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Cooking/kitchen advise needed………


Lars (midessa)

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Wifey and I have transitioned away from cooking with ‘non-stick’ pots and pans. Biggest challenge is trying to find the right cooking grease short of drowning the food, so as not to stick. We’ve tried butter, sausage grease, bacon grease, olive oil, avacado/coconut oil, with various success. Eggs are the biggest challenge, not matter what the eggs stick. What have others used that works for stainless steel pots and pans? TIA.

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I too moved away from no-stick pans about two years ago. I didn't like to see that no stick stuff peeling off after a short period of time. I now cook almost 100% on stainless steel.

It's been a learning experience but over time I realized that all those years of using T-fal and such brands had got me into the habit of heating my pans way too hot!

For example, when cooking eggs, on a heat setting of 1 to 10 I was cooking at 7 or 8. When I switched to stainless, I had the same problem as you, eggs were sticking to the pan.

No matter what "grease" I use now, oil, butter, margarine, I cook eggs at a heat setting of 2.

Do some experimenting by starting at a low heat, just enough so that when you add your butter or whatever it starts to melt. Add eggs and then raise the temp very cautiously to get the cooking you want. Same applies for browning chicken, frying bacon, pork chops or whatever. I think a good quality stainless pan distributes the heat across the bottom of the pan much more evenly than the no stick style.

Good luck, hope this helps.

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Butter lots of butter. Start with a hot pan with a good bit of butter my best bet just find the fat the government says is the worst,  and that fat is the best for you. Use that one generously

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We use almost nothing but cast. I have enameled and traditional, depends on what I am doing but mostly i use traditional. Olive oil is my go to, sometimes Pam works better. As said before go easy on the heat. 

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We are cast here. We've been using it for decades when we do reenactments. When we got our new stove and switched to gas in 2017, the house went cast too. No matter the cookware or heat source, the secret to any cooking is "low and slow". Can't rush perfection. I use bacon grease and the Mrs likes olive oil. We both use only hot water to wash and wipe down with bacon grease after with the pan still warm.

The new stove going in during the remodel.

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Use cast iron. Season it well and use a thin coating of grease. 

Easiest way to season a cast iron skillet is to apply an ample layer of lard. Then put corn bread batter in the skillet. Place skillet in preheated oven and cook cornbread. When cornbread is done remove from oven and eat cornbread.

Do not wash pan. Simply wipe pan out.

Next day repeat above and it is seasoned.

You may make some smoke the first time.

 

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Just curious, are you sticking food in your pan, and then washing/scrubbing it clean and repeating?

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CAST IRON the only material that tends to be non stick or little stick for most foods. BUT all my rice is cooked in SS pot.

A cupped  brush on an angle grinder will  safely clean up anything left including rust caused by neglect.

Corn oil baked on a clean skillet at 450F will work for awhile as non stick.

I have been running a cast iron skillet for over 75 years, LODGE is the probably best!

 

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I’ve been using cast iron last 6-8 years. Depending on what I’m cooking depends on what I use. Eggs-butter, lots of butter. Meat-corn oil. Popcorn and cornbread- bacon grease. Most anything else is olive oil. Also use the olive oil for seasoning. 
The big thing I took a while to figure out was letting it heat up enough first. One day I turned on the stove to cook eggs but got distracted. A little hotter than normal and they slid right out. My fault but man I’m glad I figured that out.  I do still get impatient sometimes and then I have to scrub a little. 

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16 hours ago, Dzldenny said:

matter the cookware or heat source, the secret to any cooking is "low and slow"

I thought the wife said that was true for non stick pans too. Can ruin them by using too much heat. Medium to medium high heat. I don't cook a lot but sometimes get in a hurry and used to turn up the heat to warm things up and get the cooking going.  We have a variety of pans including non-stick, stainless,  and cast.

 

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I have SS and cast iron, but I keep one of those "Copper Coat" fry pans for eggs. (Yes, the "as seen on TV" infomercial, but mine came from Walmart.)

Been using the thing for years, the no stick coating has not peeled off, & it's still as non stick as it was when new.

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1 hour ago, Cattech said:

I have SS and cast iron, but I keep one of those "Copper Coat" fry pans for eggs. (Yes, the "as seen on TV" infomercial, but mine came from Walmart.)

Been using the thing for years, the no stick coating has not peeled off, & it's still as non stick as it was when new.

Mother had an “Orgreenic” for years, same idea, i am convinced it was the same thing, different color, worked well for eggs, but I will stick with cast myself.

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The cast iron that has the cooking surface machined smooth works much better than the rough cast. 

Most of my cast iron is probably collectable but I use it everyday.

Do they make cast stainless?

The biggest problem with most modern skillets is how thin the metal is. Makes it warp easily.

Cook at an appropriate temperature depending on what you are cooking. I cook many meats at high temperature to brown/crust the outside.

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45 minutes ago, acem said:

The cast iron that has the cooking surface machined smooth works much better than the rough cast. 

Yes and no, if cast is treated properly I agree that the smooth surface works better, if you treat it like Mrs VT does and leave it in the sink overnight full of soapy water,  then scrub it to within an inch of its life, the texture seems to still do its thing just by re oiling. 

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46 minutes ago, acem said:

The biggest problem with most modern skillets is how thin the metal is. Makes it warp easily.

You say that, but the Wagner cast is very thin and quite light compared to even a modern Lodge, my Griswold stuff, the oldest anyway, is heavier, but i still say modern lodge is mighty beefy compared to any of my vintage cast. 

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2 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

You say that, but the Wagner cast is very thin and quite light compared to even a modern Lodge, my Griswold stuff, the oldest anyway, is heavier, but i still say modern lodge is mighty beefy compared to any of my vintage cast. 

Sorry I wasn't clear. I was referring to modern skillets (not cast iron) being very thin.

I see many stainless or non stick pans that are made of sheet iron thinner than the fender of a modern car...

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On 11/26/2023 at 6:10 PM, Lars (midessa) said:

Wifey and I have transitioned away from cooking with ‘non-stick’ pots and pans. Biggest challenge is trying to find the right cooking grease short of drowning the food, so as not to stick. We’ve tried butter, sausage grease, bacon grease, olive oil, avacado/coconut oil, with various success. Eggs are the biggest challenge, not matter what the eggs stick. What have others used that works for stainless steel pots and pans? TIA.

We got rid of the non stick stuff a while ago & switched to All Clad & some company who's name I can't pronounce. Temperature is everything. When you think it's hot enough, spritz some water on the pan (or spit). If it beads & sizzles off, you're ready.

Mike

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...''Lodge""  .....brought some every home after every American trip....went to the Tennessee  factory   and brought various  cast cooking   ''utensils''

....just the best....made in exactly  the right place... of the right material....and use Walnut   oil, at the lower end of the temperature scale....

...just cut your venison ....all   of it,  into strips  about  3/8ths    of the inch thick...about three inch's square ...or thereabouts....and drop it into that hot oil....season to taste and enjoy some bloody good tucker.....;)

Mike

Edit....One important point if using Walnut Oil.......Use only Domestic     US of A   cold pressed Walnut oil

NOT  CHINESE   walnut oil....you blokes are in enough strife ...food wise....  over there without using any food product from China

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