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Hot under the collar


MacAR

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I just read on FakeBook that the Arkansas state legislature is considering a study and a bill that may prevent farmers from burning their stubble in the fall after harvest, among other things. Maybe I'm wrong, but the idea of someone telling me I can't do something on my own land just steams me! It's bad enough we're regulated as much as we are without the citiots adding more regulations! I'm sorry, but if you don't like the sights and smells of farm country then get the he!! out of it!

Sorry for the rant fellas, but I just had to get it off my chest. I'm sure there is legislation in other states concerning this, and if so I'd appreciate any information on the subject you folks would care to share. Thanks,

Mac 

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......Mac...early daze yet ., but the farming community in NZ  gave a huge , collective sigh of  relief  at the trouncing of the  Socialist Govt.....

....careful here not to  offend    any one ...but I reckon a change over your way , just might help//

.....after all....all those poor immigrants   from   below your Southern Borders  will need a bit of tucker.....

and on another matter ...Happy BD  Mac  !!!...and remember, ''birthdaze ''  are funny things...You know, once I was 48 times older than you...now you are catching up fast...as I am a mere 2 and a half times older than you......You should be worried Mac....why  in a few years you might well overtake me...:unsure:

just sayin "...:rolleyes:

Mike

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As the area around the family farm in Lexington, MA went from rural to expensive bedroom community similar things happened. New houses sprouted up and the neighbors loved they were next to the picturesque farm with cows grazing on open fields until august when the sun hit the pig manure and suddenly it was " Wilma! that farm stinks, lets shut it down" and that's what happened, at least the pigs, dairy was the buyout. 

Homes in my town have become ridiculously expensive. People move in and suddenly discover there's an airport. "It's too noisy! let's shut it down".

Now the save the planet types think farms are contributing to climate change and seem to have nothing but time to protest. "They're burning the fields! that smoke can't be good, let's shut it down"!

People suck.

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Maybe these educated idiots will wake up before we are all standing in line for basic groceries...maybe... and just maybe... when they are stranded in a bad winter storm in their EV's with dead batteries and they have to be rescued from freezing...just maybe.

We all need to pray for a change of course before it's too late...and I mean pray  now! Things are changing faster than I ever thought possible. 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, New Englander said:

As the area around the family farm in Lexington, MA went from rural to expensive bedroom community similar things happened. New houses sprouted up and the neighbors loved they were next to the picturesque farm with cows grazing on open fields until august when the sun hit the pig manure and suddenly it was " Wilma! that farm stinks, lets shut it down" and that's what happened, at least the pigs, dairy was the buyout. 

Homes in my town have become ridiculously expensive. People move in and suddenly discover there's an airport. "It's too noisy! let's shut it down".

Now the save the planet types think farms are contributing to climate change and seem to have nothing but time to protest. "They're burning the fields! that smoke can't be good, let's shut it down"!

People suck.

WOW! change lexington, ma to bridgewater,nj and you have my life story right down to the small airport that has been there since 1946 (same as me) people suck.

pete 

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Not sure of the magnitude of the stubble burns .
The Canadian Fires this summer makes me concerned that it would force me to say inside ,could not breathe , no outside activities . May and June wasn't good here. 
 

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8 hours ago, mike newman said:

Mac...early daze yet ., but the farming community in NZ  gave a huge , collective sigh of  relief  at the trouncing of the  Socialist Govt.....

I really hope nothing comes of this, and there's a good chance it'll fizzle out before it goes anywhere. Our state Farm Bureau does a good job of holding up for farmers and they have the manpower and resources to put up a good fight.

8 hours ago, mike newman said:

Happy BD  Mac 

Thanks old friend! Just another day older and deeper in debt as the song says... I've got the day off from the office so think I'll tinker around the shop and try not to think about the current state of affairs. 

1 hour ago, MTB98 said:

Is burning field residue common in Arkansas?

Yes, very common. Most rice farmers burn their straw rather than bale it. Most of the concerns I've been seeing are from individuals who are either a) trying to save the planet or b) concerned with "public health". 

