Jump to content

Tools that just don't get used (regularly)anymore. Big or small.. .


Farmerboy72

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, IH Forever said:

I remember these when I was young. Dad had several hanging in the milk room on the old barn, wonder if he still has them? I also remember metal cans of Hershey’s syrup, Hi-C, etc that you used a can opener and basically opened the same way.

I pretty much have an entire shed that would fit into this thread. Not sure why I have all this stuff…takes up a lot of space.

 

IMG_4626.jpeg

   The contents of your shed are a work of art to a guy like me.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't use these anymore

image.png.e0c64f1b533453176933492cbaf561b3.png

 

since I got this:

image.png.10eaa58aec9dcf2d64abc85b599f9d00.png

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

My dad had a funnel for oil cans. You put the oil can in and it had a lever on the back of the funnel that pushed the can down and pierced it. It held it while it drained. It was still a useful funnel long after oil cans weren’t a thing anymore. I hadn’t thought of it in years. I think one of my brothers ran over it and ruined it. I just looked and found one just like it on eBay. I should buy it.

If you don't, you'll probably always regret it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, IH Forever said:

 

IMG_4626.jpeg

1200 sickle mower?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

In the day before they made quart oil cans with a neck you got a can of oil literally. You needed a way to pour it out and punch the can. You shoved it in the can. It opened it then you could pour the oil out.

Probably one of the few guys under 40 that knew what that was

The cans were usually cardboard and the ends were metal.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, Steve C. said:

Where I grew up they were called Blue Tombstones.

I don't know, but would suspect that either and/or both lenders and university extensions actively promoted these at one time.  Does anyone here know?

Ive heard them called a lot of things

Monuments to a broke farmer, Bankruptcy tubes, Blue Tombstones. Farm sale markers ( saying in the 80s went if you were looking for a farm sale in a general area but didn't know where. If you saw a Harvestore or multiple Harvestores on the horizon, aim towards that. Chances were that is where the sale was)

I don't know much but they were stupid expensive. 1970 Grandpa priced to build a silo out at the feedlot. Priced a Harvestore ( dealer was local) and a poured cement top unload silo ( company out of Northwest Ohio) Dad said they could build 2 and a half 20×60 poured cement silos for the price of a Harvestore of the same size.

I have read that late 70s/ early 80s it was roughly 1000 dollars a ft to put one up. Im sure diameter played a part in the equation but that is rough easy math. Plug in a height and come up a rough figure for price for the tube errected. Not counting footings, fill pipe or unloader which is a pricy endevor on its own. 

We work a guys farm ( what's left anyway) who was a Harvestore salesman best friend i swear, probably put his kids through college type customer. 7 tubes and 2 slurry pits for a little over 200 head. I tell you what that all cost it would give you a coranary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Reichow7120 said:

Ive heard them called a lot of things

Monuments to a broke farmer, Bankruptcy tubes, Blue Tombstones. Farm sale markers ( saying in the 80s went if you were looking for a farm sale in a general area but didn't know where. If you saw a Harvestore or multiple Harvestores on the horizon, aim towards that. Chances were that is where the sale was)

I don't know much but they were stupid expensive. 1970 Grandpa priced to build a silo out at the feedlot. Priced a Harvestore ( dealer was local) and a poured cement top unload silo ( company out of Northwest Ohio) Dad said they could build 2 and a half 20×60 poured cement silos for the price of a Harvestore of the same size.

I have read that late 70s/ early 80s it was roughly 1000 dollars a ft to put one up. Im sure diameter played a part in the equation but that is rough easy math. Plug in a height and come up a rough figure for price for the tube errected. Not counting footings, fill pipe or unloader which is a pricy endevor on its own. 

