst jobs I had. The company made parts for JD, Oshkosh truck and cat. The day of the interview the supervisor admitted he forgot about it and told me to wait 20 minutes until he was ready, when I asked to see the factory he rolled his eyes opened up up a door and pointed to stuff. My 1st day I wasn't told to come in 5 hours later when the supervisor did so I sat in his office from 4 to 9 to fill out paperwork and get my badge. 90 days I was supposed to get a review and raise when I asked about it " there was no documentation of me starting " and for another 90 had to fight corporate to get it. Many many lower class people there, almost all with criminal records. I learned a lot there though. I moved up to a lead within 7 months......mostly cause I showed up or was still employed there. After awhile I was floating around different departments.........while still supposed to be getting my lead work done. So I learned how to paint, got involved in shipping, and being a yard dog driver, and learned how to mig weld......to a point. The supervisor was still himself through all of that. He approved a week of vacation of me and then that week fishing up north he calls screaming wondering where I'm at and that next week had to show my vacation slip. I ended up taking a new position with a new supervisor in welding. I loved it, put in my ear buds, put on my helmet, dig 3 welds and send it back to assembly for a Crack addict to run caulk over the piece to make it look like a solid weld. I came in, knew what to do/except turned out the world under my helmet and no matter the weather I was getting solid hours. I left there cause the hours got ridiculous.  It was supposed to be 4/10's, then 5/12's, then 8 hours Saturday and 4 Sunday.  

 

It's not right to base the new job on that bad factory but I'm walking in very hesitant. Who knows it might be what I'm looking for or need to move on. The biggest thing is. It's a job, something I can relate to, I'll get out of the house and have money coming in for the family again.

Yes,try it.You won't know until you try.

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Finding a good anyone to work for is a craps shoot & I wish you the best.

Tried to think of something encouraging to say about factory work, so here goes....

Anything would beat working Mickey D's or delivery.

The idea of a door-to-door salesman has some merit. If things go wrong, there's always a way out.

Mike

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I have noticed a big change.... at least here in Illinois.... the manufacturing places I deliver to can't get people to work and when they do they don't stay. I don't remember where you are located but I  think you will find it different than it was. They don't even drug test anymore here because weed is legal now.... It's disgusting.

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9 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Finding a good anyone to work for is a craps shoot & I wish you the best.

Tried to think of something encouraging to say about factory work, so here goes....

Anything would beat working Mickey D's or delivery.

The idea of a door-to-door salesman has some merit. If things go wrong, there's always a way out.

Mike

I totally agree. I haven't had to look for a job in 10 years but seems like there's reasons why places are short handed.......either too many easy " jobs" to make a quick buck or good workers get burnt out. I was involved in the hiring process of my past employer and if someone step foot on the property remotely interested they were hired we were hurting for help so bad. The biggest issue was the two groups of guys........family guys who worked and expected more out of and the younger guys living at home just coming in to pass the time. The family guys always got dumped on, burnt out and quit. Usually the people coming in for an interview weren't really the future cdl or equipment operator type either. I didn't bother to learn names or train too much until the 2nd week in.

My biggest problem finding a job is my limitations. Most places see I have restrictions or considered 48% "disabled" because I can't move my right leg 100% anymore and they're worried I'm a high risk factor or will get reinjured costing them money even though places are " equal opertunity"  I'm happy this place considered me. I had to fill out some paperwork on disability and it said they have 7% of employees with disability there. I'm not even technically hired yet and I'm a number lol.

Around my area 15.00 an hour is average for retail, flipping burgers or being behind a parts counter. My wife is a penny pincher and we don't live outside our needs but I have no clue how people can live off that. I'm sure glad though we didn't spend away my over time checks and all the over time really helped figuring out my workers comp benefits. 

Today with everything just a click away it's real easy to click and review a place or make a video of it so word gets around about  places. As mentioned above there's just too many easy buck jobs out there for the new generation to want to work full time. I use to listen to podcasts plowing snow. One was about the new generation isn't materialistic. They get a small 1 room apartment so no mortgage payment, and very little rent, they don't have a car so no payments or insurance or gas, when it's time for rent or groceries they play some games online, take surveys or door dash on their bike. 

Not to be disrespectful to anyone in manufacturing but I feel like I can do so much more but with my limitations, and area there isn't much out there. I look at it as I'm doing what needs to be done for my family and that's it. Kind of like the farm crisis discussion on here. I don't have to be at this place forever either, it can be a stepping stone. Not saying the next stepping stone will be better it could be a crocodile ready to eat me up but we'll see what happens when the time comes.