7 minutes ago, 560Dennis said:

Not sure of the magnitude of the stubble burns .
The Canadian Fires this summer makes me concerned that it would force me to say inside ,could not breathe , no outside activities . May and June wasn't good here. 
 

Nothing that serious, the burns are measured in days rather than months. I admit the smoke is pretty thick and it does affect some folks, but it's also just part of being in rice country. 

Mac

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The best way I can put it, without breaking any rules here is..... always remember the pen is mightier than the sword.

To most, that goes out the window when emotions are fueled.

So, keep your wits about you & your ink well full.

And Happy belated!

Mike

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9 hours ago, MacAR said:

 the idea of someone telling me I can't do something on my own land just steams me!  

Been going on for a long, long time.  You can't even manage the fish and wildlife on ground that you own.  You can "own" a thousand acres of wilderness and yet you're not allowed to determine which fish to catch and eat, or how many squirrels or deer you harvest.

Everything's heading toward its logical conclusion.

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Same sort of issues here. State of Washington pretty much closed the door on burning blue grass residue after harvest. Idaho still allows it. Also depends if you happen to live on a reservation or not when it comes to paper work. My farm is all on reservation so any burning I do as to be approved by them. They charge by the acre so adds up pretty fast to get a permit. If not on a reservation much cheaper and easier getting permits.  

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I don't know about Arkansas but the Missouri Conservation department burns off hundreds of acres around here every fall, all in the name of prairie restoration. The closest one is 10-12 miles East of me and if the wind is right you can not only see it but smell it for days. I don't care if they burn it but if they are allowed to do so ,so should anyone else.

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2 hours ago, MTB98 said:

It doesn’t appear the study is based on environmental  concerns but reacting to an earlier multi-car crash with fatalities blamed on smoke from a burning field covering the roadway. 

Is burning field residue common in Arkansas?


https://www.kait8.com/2023/12/01/study-approved-burning-crop-residue/

The biggest burns in Arkansas are in the national forest by the US government. However they are exempt from burning regulations...

Atlas Shrugged.

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51 minutes ago, acem said:

The biggest burns in Arkansas are in the national forest by the US government. However they are exempt from burning regulations...

Atlas Shrugged.

The USDA has a long list of procedures and requirements they must meet to do a prescribed burn. They’re not going out and just setting the forest on fire one morning because they have time and the weather seems ok. 
If someone starts a fire on their land that causes damage, or in the Arkansas case loss of life, should they be held responsible?  One person’s rights can be restricted when they infringe on another’s. From what I read on the OP topic the study was introduced after a vehicle pileup due to thick smoke.  
Burning rice stubble seems to be a common practice worldwide, learned something new today.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/sites/default/files/2023-06/Rx-Fire-Strategy.pdf

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I agree that the USDA (Forrest service) follows guidelines and that fire is a good  forestry and agricultural management tool.

However the legality of burning in Arkansas is not new. We've had regulations for a while that requires you to have a permit to burn certain sizes of average (I've been to the class but don't remember the details).

Bottom line has been that this is largely driven by EPA air quality numbers.

We don't have the type of air pollution California, new York and urban areas have but they hammer us on occasional high opacity numbers.

Most of these opacity violations are from forestry burns because they need a slow low intensity burn. Crop residue is burned at higher intensity.

However the farmer gets regulated while the main cause is not regulated because it's the federal government.

The environmentalists can't have it both ways. They want healthy forests without large scale use of herbicides (which I support). But you shouldn't punish the farmers trying to chase numbers.

We need some common sense in government, news media and the people.

Unfortunately that's an uncommon commodity...

I incorporate my rice stubble by rolling it into the water. I think it's better for my soil and the environment.

PXL_20231122_161451769.jpg

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1 hour ago, from H to 80 said:

I don't know about Arkansas but the Missouri Conservation department burns off hundreds of acres around here every fall, all in the name of prairie restoration. The closest one is 10-12 miles East of me and if the wind is right you can not only see it but smell it for days. I don't care if they burn it but if they are allowed to do so ,so should anyone else.

