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DT466E Good? Bad?


New Englander

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The 7.3 used high pressure oil

for the INJ pump correct?
And if i remember right there is a plug on top where a quart or so that needs to be sucked out for oil changes because oil gets in, but doesn’t drain out. Are these series of engines the same? 

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5 minutes ago, Gearclash said:

Electronics that can go bad.  Been there and fought that.  

In the grand scheme electronics that are much more primitive and simpler to deal with than modern stuff.  

Honestly the only common things that stops those E engines (short of stuff that would affect a mechanical engine too) is cam sensor, low ICP pressure, or low ECM voltage.

All these mechanical fuel injection components are getting salty too.  I'll bet that big Bosch inline is tickling 3 grand after a full extortion by a fuel shop.  

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2 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

The 7.3 used high pressure oil

for the INJ pump correct?
And if i remember right there is a plug on top where a quart or so that needs to be sucked out for oil changes because oil gets in, but doesn’t drain out. Are these series of engines the same? 

Yes and no. The in-line engines use a a bit different hpop but it operates the same.

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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

The 7.3 used high pressure oil

for the INJ pump correct?
And if i remember right there is a plug on top where a quart or so that needs to be sucked out for oil changes because oil gets in, but doesn’t drain out. Are these series of engines the same? 

Yes, 7.3 V8 used same HEUI style to injector fuel. Lots of wires, sensors,  crazy reliable, no injection pump.

As for the quart of oil it's no big deal on them. Willing to bet 99.9% of them never got the oil sucked out of the reservoir during an oil change.

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13 minutes ago, brahamfireman said:

Yes, 7.3 V8 used same HEUI style to injector fuel. Lots of wires, sensors,  crazy reliable, no injection pump.

As for the quart of oil it's no big deal on them. Willing to bet 99.9% of them never got the oil sucked out of the reservoir during an oil change.

I have a friend who was a big 7.3 nut, i just remember him rattling on about it. It kind of stuck in my mind because my fire truck as a T444e and have often wondered if it too should be done. Maybe it is not the same. 

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Just now, vtfireman85 said:

I have a friend who was a big 7.3 nut, i just remember him rattling on about it. It kind of stuck in my mind because my fire truck as a T444e and have often wondered if it too should be done. Maybe it is not the same. 

7.3 PSD in a ford is the same as an IH T444E. But 7.3 PSD uses ford computer to run it vs IH.

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Best part about a heui engine is  almost impossible to burn one up from no oil.  Without oil pressure they use up what's in the starting reservoir in about 10 seconds and promptly die ;) 😉 

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9 minutes ago, Cdfarabaugh said:

Best part about a heui engine is  almost impossible to burn one up from no oil.  Without oil pressure they use up what's in the starting reservoir in about 10 seconds and promptly die ;) 😉 

My brother punctured the oil filter on his Power Stroke feeding cows. It died when it ran out of oil. It would have ruined any other engine because he would have never caught it. It’s as good as a Murphy switch. 

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19 minutes ago, Cdfarabaugh said:

Best part about a heui engine is  almost impossible to burn one up from no oil.  Without oil pressure they use up what's in the starting reservoir in about 10 seconds and promptly die ;) 😉 

They say the motorcraft filter or another make of high quality filter and draining that sump makes a huge difference in those engines. Just the case of buy clean oil and keep it clean.

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Thanks everyone. Truck was a RAT! Besides having a body that looked like it had been parked on the beach for a few years the wiring was a complete mess. Butt splices and even worse, Scotchlok connectors! Scotchlocks have caused more tail light failures by trailer hitch installers who used them to wire the trailer connector. Anything that pierces the insulation and then is left to dangle in the salt spray is doomed to failure. Why is it that every backyard mechanic thinks he's an electrician?

Anyway, the engine was running when I arrived; guy said he used brake clean to start it. Engine sounded smooth, no bubbles or oil in the coolant, didn't drive it. PTO wouldn't engage and that's when I noticed the rat nest wiring.