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7 hours ago, F-301066460puller said:

I have noticed a big change.... at least here in Illinois.... the manufacturing places I deliver to can't get people to work and when they do they don't stay. I don't remember where you are located but I  think you will find it different than it was. They don't even drug test anymore here because weed is legal now.... It's disgusting.

I'm from SE WI about 2 hours from the IL border. I think part of problem is companies burning workers out by being short handed. Also it seems like there's too many " quick buck jobs" like Uber or door dash where a person can do what they want when they want where they don't have to work 40 to 60 hours a week or too many government programs to be played. This company does 3 different drug tests, and not to be judgemental but everyone there seemed pretty with it......unless they didn't have those people come in during " walk in interview Wednesday ". My past employer they didn't care as long as the the 4 out of 13 cdl guys were clean. Someone walked in somewhat interested but you could tell they were dirty no one cared it was a body. I had no problem screaming at those guys or sending them home if they were useless or almost got hurt. It was interesting receiving a tip from a customer those guys would leave for an early lunch and come back higher than the bucket truck could reach. Clients started noticing the new groups of guys at company and started doing business elsewhere. What a waste and shame.

I do hope this factory is positive experience from the last one.

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1 hour ago, FoxrunFarms02 said:

I totally agree. I haven't had to look for a job in 10 years but seems like there's reasons why places are short handed.......either too many easy " jobs" to make a quick buck or good workers get burnt out. I was involved in the hiring process of my past employer and if someone step foot on the property remotely interested they were hired we were hurting for help so bad. The biggest issue was the two groups of guys........family guys who worked and expected more out of and the younger guys living at home just coming in to pass the time. The family guys always got dumped on, burnt out and quit. Usually the people coming in for an interview weren't really the future cdl or equipment operator type either. I didn't bother to learn names or train too much until the 2nd week in.

My biggest problem finding a job is my limitations. Most places see I have restrictions or considered 48% "disabled" because I can't move my right leg 100% anymore and they're worried I'm a high risk factor or will get reinjured costing them money even though places are " equal opertunity"  I'm happy this place considered me. I had to fill out some paperwork on disability and it said they have 7% of employees with disability there. I'm not even technically hired yet and I'm a number lol.

Around my area 15.00 an hour is average for retail, flipping burgers or being behind a parts counter. My wife is a penny pincher and we don't live outside our needs but I have no clue how people can live off that. I'm sure glad though we didn't spend away my over time checks and all the over time really helped figuring out my workers comp benefits. 

Today with everything just a click away it's real easy to click and review a place or make a video of it so word gets around about  places. As mentioned above there's just too many easy buck jobs out there for the new generation to want to work full time. I use to listen to podcasts plowing snow. One was about the new generation isn't materialistic. They get a small 1 room apartment so no mortgage payment, and very little rent, they don't have a car so no payments or insurance or gas, when it's time for rent or groceries they play some games online, take surveys or door dash on their bike. 

Not to be disrespectful to anyone in manufacturing but I feel like I can do so much more but with my limitations, and area there isn't much out there. I look at it as I'm doing what needs to be done for my family and that's it. Kind of like the farm crisis discussion on here. I don't have to be at this place forever either, it can be a stepping stone. Not saying the next stepping stone will be better it could be a crocodile ready to eat me up but we'll see what happens when the time comes.

Out of curiosity, have you thought about self employment?

If anything, it would be something to work toward with your factory gig.

And..... if you ain't makin' money for yourself....

Mike

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1 hour ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Out of curiosity, have you thought about self employment?

If anything, it would be something to work toward with your factory gig.

And..... if you ain't makin' money for yourself....

Mike

Before the accident I was thinking about going off on my own for landscaping.  I did stuff at night or weekends a few hours here or there with my own stuff for cash or trade of power tools or farm equipment and away from my employers territory.  Being the boss, the secretary, mechanic, all together kind of worried me and talking to others who done it said it wasn't worth it.

A lot of friends and family bring stuff for me to weld on and thought of some sort of weld shop but have a lot to learn to go from farm welding to a professional.

People suggested with my pictures I should create books or calenders or be a photographer. Most people do it on the side and there's so many "Kendra Marie" or "Owen's Outdoors" college kids doing it I don't think I'd get much business.

My dad is about to retire from ag sales but not ready to slow down. We always talked about  building a large shed/warehouse and being a seed dealer. I worked for a farmer who had 200 acres and then sold seed and chemicals, seemed like he did decent on it. With the 3rd party settlement I could invest in a shed and seed but the settlement won't be closing anytime soon, not sure what it's even worth and have other things that'd need to be addressed before building a shed.

I thought about building a green house and getting bunks of different stone and being a landscaping supplier but it'd be kind of seasonal and again not sure the kind of demand it'd have for the area.