We work a guys farm ( what's left anyway) who was a Harvestore salesman best friend i swear, probably put his kids through college type customer. 7 tubes and 2 slurry pits for a little over 200 head. I tell you what that all cost it would give you a coranary

  A nearby farmer put up a Harvestore silo during the late 1970's and it was a thousand dollars per vertical foot.  HIs silo was a 20 feet wide by 90 feet tall unit.  He also put up a large slurry store unit.  It was a major contributor to his bankruptcy.  The math used by the salesperson was not absurd.  It did not take into account using reasonable practices to get similar quality feed out of different systems.  For high moisture systems the math was reasonable for the then cost of propane but then the bottom came out of the energy market during the early 1980's.  A fear that NYS Department of Environmental Conservation was going to ban winter and early spring spreading of manure drove slurry store sales.  In the end that fear was completely unfounded.  It was not just gulliible folks who got sold a bill of goods but some highly regarded farmers.  Most are still in business today but the blue monuments taken down and sold off.

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, 5488ih said:

IMG_1572.thumb.jpeg.516af7d5909f21bbc4c2b0b3bac39138.jpeg

Part of the Facebook group? Or actually take that?

This place had 26 at one point. Found it online 

FB_IMG_1701638349914.jpg.c5cdf98ed62168013ee00ff309ac42de.jpg

FB_IMG_1701638383775.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cant ( logger tool) 
We used the one with good handle two weeks ago. Other one I got to replace the handle .

IMG_4993.jpeg

IMG_4992.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Best cant hook I got- and it's hanging on the wall. 

20210312_215510a.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  A nearby farmer put up a Harvestore silo during the late 1970's and it was a thousand dollars per vertical foot.  HIs silo was a 20 feet wide by 90 feet tall unit.  He also put up a large slurry store unit.  It was a major contributor to his bankruptcy.  The math used by the salesperson was not absurd.  It did not take into account using reasonable practices to get similar quality feed out of different systems.  For high moisture systems the math was reasonable for the then cost of propane but then the bottom came out of the energy market during the early 1980's.  A fear that NYS Department of Environmental Conservation was going to ban winter and early spring spreading of manure drove slurry store sales.  In the end that fear was completely unfounded.  It was not just gulliible folks who got sold a bill of goods but some highly regarded farmers.  Most are still in business today but the blue monuments taken down and sold off.

What was the milk price back then?  Back in that time period whole small dairy farms would sell here for not much more then the cost to put up 2 of them.  Seems a crazy high price for that time period.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, hobbyfarm said:

What was the milk price back then?  Back in that time period whole small dairy farms would sell here for not much more then the cost to put up 2 of them.  Seems a crazy high price for that time period.

  12-13 dollars per hundred weight.  But who knows what the terms were on average for financing?  Variable rate based on the prime with 1980-81 having rates in excess of 20 percent.  Payback period?  5 years or 20 years?  Did FMHA or Production Credit roll the balance onto the farm mortgage?  On paper the Harvestores offered a payback but the real world is far more dynamic.  Sure, the Harvestore produced excellent haylage but what was the cost per pound versus a stave silo or bunker or bag system?  Like I said not everybody wound up with egg on their face who bought one but they had to be a little miffed to see someone do better in the end with a cheaper setup.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, td9bcf180 said:

Saw wrench for changing inserted tooth saw bits on circular saw blades.

2 sets of Double whipple trees.

1606160372895.jpg

2 sets double treesa.jpg

Still use our saw tooth tool once a year usually. Used to be twice but we don’t cut as much anymore.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

Cant ( logger tool) 
We used the one with good handle two weeks ago. Other one I got to replace the handle .

IMG_4993.jpeg

IMG_4992.jpeg

 

1 hour ago, td9bcf180 said:

Best cant hook I got- and it's hanging on the wall. 

20210312_215510a.jpg

Our best ones the handles have gotten rotten. Have a couple of longer ones and one metal stihl one that work but they’re kind of a pain to use too with the longer length. The nice short ones were easier to handle. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a row crop head that is just taking up space. I only kept it because someone said they worked really good in down corn, but the last few times we had some down I just put the reel on the corn head. I always say I would like to try and cut some beans with it, but I never have. It’s in too good of shape to let it set out. 
 

IMG_0459.thumb.jpeg.85d772dedd573475f2dc4461444e287c.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Steve C. said:

The cans were usually cardboard and the ends were metal.

And if you didn't have the style Ace shows you had the old bottle top opener on one end and the other end punctured and folded in a triangle shape opening. That's the style I usually had or could find. 2 triangle holes and a funnel for me. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...