5.7 Olds: I came close to buying one when the Arabs shut the oil off. I had a '76 Ford PU with a 360 that was getting maybe 10 MPG and gas was going up a nickle a week if you could find a station that had it, a big deal back then, while diesel was steady and cheaper. Anyway, GMC dealer was difficult to deal with and totally pissed me off. Tires on '80 were smaller than '79 and looked lost in the wheel wells so I asked for a quote to up the size to the '79 size and the quote was outrageous. I could have bought them at a tire store for half the price and had the takeoffs too, so I cancelled the order. At the time anything that would get good mileage had additional dealer markup on the sticker which I refused to pay. I was based at PHL for Eastern and really didn't need a PU so bought a Toyota Celica for list at a dealer who declared he wouldn't add anything to list. Was a great car!

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For all the complaining about these engines, the fact that this 24 year old truck is STILL RUNNING should be an indication of how "bad" they really are. Especially, considering that this truck turned out to be a complete heap.

Mom had a 1980 Cadillac with the 5.7 diesel. Originally belonged to an Air Force Colonel who only used it to drive from base to base so it had extremely low mileage for its age. Beautiful car. Rode like a cloud, but couldn't get out of its own way. "Rolling coal" originated with this engine. Got a tailgater? Lay down a smoke screen. They'll back off. 

We weren't able to drive it long enough to find out about the engine problems. It got taken out in a head-on collision on the way home from a Buffalo Bills game. We replaced the front clip and tried to bring it back but the frame was bent and there was a mysterious battery drain. 

 

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1 hour ago, New Englander said:

Truck was a RAT!

Be patient and one will show up.  Even though they're getting pretty old, there's tons of them out there.  

The one I'm fixing up in another post is a "southern belle" and needs help BUT it doesn't have a speck of rust.  I'll fix wiring all day long before a crusty stuff.  

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8 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Originally belonged to an Air Force Colonel who only used it to drive from base to base so it had extremely low mileage for its age. Beautiful car. Rode like a cloud, but couldn't get out of its own way. "Rolling coal" originated with this engine. Got a tailgater? Lay down a smoke screen. They'll back off. 

flex ring and related fuel/timing issue

NE this one?

https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/1384580005738572

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13 hours ago, New Englander said:

Thanks everyone. Truck was a RAT! Besides having a body that looked like it had been parked on the beach for a few years the wiring was a complete mess. Butt splices and even worse, Scotchlok connectors! Scotchlocks have caused more tail light failures by trailer hitch installers who used them to wire the trailer connector. Anything that pierces the insulation and then is left to dangle in the salt spray is doomed to failure. Why is it that every backyard mechanic thinks he's an electrician?

Anyway, the engine was running when I arrived; guy said he used brake clean to start it. Engine sounded smooth, no bubbles or oil in the coolant, didn't drive it. PTO wouldn't engage and that's when I noticed the rat nest wiring.

5.7 Olds: I came close to buying one when the Arabs shut the oil off. I had a '76 Ford PU with a 360 that was getting maybe 10 MPG and gas was going up a nickle a week if you could find a station that had it, a big deal back then, while diesel was steady and cheaper. Anyway, GMC dealer was difficult to deal with and totally pissed me off. Tires on '80 were smaller than '79 and looked lost in the wheel wells so I asked for a quote to up the size to the '79 size and the quote was outrageous. I could have bought them at a tire store for half the price and had the takeoffs too, so I cancelled the order. At the time anything that would get good mileage had additional dealer markup on the sticker which I refused to pay. I was based at PHL for Eastern and really didn't need a PU so bought a Toyota Celica for list at a dealer who declared he wouldn't add anything to list. Was a great car!

I've seen "professional" installers use them because they are cheap and easy.

You don't need to have salt for them to give trouble...

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So suppose you are aloft in your bucket truck when it blows a hose, then what? I have considered one, it sure would be handy on this house in particular, but the maintenance on something that sits 362 days a year seems daunting. 

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1 minute ago, vtfireman85 said:

So suppose you are aloft in your bucket truck when it blows a hose, then what? I have considered one, it sure would be handy on this house in particular, but the maintenance on something that sits 362 days a year seems daunting. 

Double acting checks on all cylinders. You can take the hoses off and it won't come down.

