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This buds for you!


acem

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21 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Well that’s actually what I was thinking. I don’t really know a lot of the history of the Big Bud’s/Wagner tractors. So if there’s very much commonality between the two I could really say. However I would guess there is some….. just by looking at the two tractors brands. 

You could paint those Wagner’s white and half a mile way you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between it and the Big Bud that started this thread.  Big Bud and Rite for the matter took off were Wagner ended.  Same exact design just heavier components.  Also Wagner was sort of responsible for the existence of Steiger.   

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1 minute ago, Big Bud guy said:

The guy did admit they saw a slight yield decrease in some situations with 15” spacing .  15” might work in wetter areas for sure and I know wide spacing can be desirable in chick peas.  But 30-40 bu wheat doesn’t canopy over very good here in anything wider than 10”.  The whole thing flies in the face of Phil Needem who advocates narrower spacing is better not that he is the right all the time.  All our drills are in 7.5”. 

There are some guys who raise 15” wheat around here. They claim it works ok, but I have my doubts about that. The main reason you see it here is because there are tons of 15” soybean special drills that guys already have, so that’s what they use. 7.5” drills aren’t common here anymore because everything is geared primarily for soybeans. 

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2 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

There are some guys who raise 15” wheat around here. They claim it works ok, but I have my doubts about that. The main reason you see it here is because there are tons of 15” soybean special drills that guys already have, so that’s what they use. 7.5” drills aren’t common here anymore because everything is geared primarily for soybeans. 

I thought guys were taking 7.5” drills and locking one of the gangs up for soybeans.  

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6 hours ago, Sask466 said:

I remember seeing one at an auction in Melfort SK in the mid-90’s.  My dad made a point to take me over to it and look it over/tell me it was a rare beast.  This thread brought back a fond memory!

 

 

Wagners if going by production numbers actually aren't rare.  The problem was they limited themselves to the Pacific Northwest and only reached far as Montana, Wyoming, western Colorado and Nebraska.  There were some sold in Alberta too.  So anybody else living outside those regions probably wouldn't ever see one except at an antique tractor show now.  The numbers I've heard thrown around was somewhere around 3,000 built from the mid 50s to 68'.  They were popular here and had several neighbors including one relative that farmed with them.  

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38 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

I thought guys were taking 7.5” drills and locking one of the gangs up for soybeans.  

Years ago they were, but single rank soybean specials are about the only drills around here anymore. There are a few dual rank models, but you about have to look to find them. 

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56 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

 

 

Wagners if going by production numbers actually aren't rare.  The problem was they limited themselves to the Pacific Northwest and only reached far as Montana, Wyoming, western Colorado and Nebraska.  There were some sold in Alberta too.  So anybody else living outside those regions probably wouldn't ever see one except at an antique tractor show now.  The numbers I've heard thrown around was somewhere around 3,000 built from the mid 50s to 68'.  They were popular here and had several neighbors including one relative that farmed with them.  

Interesting - 3000 does sound like quite a few.  Versatiles dominated around where we farmed.  Steigers were rare, and Buds non-existent.
 

If anyone finds themselves driving the Trans-Canada highway between Swift Current and Regina, there is a newer Big Bud parked on a farm just north of the highway near Chaplin/Mortlach area.   There used to be one of those Series 1 seen in the fields around there now and then as well.  
 

Harve isnt too far from those areas.  

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10 hours ago, hardtail said:

A lot of similarities between the Sandhills and the Palouse which I didn't realize and some unique features which only the Sandhills seem to possess, very interesting and the challenges of responsibly farming it

The Sandhills is not farming country but there are those that do

And some succeed

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

You could paint those Wagner’s white and half a mile way you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between it and the Big Bud that started this thread.  Big Bud and Rite for the matter took off were Wagner ended.  Same exact design just heavier components.  Also Wagner was sort of responsible for the existence of Steiger.   

And the Deere WA-14 and WA-17’s are just Wagners painted green and yellow right?

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I like 7.5 or narrower for rice. Used to run 6" with a conventional drill but run 7.5 with the jd750.

A few people run 10" so they can drill soybeans too. It's hard to close a 6-7.5" drill down enough without damaging the soybean seed.

 

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On 12/8/2023 at 1:16 PM, Sask466 said:

I remember seeing one at an auction in Melfort SK in the mid-90’s.  My dad made a point to take me over to it and look it over/tell me it was a rare beast.  This thread brought back a fond memory!

