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Thoughts on Small CaseIH/IH Rotary Combines


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Looking for some feedback on smaller IH/CaseIH Rotary combines. 1420/1620 etc. I have small acreage corn/popcorn, small grain, and soybeans. Want to run 4 row narrow corn head and 15' grain table. Thoughts on performance, what to look for, pros/cons.

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Buy a 40/60. I've been out of the dealership parts since 2008 and some parts were NLA back then. And very little aftermarket support for them. Good 40/60's are only bringing 2000.00 to 3000.00

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Be aware - some of the more "common" machines will not FIT thru 4 row narrow.   I'm stuck on 36" corn because my JD 9500 BARELY fits thru 4 row wide (36").    I have too small of acreage to go to a 12 row planter, I refuse to combine unmatched (I don't plant straight)....so 8 row planter and 4 row wide head it is.

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1 hour ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

How about 2144 and 2344, the same as 1640/44? 

Yes, essentially. Tires and axles can be different depending on options selected or added later. If my brain housing is correct, 2344 production ceased before the 2366, which ended when they closed East Moline in 2005 and moved everything to Grand Island. Now I hear the rotor belt combines will be built in South America. ☹️

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The John Deere's 9000's are wider because of the cylinder. I used to have a 6620 and before buying a 1660 looked at a 9500. Couldn't believe how wide it was. A lot of my customers years ago had 4 row heads on 40/60's.

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We like our 1640, and we aren't big acre farmers.

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my 1460 with 30.5x32 tries will go down 4 30" rows if I rotate the ladder up sideways, without running down corn. I usually run the 1063 head, but have used an 843 when the bigger one is ailing.

From what I recall when i was looking to upgrade from a Massey 510, the xx20 combines seemed to have more issues with broken front axles than the larger sizes. 1440 and 1460 are quite similar, just more horsepower in the 60.

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30 minutes ago, ny bill o said:

my 1460 with 30.5x32 tries will go down 4 30" rows if I rotate the ladder up sideways, without running down corn. I usually run the 1063 head, but have used an 843 when the bigger one is ailing.

From what I recall when i was looking to upgrade from a Massey 510, the xx20 combines seemed to have more issues with broken front axles than the larger sizes. 1440 and 1460 are quite similar, just more horsepower in the 60.

  In tough conditions the 1440 will not fair much better than the 1420.  If fighting mud and climbing steep hills then the 1460 or 1660 is what you want.  

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1 hour ago, ny bill o said:

my 1460 with 30.5x32 tries will go down 4 30" rows if I rotate the ladder up sideways, without running down corn. I usually run the 1063 head, but have used an 843 when the bigger one is ailing.

I knew I read old posts about the 4 row here on RPF.  I run a 6 row 30” IH 1063 and it is a good setup.  Just got 1063 parts online for 10% off and free shipping.

Lots of AI and CNH parts for the 1460.

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When I was looking for an axial flow 24 years ago I was advised by my dealer and others to avoid the 1420/1620. They are good machines but parts availability is much better for the 40/60/80 size machines. I actually looked at a 1420 rice combine but ended up with a 1460 rice combine.

You might find a low hour 1440 from a smaller farm.

That said I still want a 1420 for some reason...

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2 hours ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

Interesting its that narrow.   My 9500 on 24.5-32 tires just BARELY squeaks thru 4-36.   The tires can brush the ears on the next row....about 6" of clearance to the row.

Back when we had a 4wd 9500 with 30.5 front tires, the back tires would run down a row of corn all the time in steep terraces with a 6R30. When we got rid of the 9510 we were using an 8R30 head. 

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the 1440 I had came from flat country set up for 4RN on 23.1s with the dish reversed.  I had the dealer set it up the conventional way before I took it home, we have too many sidehills

neighbor and I beat on that 40 and it kept shelling corn, it was a solid machine- when I bought a 1460, though, we were getting a lot more capacity in the same basic package.  The first thing we noticed- well, second after the increased power- was how surefooted the 28s were compared to the 23.1s

at this point the best reason to buy a 20 combine is the engine or more specifically the injector pump

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12 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

How about 2144 and 2344, the same as 1640/44? 