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12 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

So suppose you are aloft in your bucket truck when it blows a hose, then what? I have considered one, it sure would be handy on this house in particular, but the maintenance on something that sits 362 days a year seems daunting. 

It takes something catastrophic for that to happen. 

Been a number of years ago now. The town my address is from had a old Consumers Power bucket truck ( Pretty sure it was a GMC Brigader) for putting up banners, street lights, Christmas lights etc. They were downtown putting up a banner when the engine compartment burst into flames. Before the fire department got there and got it out the whole front of the truck was fully ablaze. There were 2 guys up in the bucket that were perfectly fine. Bucket was up high enough that the fire didn't get them and the bucket never dropped. Trust me that truck was toast when they got it out but the bucket never dropped 

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1 minute ago, Reichow7120 said:

It takes something catastrophic for that to happen. 

Been a number of years ago now. The town my address is from had a old Consumers Power bucket truck ( Pretty sure it was a GMC Brigader) for putting up banners, street lights, Christmas lights etc. They were downtown putting up a banner when the engine compartment burst into flames. Before the fire department got there and got it out the whole front of the truck was fully ablaze. There were 2 guys up in the bucket that were perfectly fine. Bucket was up high enough that the fire didn't get them and the bucket never dropped. Trust me that truck was toast when they got it out but the bucket never dropped 

That's scary. 

Trucks on fire and no way to get away!

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That’s about as scary as being in a skid steer with a cab when it catches on fire. A local guy had a at the time new tracked Bobcat. He was running it when he suddenly realized it was on fire. About that time he lost the controls and it died. The loader was right in front of the door and the engine compartment behind the cab was on fire. He said there was some pretty tense moments before he got the door kicked off of it and crawled over the loader. 

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56 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

That’s about as scary as being in a skid steer with a cab when it catches on fire. A local guy had a at the time new tracked Bobcat. He was running it when he suddenly realized it was on fire. About that time he lost the controls and it died. The loader was right in front of the door and the engine compartment behind the cab was on fire. He said there was some pretty tense moments before he got the door kicked off of it and crawled over the loader. 

Pays to read the operators manual, any bobcat with pilot or electronic controls has an emergency boom release pull knob to lower it.  Tees right into the cylinder up line and dumps to sump

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9 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

So suppose you are aloft in your bucket truck when it blows a hose, then what? I have considered one, it sure would be handy on this house in particular, but the maintenance on something that sits 362 days a year seems daunting. 

 

9 hours ago, snoshoe said:

Double acting checks on all cylinders. You can take the hoses off and it won't come down.

Exactly. It takes pressure to release the check valves so no pressure, no movement, the cylinder is essentially locked in place. The exception is when the piston seal fails and then it can drift down. I had the lower boom seal fail. At first it would start to drift and a quick bit of up would set it but shortly thereafter it gave up and wouldn't hold. Where the cylinder was attached to the turret is two pins into a trunnion, pins internally threaded for removal. Well, I fabricated a puller with grade 8 rod but couldn't get the pins out, so I fabricated a pin spanner to disassemble it in place.  I ran the boom up and rested it against a convenient maple and was able to take the rod and piston out for the hydraulic shop to reseal. Cylinder barrel was perfect so it was a good fix.

I have been stranded twice. Once next to the house while painting, luckily next to a window that my wife let me in. One of the bucket control lines blew in that case. Sun gets them and it had been spliced a few times. Eventually I replaced all of them when a squirrel nested in the boom and she, or her babies, gnawed through them. Nearly 500' of 5/16 air brake tubing. Any squirrel going near that truck now does it at great peril.  The other time it stranded me is due to the keyway in the hydraulic pump being worn to nothing and failing. My wife and FIL got me down with an extension ladder. I had replaced that key when it broke several years ago, no stranding. The keyway was worn then and the key sheared. When it failed again it did it with such gusto that it pushed the pump off the mount breaking both grade 8 bolts!

If I don't find a replacement truck I'll have to spend some money on fixing the pump and PTO. What I like about this old truck is that it's strictly hydro-mechanical The only electricity needed is to start the engine, all controls are hydraulic.

I'm ordering a self rescue kit in the meantime. Right now I won't go up unless my wife is home to answer my distress call

 

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