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Tools that just don't get used (regularly)anymore. Big or small.. .


Farmerboy72

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10 hours ago, SDman said:

Talking about things not used anymore...the entire way of growing corn in my area in the 1970s has been gone for some time now. Instead of a corn planter, we used a lister. It dug a trench 4-6" deep that the corn was planted in to. The displaced dirt would form ridges between the rows. Think of it as the opposite of ridge-till farming. Then we would cultivate the corn with a machine called a go-devil(other places called them a go-dig, or an ely). The first pass cultivation would leave the ridge between the rows still standing, the second pass would throw the ridge into the rows. 

Most of the tillage tools we used back then aren't used much anymore, either. Moldboard plows, chisel plows, one-ways, Noble blades/blade plows, rod weeders are all pretty much a thing of the past.

I drove by my neighbor's old place a couple months ago. Out in the back of his machinery yard, I spied his IH one-way that I ran back in the 1980s behind a 3588 2+2. I'm about 99.9% sure its in the same place that I parked it back in 1985/86 when we got done using it. Memories....

As a guy that has been down 14 many times to Pierre, the scenery is so different to me too. When I was a kid in the late 80s/early 90s I remember seeing a lot of Farmalls. Seemed like almost every farm/town house had letter series up to 86 series. A lot of Farmhand F10/F11 loaders on them too. Fewer tractors now. Bigger ones in their place. And lots of John Deere as you head east into MN.

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On 12/2/2023 at 4:31 PM, KWRB said:

I have one of these. This one isn't mine, but looks like it. It's a Coates Tireman pneumatic tire changer. I inherited it. I had never seen it used, let alone used it myself, until a few years ago. I did a couple of front tires just for grins. Well, they may have saved some labor, but they're still real physical work. I put it back after that and haven't used it since.

 

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At $30 to fix a tire, you may want to put this back into service?

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On 12/2/2023 at 5:28 PM, supermechanic said:

A.O. Smith, the company that broke thousands of small dairy farms.

One of these on a farm was almost a sure sign of bankruptcy.

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17 minutes ago, acem said:

I'll take my old wildcat grinder any day.

Yep, in some applications there is no substitute for continuously available power and extra weight actually helps with the job. My old design Hole Hawg is rated at 115 VAC @ 7.5A or 862.5 watts of power into the motor. I wouldn't want to be carrying around a battery pack that could produce that much power for a 4 hour shift.

 

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21 minutes ago, Farmerboy72 said:

Not sure what this is for, I assume it is for fence repair? Found it on the workbench.

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Nail puller

Good for ring shanks 

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Many of those that milked in Riverside county moved north to Tulare county. The reason for the new dairy equipment on display at the farm show there.

A few guys from Riverside came to San Luis Obispo county. None started a new dairy over here.  We don't have the water for alfalfa and corn silage like the San Joaquin valley.

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On 12/3/2023 at 1:52 PM, Steve C. said:

The cans were usually cardboard and the ends were metal.

Esso where I worked they were all metal. The plunging tool worked on the gallon cans too. One gallon and one quart pretty much in every car. Emptys drained into a big funnel and would produce a couple of quarts in a couple of weeks. Those went into some cars by my thief boss, I saw him wipe off oil filters. True multi-grade!

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On 12/3/2023 at 11:50 PM, Mr. Plow said:

Things I never use.......abrasive chop saw.  Once I got a carbide saw, the chop saw collected dust

My chop saw is gathering dust as well as I use my band saw for metal work now. Can a carbide blade be used in a chop saw?

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20 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

At $30 to fix a tire, you may want to put this back into service?

Guess I should feel lucky. 

Had a plug put in the tire of my wife’s vehicle yesterday morning for 18 dollars. 

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1 hour ago, New Englander said:

My chop saw is gathering dust as well as I use my band saw for metal work now. Can a carbide blade be used in a chop saw?

Different rpm requirements. 

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18 hours ago, Farmerboy72 said:

Not sure what this is for, I assume it is for fence repair? Found it on the workbench.

IMG_20231205_151859146.jpg

IMG_20231205_151909564.jpg

Got 9ne  keeps the grand kids busy for hours ,such a toy 

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18 hours ago, Farmerboy72 said:

Not sure what this is for, I assume it is for fence repair? Found it on the workbench.

IMG_20231205_151859146.jpg

IMG_20231205_151909564.jpg

You use the slide handle to drive the jaws in around the nail head, then pry against the foot sticking out to pull it. Super handy for pulling drywall nails, which is something else pretty much not used anymore. If you do any sort of old house or barn renovation, this is a great tool to have. You can still buy them new.

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36 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

You use the slide handle to drive the jaws in around the nail head, then pry against the foot sticking out to pull it. Super handy for pulling drywall nails, which is something else pretty much not used anymore. If you do any sort of old house or barn renovation, this is a great tool to have. You can still buy them new.