Further proof that it's a matter of "who" instead of "what". It's assumed they must know better since it's the department of conservation although it could be called the department of kumquats and it would not matter.

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21 minutes ago, acem said:

I agree that the USDA (Forrest service) follows guidelines and that fire is a good  forestry and agricultural management tool.

However the legality of burning in Arkansas is not new. We've had regulations for a while that requires you to have a permit to burn certain sizes of average (I've been to the class but don't remember the details).

Bottom line has been that this is largely driven by EPA air quality numbers.

We don't have the type of air pollution California, new York and urban areas have but they hammer us on occasional high opacity numbers.

Most of these opacity violations are from forestry burns because they need a slow low intensity burn. Crop residue is burned at higher intensity.

However the farmer gets regulated while the main cause is not regulated because it's the federal government.

The environmentalists can't have it both ways. They want healthy forests without large scale use of herbicides (which I support). But you shouldn't punish the farmers trying to chase numbers.

We need some common sense in government, news media and the people.

Unfortunately that's an uncommon commodity...

I incorporate my rice stubble by rolling it into the water. I think it's better for my soil and the environment.

PXL_20231122_161451769.jpg

I enjoy your posts about rice farming. That’s all new to me and much different than regular row crops. 
This study being proposed in Arkansas doesn’t seem to be driven by environmentalists.  

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14 minutes ago, MTB98 said:

I enjoy your posts about rice farming. That’s all new to me and much different than regular row crops. 
This study being proposed in Arkansas doesn’t seem to be driven by environmentalists.  

Maybe but the existing regulations and some potential future regulations are. I'm on the local conservation district board and attend meetings about conservation and agricultural environmental issues.

I'm all for conserving the environment and natural resources. I don't want lake Erie to catch fire again (it did several times before the clean water act). I want people in the country and cities to breath air, drink water and eat food that doesn't harm them. However many of the regulations hurt us in the long run.

With most of our problems, it's the people that are the problem.

Hitler was elected by the people.

People are busy killing each other in several parts of the world.

 

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In Pueblo CO USA (could be state wide) a home owner can not legally collect the water that falls on the roof of his home! Be happy you are in AR.

We have a local airport that has been in this area for decades, I believe it dates back to WW1,  Single runway and no tower, today mostly private prop planes. Now I keep wondering how log before citibots start demanding they shut it down?  We had two plans crash several years ago, no one in the planes survived but no one on ground was injured after the wreckage fell into a busy local street. There were no calls for "close the airport", that I know of. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, oleman said:

There were no calls for "close the airport", that I know of

That's because you live in Texas. Sadly, with all the Californians moving in, they'll be looking to California Texas.

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7 hours ago, acem said:

Atlas Shrugged.

I don't think he's shrugged yet, but I believe he's fixin' to.

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5 hours ago, oleman said:

In Pueblo CO USA (could be state wide) a home owner can not legally collect the water that falls on the roof of his home! 

I would be in trouble here. All of my water is collected rainwater. We're close to a stone quarry and have very shallow soil. No wells anywhere close. No city water. We have a fairly large cistern under the two car attached garage and collect rainwater. 

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            ----- DISCLAIMER -----

--- THIS IS NOT A POLITICAL POST ---

-- PLEASE DON'T TAKE IT AS SUCH --

I had a couple conversations with my Farm Bureau guys, and they seem to think that this won't make it out of committee. Not sure what makes them think that, but they seemed confident. This will hurt the rice farmers the most, but from what I understand even small guys like me that want to burn a bit of hay ground or corn stalks will be affected as well. Sure, we could bale the straw or chop the stalks and plow them under. But who can afford the fuel for that? That question, and others, have been put to the committee and I'm waiting to hear what they'll say. There was talk of a fuel subsidy, but I don't see anything coming of it. All because the citiots don't want smoke in their subdivisions.

I understand and firmly believe that every citizen has a right to clean air, pure water, and good food. What kills me is that the majority of those citizens are burning **** to hamstring the minority that feeds and clothes them. What are they going to do once all the farmers and ranchers have been regulated out of existence? 

Mac 

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