When you are talking Cummins-powered Axial-Flows, there are pretty much 3 main differences between 40 & 60 series:

1) Grain tank size. 60s had a 180 bushel grain tank, 40 series had 145 bushel grain tank.

2) Engine and HP. The 40 series combines all had 5.9L Cummins/CDC engines, 60 series used the 8.3L Cummins/CDC engine. The 5.9 L engines all still ran at the higher RPM(2500 RPM rated load). The 8.3L engines were slowed down to 2200 rated load RPM starting with the 1666.

3) Older 40 series used a lighter frame, final drives, and transmission. This was all the way up to the first year of 1644 production. These are easily identified by the brake housings mounted on the final drives. Starting with the last year of 1644 production, the 1644/2144/2344 used the same transmission, frame, and final drives as the standard 66 series combines. The HD final drives for the 66 series were the same as the 88 series. 

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Pioneer has some 2144 plot combines that they run a 4 row 30 inch head on so they can just lowboy the whole thing around without ever taking the head off.  Also while I will never try it because I have an 8 row head I think I could get away with running a 4 row 30 inch head on my 9500 as it runs in the row and does not trample any stalks down even with 30.5x32, but that would also require perfect guess rows as you would have 0 margin for error. 

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i just finished my 25th crop with my 1620.  hopefully it will

go another 5-7 more.  it has 4050 hrs on it.  run 843 and

15' 1020.  what few parts i have needed most have been

available. mine has specialty rotor, rock trap and chopper.

i also add the external sieve and chopper adjustments.

i would also agree with buying the 40/60.  

below is a checklist i was given from a dealer when i

was looking at combines.  it's for 16xx but can be used for

on other series too.

good luck!

 

Inspection checklist for Axial Combines

 1.  Put rotor gear box in neutral, open both sides of the rotor and roll the rotor over 360 degrees for balance.

 2.  Remove the 2 inspection panels on left side of the machine at ground level, inspect the rasp bars on the rotor.

 3.  Check concave sections (3) for damage.

 4.  Check the grates (3) under the back 1/2 of the rotor to make sure they are the "key stock" style.

 5.  Check the straight bars on the rear 1/2 of the rotor are not worn out.

 6.  Inside the rotor cage are vanes, 360 degrees around the inside, make sure they are not missing or laid flat.

 7.  The 3 augers under the concaves need to be check for wear, razor thin....

 8.  Check the top sieve condition; make sure it is not "trashed".

 Removing the 2 left side panels just behind the left front drive tire can inspect all of the above.

 9.  Open the clean out door to the vertical auger, razor thin???

10.  Inspect the 2 vertical auger drive gears at the same location.  These are open gears & must be greased regularly or will show excessive wear.

11.  At the front of the rotor, remove the inspection panel just the feeder house (10" x 24")

Check the impeller wear bars for wear, if worn to the point where the "elephant ears"/impeller bars show signs of wear, ALL the wear bars AND the elephant ears will have to be replaced.  These are sold in matched sets for balance.

12.  Up on top check the horizontal auger for wear.

13.  Check the 90-degree auger pivot section is not broken out at the base where the grease tubes discharges. 

14.  Are the floor augers thin??

15.  Check the top of the clean grain elevator for wear/breakage & sprockets for wear.

16.  Open the access door to the rotor drive belt & variable speed pulley, climb down into the work area, check all belts.  CAREFULLY inspect the housing weldments, sheet metal supports that are the rear support of the rotor itself.  This is a weak area.  To do this face the grain tank/rear of the rotor with the variable speed pulley on your right side.

17.  Don't move and reach down with your left hand for the small dipstick that is the rotor drive reservoir.  It has a small capacity and leaks into the rotor chamber which you never see.

18.  Check all normal items.  Lights, clutch, brakes heater, air etc.

19.  In the cab, on the left side, just under the window is a panel for access to all of the electrical controls, relays etc. mice??

20.  The final drives need to be checked for "rolling torque" as part of the negotiations. There maybe some marks on the final drive to indicate the date of service, torque reading etc. 

21.  Check the front axle frame weldments where the frame is connected to the front axle.

 

 

 

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