The town I live in is pretty small, and sort of trashy depending on which side of the lake you're on. There's a small 8 building down town of just bars, a pizza joint, an antique mall, and some small side business. You need to run 15 minutes either directions to get to the next town to get nuts or bolts and nails. I often think it'd be nice to have something in town here when you run low on something and don't want to waste 45 minutes for a trip for a small box of nails. I thought a few times of making a small MA and PA hardware store in one of those buildings. Something like you see on Home Improvement where guys come in and can have coffee, you can run in grab what you want and be back to your project in 5 minutes. Have a big store front window with a display in it. Again not sure how popular it'd be.

When I wasn't recovering from surgeries it was nice being at home getting stuff done, taking care of my son. I thought with the settlement money fix up the buildings and get into steers. Or even work part time at a tsc and try to farm more.

As you can probably tell I think a lot but very cautious on acting or over think. 

I always like having an ABC- XYZ back up plan so having something with insurance is nice if my wife looks for something else. Biggest thing is in 3 to 4 years I was told I'd need a knee replacement. Granted workers comp should still be covering that and lost wages but being employed somewhere is a nice back up for short term disability incase I go past the workers comp covering period.

Making my own money being my own boss sounds great  but it's nice going in somewhere being told what to do, and at the end of the day I go home and its not my problem. Granted that money in my pocket for my time is nothing vs what the ceo is making on the product I sent out the door.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Update to the updated update: I had to have a physical and drug test for the factory. 2 years ago before my accident I needed a physical for my fed med card. After my accident it took a bit longer to fill out the paperwork explaining surgeries,  hardware, pain etc. There were a few tests I couldn't complete due to my restrictions but passed everything else with some struggles. The results go back to the factory and their " in house doctor gives the final okay"

 

Today I got a call from the local Kubota/Stihl/Polaris dealer. Back in November I applied for a parts and delivery position and never heard anything from them.  Every other week the ads were removed and reposted so I applied again and again to show workers comp and my attorney I'm looking for a job. Well today they called and said their hiring program is finicky and a new hire walked out........this place has lots of new people good and bad. It seemed a bit odd like the time one dealership didn't respond to numerous emails, and after a bad review calls me to tell me my info didn't go through their system but couldn’t explain how they had my number. We talked on the phone for 15 minutes and they asked me to come in whenever to walk around. They showed me the parts room and computer system which seems like the typical Napa or o Reilly's( is it a v6 or v8, 4x2 or 4x4, to match your wiper blades?) The guy who walked me around sat down privately with his boss for 5 minutes came out and said he really likes me and will call Monday with an offer. I was in and out after 15 minutes. The place is right across the road from the factory and unfortunately about the same pay. The factory is 6-2:30 when slow then its 5:30 to 3:00 and 5 hours every Saturday and the dealership is 9-5 with every other Saturday 9 to 12.I have a lot of questions to ask about benefits, raises and of course discounts. So we'll see.  Pros and cons to each job. The factory would be nice in winter, not dealing with frozen binders, or figures. The factory I can turn my brain off vs the dealership always dealing with customers.....which I feel I'm good with providing a welcoming smile or greet but dealing with idiots really makes that go away. I feel the dealership would be less physical and understanding of any family emergencies but we'll see what the offer is.

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Six of one...half dozen of the other. You sound like me. Always second guessing if it's going to be the right decision. Most times by the time I make a choice it's too late. I hope that doesn't happen for you. 

I worked concrete for years and loved it. It was tearing apart my body and I was too bullish to realize it. Took a winter job doing oil and tire changes one year and never went back. Then a buddy called me and said they were looking for a shipping and receiving clerk where he worked. I took the job for the same pay but no weekends. After being in the building a few months it became clear it was the machining they did that intrigued me. So, I started pushing buttons on production runs and studied the machines until I taught myself how to program them. I moved to machinist for years. As my farm/construction body caught up with me and a few spinal and neck surgeries later I transitioned to CNC programming. No more heavy lifting and way better pay. I never would have considered this would be my career back in school. My point is. You have the drive. Whatever you try, if it's not right, you'll know. There's always someplace to transfer to. Maybe in the same company and maybe in a completely different field of work. 

Keep looking and don't second guess it. You can and will succeed.

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6 hours ago, Dzldenny said:

Six of one...half dozen of the other. You sound like me. Always second guessing if it's going to be the right decision. Most times by the time I make a choice it's too late. I hope that doesn't happen for you. 