I have one. Never used it. I understand it is less destructive to the wood than, say, a cats paw. Is that correct?

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4 hours ago, New Englander said:

Esso where I worked they were all metal. The plunging tool worked on the gallon cans too. One gallon and one quart pretty much in every car. Emptys drained into a big funnel and would produce a couple of quarts in a couple of weeks. Those went into some cars by my thief boss, I saw him wipe off oil filters. True multi-grade!

I worked at an independent gas station in 1959, near Myrtle Beach SC, there were no paper cans then. Our biggest selling oil was Texaco 30 WT.

I believe the gas pump|s had an oil drain can in the pump or attached to the pump. We would give the can-drain-oil to anyone who ask for it. We used it at the station for a squirt can for hinges and that level of lubs.  We were fair and honest with our customers. OIL COMPANY credit cart cards were a problem. Nothing was on line so a book of bad card numbers were published weekly and sent via regular mail to the station, taking credit card  was always a gamble for the business back then.

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3 hours ago, KWRB said:

I have one. Never used it. I understand it is less destructive to the wood than, say, a cats paw. Is that correct?

Depending on how deep the nail head is, there will still be some destruction, but yes, not as much as a cats paw.  I bought mine specifically for drywall at first, but haven't used my cats paw since.

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4 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

Depending on how deep the nail head is, there will still be some destruction, but yes, not as much as a cats paw.  I bought mine specifically for drywall at first, but haven't used my cats paw since.

Good to know. Thank you.

I can't see mine fitting as tidily in my tool belt though.

I suppose there's an obvious solution to this: make fewer mistakes!

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Back in 2008 I bought a pretty nice 15’ windrowing stalk chopper.  Used it hard for a few years, now it just sets.  Hasn’t had the windrowing hood on for at least 10 years.  Should just sell it but it isn’t worth a whole lot anymore, and of course after I sell it I will need it . . . 

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On 12/2/2023 at 4:31 PM, KWRB said:

I have one of these. This one isn't mine, but looks like it. It's a Coates Tireman pneumatic tire changer. I inherited it. I had never seen it used, let alone used it myself, until a few years ago. I did a couple of front tires just for grins. Well, they may have saved some labor, but they're still real physical work. I put it back after that and haven't used it since.

 

 

Those Coates tire changers are great and I still use the one my dad bought used from the local Co-op over 50 years ago. I'm old enough to remember how hard it was to change tires before we got the Coates machine. Now that was work with some bent up old home made tire irons and a hammer. 

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18 hours ago, oleman said:

I worked at an independent gas station in 1959, near Myrtle Beach SC, there were no paper cans then. Our biggest selling oil was Texaco 30 WT.

I believe the gas pump|s had an oil drain can in the pump or attached to the pump. We would give the can-drain-oil to anyone who ask for it. We used it at the station for a squirt can for hinges and that level of lubs.  We were fair and honest with our customers. OIL COMPANY credit cart cards were a problem. Nothing was on line so a book of bad card numbers were published weekly and sent via regular mail to the station, taking credit card  was always a gamble for the business back then.

The cans at the pump just went into the trash; there was lots of the very cheap oil sold on the gas island as so many of the old clunkers were followed around by a blue cloud. The oil change folks at least used the better grades. Another station my friend worked at had the glass quart bottles of bulk oil. The drum was simply labeled 30w, nothing else. The real oil burners went there. I worked a few shifts for him. It was the no-name station, 19 cents/gal, unknown octane, cash only😉.

Yeah, credit cards were a PITA! The old machines, carbon paper, take back to the customer on a clipboard trying to keep it dry, etc. At least when it was raining you could round up a fill-up a few cents by letting it spill a bit in the hope it was cash and run back to shelter.

Had a bad card that came on a special notice. It seems one of the night guys had a stolen card and was faking charges and pocketing the cash!

Checked oil, battery, radiator on about 50% of cars. Cars these days don't burn oil, have sealed batteries, for the most part don't leak coolant or overheat, and have tire pressure sensors.

Do you remember the Saabs pulling in holding a quart of oil out the window?

 

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6 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Those Coates tire changers are great and I still use the one my dad bought used from the local Co-op over 50 years ago. I'm old enough to remember how hard it was to change tires before we got the Coates machine. Now that was work with some bent up old home made tire irons and a hammer. 

Friends dad had a manual tire changer similar to that when I was in highschool. No pneumatic anything.  Changed a lot of tires on it myself. We thought it was great at the time.

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On 12/6/2023 at 7:00 AM, Reichow7120 said:

Guess I should feel lucky. 

Had a plug put in the tire of my wife’s vehicle yesterday morning for 18 dollars. 

I bought a set for doing them, 80-100 bucks, but all metal, bunch of attachments, when my wife had a nail I couldn’t find it, turns out my brother borrowed it, i had to buy a new one, so i am around 160-200 bucks for a plug 

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