I remember going to a sale with my grandpa in the Yorkton/Melville area I think it was, and there was one, actually maybe 2 there. I was pretty young so don't remember exactly but they were not running. I remember thinking what a beast they were. Must've been two because I recall one had a scraper on it yet. Had the scraper hook up on the rear section above the axle. I don't remember what number they were either. They went scrap price. Has to be at least 20 years ago now

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On 12/8/2023 at 9:48 PM, acem said:

I like 7.5 or narrower for rice. Used to run 6" with a conventional drill but run 7.5 with the jd750.

A few people run 10" so they can drill soybeans too. It's hard to close a 6-7.5" drill down enough without damaging the soybean seed.

 

Local company manufacturers a no till drill with 5.5" spacing.  (Esch).  In the land of tiny fields they have a 12ft folding model that transports at 8ft.  The drill is very popular here locally.  We were just discussing why it is so popular.  Maybe the fact that there is a funding program that will give you half the cost of a no till drill back in state tax credits has something to do with it.

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1 hour ago, Sask466 said:

What part of Mb are you from?  I grew up on the Man-Sask border by Moosomin.  We had land right on the borderline 

An hour north of Brandon, just south of the park. I got family all over that eastern edge of Saskatchewan though so spent a bit of time out there. I'd be about 2 hours from Moosomin. Was actually through there 2 weeks ago to agribition 

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When it comes to drills and row spacings, I've seen just about every row width tried here. 6" and 7" spacings were common on the press drills back in the 1970s/80s, while at the same time, we had hoe drills for winter wheat with 10", 12", even 14" row spacing. Have seen 8" and 9" spacings as well. Most guys would tell you that there was no big difference in yield as far as row spacing was concerned.

15-20 years ago it seemed like most drills we sold were 7.5" spacing for wheat, then they would split-rank for 15" soybeans. The last 10 years or so I would say more have went to 10" spacing for wheat, then split-rank for 20" soybeans. Guys will tell you the yield is the same, but the drills are cheaper due to fewer rows and there is less maintenance costs due to the fewer row units.

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On 12/9/2023 at 3:45 PM, acem said:

My 6 inch conventional drill has the openers staggered in two rows for space. You could probably stagger them in three or four rows and get it to work.

Nobody is trying to make 100 bushel wheat here.

We ran just shy of 120 bu this year at 7"

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14 hours ago, SDman said:

When it comes to drills and row spacings, I've seen just about every row width tried here. 6" and 7" spacings were common on the press drills back in the 1970s/80s, while at the same time, we had hoe drills for winter wheat with 10", 12", even 14" row spacing. Have seen 8" and 9" spacings as well. Most guys would tell you that there was no big difference in yield as far as row spacing was concerned.

15-20 years ago it seemed like most drills we sold were 7.5" spacing for wheat, then they would split-rank for 15" soybeans. The last 10 years or so I would say more have went to 10" spacing for wheat, then split-rank for 20" soybeans. Guys will tell you the yield is the same, but the drills are cheaper due to fewer rows and there is less maintenance costs due to the fewer row units.

That’s why we went to 30” beans. Even less row units. If I had some more time, I think I would experiment with even wider row spacings just to see. An 8 or 12 row wide planter would be very cheap to maintain compared to a drill. The seed varieties just seem to be very flexible these days. Narrow used to be better here, but I’m not sure it’s the case anymore. 

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6 hours ago, JaredT said:

We ran just shy of 120 bu this year at 7"

That is a big thing in Europe 3.5 or 4 inch row spacing. We run 10 inch spacing here. We used to run an opener that shot seed out each side so you had a 10 spread on shanks but a 7 inch gap between rows then twin rows 3 inches apart then another 7 inch gap. Up here they have small highly managed fields touching 100 some and in good years winter wheat will flirt with a 100 or more bushels an acre.

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17 hours ago, SDman said:

Guys will tell you the yield is the same, but the drills are cheaper due to fewer rows and there is less maintenance costs due to the fewer row units.

That’s fact but I like the narrow spacing because weeds are getting more chemical resistant all the time and want the crop to canopy over sooner just to help suppress the weeds that much sooner.  Some years I even get away without spraying the wheat in some fields.  Plus if you have a plugged boot, having a 14” gap isn’t as bad as 20”.  Had a neighbor I custom seed for tell me that. 

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30 minutes ago, dale560 said:

That is a big thing in Europe 3.5 or 4 inch row spacing. We run 10 inch spacing here. We used to run an opener that shot seed out each side so you had a 10 spread on shanks but a 7 inch gap between rows then twin rows 3 inches apart then another 7 inch gap. Up here they have small highly managed fields touching 100 some and in good years winter wheat will flirt with a 100 or more bushels an acre.

Concords were famous here for 12” spacing but a 3” spread boot.  Worked good in nice mellow soils but not good in hard gumbo soils.  

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