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Dec. 7, 1941


7and8and1456

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If you ever get to Oahu go to the Arizona memorial, I've been fortunate enough to visit many times through the years and it makes for misty eyes every time. It's gotten fancier over the years and reservations needed now:

https://www.nps.gov/perl/index.htm

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God bless those boys and girls  that died that day . They wanted to be able to celebrated the birth of Jesus just like us but paid the ultimate sacrifice 

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1 hour ago, New Englander said:

If you ever get to Oahu go to the Arizona memorial, I've been fortunate enough to visit many times through the years and it makes for misty eyes every time. It's gotten fancier over the years and reservations needed now:

https://www.nps.gov/perl/index.htm

There should be no need for reservations to show your respect for the people still entombed in that sacred spot! 

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1 minute ago, Diesel Doctor said:

There should be no need for reservations to show your respect for the people still entombed in that sacred spot! 

Long lines. Launch takes enough to fill the memorial and stays for a respectful time. Another US Navy launch is landing while one is departing. Visitor center is way improved with more material than my first visit in the early '70s.

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30 minutes ago, Diesel Doctor said:

There should be no need for reservations to show your respect for the people still entombed in that sacred spot! 

Your right there should be no need but it’s also a good sign that that many people want to show their respect. 

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Dad was 11 when he went to the barn to tell my grandfather about the attack on Pearl.  He said grandfather leaned his head against the cow he was milking and heaved a heavy sigh.  Then he told dad “I’m thinking about all of the young men that are going to die before this is over.”  Grandfather was drafted into the army in 1918, but never made it out of the country for WW1.  That quote sticks with me.  The Arizona memorial is a powerful reminder of the sacrifices made and how terrible war is.  You would think mankind would learn…..

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10 minutes ago, axial_al said:

Dad was 11 when he went to the barn to tell my grandfather about the attack on Pearl.  He said grandfather leaned his head against the cow he was milking and heaved a heavy sigh.  Then he told dad “I’m thinking about all of the young men that are going to die before this is over.”  Grandfather was drafted into the army in 1918, but never made it out of the country for WW1.  That quote sticks with me.  The Arizona memorial is a powerful reminder of the sacrifices made and how terrible war is.  You would think mankind would learn…..

Mankind has learned, and learned plenty. The supposed elites who create the conditions that result in combat ignore the costs borne by others as they profit handsomely from the carnage and the cleanup. In case you might be skeptical, please consider why The Marshall Plan to rebuild Western Europe after WWII has never ended.

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  Hopefully, the Arizona will remain untouched other than relieving her of the remaining fuel load.  It's estimated that nearly half of her normal full fuel load remains with the ship but is slowly leaking.  The Saturday prior to the attack the Arizona was full fueled meaning carrying a million gallons of fuel oil.  The concern is the ship's tanks have been steadily deteriorating meaning an uncontrolled release of fuel oil is likely.  The Oklahoma was lost at sea while under tow to the West Coast where it was to be scrapped in 1946.  Talk has been of a Ballard type exploration effort to find her.  There is talk of salvaging a bomber off of the Lexington which rests at the bottom of the Coral Sea and on the day of the attack was ferrying warplanes to the Western atolls in the Pacific along with the Enterprise.

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On 12/7/2023 at 6:25 AM, 7and8and1456 said:

Dropping a little bit of history nerd in on this picture 

That explosion in the picture was the Destroyer U.S.S. Shaw. Sitting in drydock.

As terrible as that explosion was the ship was repairable and went on to fight the rest of the war

Last picture is what it looked like after it was repaired

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b7575e08ee9da24d9024a20ebcb89d58.jpg

1024px-uss_shaw_dd-373_september_1938.jpg

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Read Resurrection by Daniel Madsen

It is an excellent account of the efforts to return as many ships as possible to action after. The work of both the Navy and civilian contractors in a harbor full of floating bunker oil is heroic. The account includes the Shaw and all of the other ships. The Arizona finally was deemed not salvageable and the guns and the rest of the topsides removed.

I've lent that book to a couple of local guys whose fathers actually were there. It seems their dads never really talked about it and, like most of that generation, got on with their lives.

 

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8 minutes ago, New Englander said:

Read Resurrection by Daniel Madsen

It is an excellent account of the efforts to return as many ships as possible to action after. The work of both the Navy and civilian contractors in a harbor full of floating bunker oil is heroic. The account includes the Shaw and all of the other ships. The Arizona finally was deemed not salvageable and the guns and the rest of the topsides removed.

I've lent that book to a couple of local guys whose fathers actually were there. It seems their dads never really talked about it and, like most of that generation, got on with their lives.

 

Most of the Arizona's super structure is still on Ford Island.  Somewhat secluded and guarded.  The hull was basically blown in two and given the extensive loss of life the Navy decided to leave it alone.  The Oklahoma most likely would have been left alone if it was not so far out into the channel.  Efforts were made to upright the Utah but those efforts failed and it was deemed too expensive to engage in any other cleanup operation.  Naval expert Drachinel has a series on Youtube about the cleanup and refloating of the remaining battleships.  

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That is an excellent book.  Very detailed accounts of the salvage operations. 

I'll get there some day.....Arizona,  then Missouri......bucket list trip.

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