I worked concrete for years and loved it. It was tearing apart my body and I was too bullish to realize it. Took a winter job doing oil and tire changes one year and never went back. Then a buddy called me and said they were looking for a shipping and receiving clerk where he worked. I took the job for the same pay but no weekends. After being in the building a few months it became clear it was the machining they did that intrigued me. So, I started pushing buttons on production runs and studied the machines until I taught myself how to program them. I moved to machinist for years. As my farm/construction body caught up with me and a few spinal and neck surgeries later I transitioned to CNC programming. No more heavy lifting and way better pay. I never would have considered this would be my career back in school. My point is. You have the drive. Whatever you try, if it's not right, you'll know. There's always someplace to transfer to. Maybe in the same company and maybe in a completely different field of work. 

Keep looking and don't second guess it. You can and will succeed.

Thank you. We sound a lot a like. My fear was with the tree and landscaping gig I couldn't do that until retirement. It sucks what happened to me but I feel like it was a ticket out of a crumbling company and I might have to take something out of my box I never thought of........I applied as an appliance sales person. I didn't get it I believe between " just being an operator" and my "risk factors ". Not knowing what I wanted to do in life out of school I worked a factory to stay busy I learned many different jobs in many different departments. I feel like every job I had was a stepping stone to progress to the next greatest thing. Just kind of hard when that last stepping stone was secure, and comfortable.  In high school my guidance counselor was on me about going off to school and we had to write a paper about our future, our plans and working our dream job. My parents got a call about it apparently  the 1st line writen " Ronny Vanzant once said if you want to hear God laugh tell him your plans" and going on how I'll probably find a job to pay the bills and support my family but I'm not going to go on and on about a feary tail dream life wasn't what the teacher was looking for. It's crazy where life takes us. Sometimes you just need to go along for the ride and you might end up where you least expect...............tell me in high school with all my John Deere memorabilia I'd sell my John Deere B, get an M and enjoy being on a Red forum I'd give that person an off look.

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just go for it!!

What’s the worst that can happen?

Statistically speaking, the worst that can happen is a very rare event. 99 times out of 100, that event doesn’t happen.

And quit saying the word quit. It does no good for anyone. Learn to say you’re “adjusting course”. 

I don’t want to come off like I know it all. Just passing along tidbits that helped me out along the way.

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I agree I didn't know what I wanted to do out of school so I used the process of elimination trying different jobs and have just finished with a satisfying career.

If your not comfortable with risk I wouldn't recommend self employment although you do have a gift with photography, but with everyone owning a smart phone and camera not sure there's a profitable market there now.

In spite of credentials the #1 employable feature to me is are you interested in whatever job it is, if you are this is the biggest step towards success.

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Also on the factory job it's not really a climate that builds fulfillment but can bring stability. 

On the parts job it can be an environment to be good at what you do but the better you are the more customers want to deal with only you.

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3 hours ago, zleinenbach said:

just go for it!!

What’s the worst that can happen?

Statistically speaking, the worst that can happen is a very rare event. 99 times out of 100, that event doesn’t happen.

And quit saying the word quit. It does no good for anyone. Learn to say you’re “adjusting course”. 

I don’t want to come off like I know it all. Just passing along tidbits that helped me out along the way.

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Yes very great advice. I try to look at my accident as a blessing in disguise. It really changed who I was mentally and physically. I discovered who I could call true friends and how random people you see everyday care very much.  Old high school friends, old Co workers, family, neighbors, gas station cashiers, customers all sending cards or stopping out to check on me or help with farm stuff. But the 14 guys I see more than my family, what you thought was brotherly bonds, guys who you helped finish up jobs instead of going home early, a company you changed personal plans for, a company you bent over backwards for, a company you help succeed a dollar store get well card over the last 2 years. It opened my eyes and put family 1st and even after 8 years of a solid job I was good at it I see whatever I do next as a good opportunity.  If a company doesn't want to gamble on me cause of my limitations it's their lost. With my accident I discovered little wins. 1st time sitting up, 1st steps, 1st time in real clothes. Everyday we need to look at the little wins. It's okay to get down or show emotion but don't let that run your life. 

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18 minutes ago, hardtail said:

I agree I didn't know what I wanted to do out of school so I used the process of elimination trying different jobs and have just finished with a satisfying career.

If your not comfortable with risk I wouldn't recommend self employment although you do have a gift with photography, but with everyone owning a smart phone and camera not sure there's a profitable market there now.

In spite of credentials the #1 employable feature to me is are you interested in whatever job it is, if you are this is the biggest step towards success.

I heard a qouet once of something like " if you find a job you love, you'll never work again " I agree with that.  I went after a well drilling job for the money. Great pay, poor atmosphere, poor crew, 5 guys in 1 hotel room, you dreaded going in. My landscaping job wasn't 100% perfect but didn't mind coming in, enjoyed what I did, had fun, and enjoyed the results. I think the parts job is more up my alley or relatable.

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