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Sitting 886


Lastholme

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Have an acquaintance that is totally city , who purchased a farm property(rents the land out) who purchased an 886, with a new snow blower to clean his lane, then hired his neighbour to clean it with his equipment. 

 

The neighbour passed away this fall & now he called me to find a mechanic to do the maintenance on it, good luck! the quickest one that could come is a 3 week wait.

I can change fluids (50+ years farming), & it's not hard to find specs for tractors online, but what process would be best to go through,  start it first to warm fluids after checking levels, or change fluids first, then try to start.

It's been sitting in a garage for about 10 years, never used.

Thanks for any info

 

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Check fluids first and make sure it runs before he invest in fresh fluids and filters. Probably be wise to crack oil plug a little before attempting to crank it over to check for coolant in oil. Then the owner know more about what he has. That's pretty much how I'd start. If everything seems good I'd change engine oil when warm. 

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2 hours ago, Wisconsin Ron said:

Check fluids first and make sure it runs before he invest in fresh fluids and filters. Probably be wise to crack oil plug a little before attempting to crank it over to check for coolant in oil. Then the owner know more about what he has. That's pretty much how I'd start. If everything seems good I'd change engine oil when warm. 

X2

At least it's been in under a roof.

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Not to high jack this thread but what’s the advantage of warming up the fluids before changing them?  Is hot fluid all over the internals going to drain faster than fluids that have been sitting close to the lowest spot in the reservoirs for hours/weeks/months?  IDK?  Doesn’t circulating fluids carry debris throughout the engine that now has to migrate to where it already was before it was warmed up?  IDK?  Am I’m the only one not worried about warming up engine oil & tranny fluid immediately before draining?  Thanks fot another great discussion!

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1 hour ago, ComancheStarFarms said:

Not to high jack this thread but what’s the advantage of warming up the fluids before changing them?  Is hot fluid all over the internals going to drain faster than fluids that have been sitting close to the lowest spot in the reservoirs for hours/weeks/months?  IDK?  Doesn’t circulating fluids carry debris throughout the engine that now has to migrate to where it already was before it was warmed up?  IDK?  Am I’m the only one not worried about warming up engine oil & tranny fluid immediately before draining?  Thanks fot another great discussion!

Check to make sure all fluids aren't radically contaminated and then run until warm to enhance flow and agitate the gunk as HyTek wrote. Wouldn't recommend a hard pull detail just a thorough warm up. Same principle as a normal engine oil change to get all the typical contaminants in suspension. With that 886 a good warmup and then a full speed romp down the road and back to splash oil on all the powertrain components and the inside of the castings.

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11 hours ago, Lastholme said:

Have an acquaintance that is totally city , who purchased a farm property(rents the land out) who purchased an 886, with a new snow blower to clean his lane, then hired his neighbour to clean it with his equipment. 

 

The neighbour passed away this fall & now he called me to find a mechanic to do the maintenance on it, good luck! the quickest one that could come is a 3 week wait.

I can change fluids (50+ years farming), & it's not hard to find specs for tractors online, but what process would be best to go through,  start it first to warm fluids after checking levels, or change fluids first, then try to start.

It's been sitting in a garage for about 10 years, never used.

Thanks for any info

 

Kinda creepy that he called you after he passed!

Good advice above.

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17 hours ago, ComancheStarFarms said:

Not to high jack this thread but what’s the advantage of warming up the fluids before changing them?  Is hot fluid all over the internals going to drain faster than fluids that have been sitting close to the lowest spot in the reservoirs for hours/weeks/months?  IDK?  Doesn’t circulating fluids carry debris throughout the engine that now has to migrate to where it already was before it was warmed up?  IDK?  Am I’m the only one not worried about warming up engine oil & tranny fluid immediately before draining?  Thanks fot another great discussion!

If you think about it, the "debris" is already in there and "circulating" every time you run the tractor. It doesn't just magically appear when you go to change the oil. One more run isn't going to change anything.

I was taught to change the oil HOT. The idea there to "stir up" the "debris" so it flows out instead of settling in the pan. After multiple first-degree burns from oil changes, I said "eff that" and change all my oil cold. 

In the grand scheme of things, I don't think it matters much. If the engine blows up after you changed the oil cold, you had bigger problems going on behind the scenes.

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It would be a good idea to make sure it runs before you change fluids. Why do all that and find something weird that causes you to have to drain something out after changing it. Nobody said oil has to be scalding hot for it to be drained but it does drain out better warm 


 

 

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So checked it out today, a bigger problem than just the oils, which looked as new & all to the high mark on the dipsticks, as he said, he purchased it then promptly parked it. Both batteries dead, figured that, and a flat back tire, probably for the past 10 years, as the rim looks cooked, hopefully it hasn't cooked the tire too.

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42 minutes ago, Lastholme said:

So checked it out today, a bigger problem than just the oils, which looked as new & all to the high mark on the dipsticks, as he said, he purchased it then promptly parked it. Both batteries dead, figured that, and a flat back tire, probably for the past 10 years, as the rim looks cooked, hopefully it hasn't cooked the tire too.

Just sell it to me for scrap price.Why go through the aggravation.

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On 11/22/2023 at 6:21 PM, acem said:

Kinda creepy that he called you after he passed!

Good advice above.

I had to reread that a couple times too before I got the right "who died".....

I'd pick up a couple batteries, have the farm tire dealer fix the flat (if its not just needing air).... and see if it cranks.    Hopefully its got real farm diesel in it not OTR bio-diesel (still working on a 7.3 that sat 10 years and it gummed up the entire fuel system....)

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Dump a bottle of Stanadyne Diesel Fuel Conditioner in the fuel tank before you start it.

The older fuel should be all right but it can't hurt to try and be safe.

Cheap insurance.

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actually, one good Gp31 battery (maybe already on hand at your place?) should turn it over fast enough to start it w/o buying expensive 6v batteries just to investigate. tire can be fixed after you make sure it runs. If tires are loaded and sitting for 10 years, good chance a new water valve core will let it hold air.

I'm betting it will run, even after 10 years of sitting under cover.

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10 hours ago, ny bill o said:

actually, one good Gp31 battery (maybe already on hand at your place?) should turn it over fast enough to start it w/o buying expensive 6v batteries just to investigate. tire can be fixed after you make sure it runs. If tires are loaded and sitting for 10 years, good chance a new water valve core will let it hold air.

I'm betting it will run, even after 10 years of sitting under cover.

The 86 series all had 12V batteries from new.

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4 minutes ago, Drysleeves said:

But not group 31's. Smaller frame top clamp over post style group 24's....I think.

I always put two 31s in them. Yes, they fit just fine.  They aren’t much more money than a 24. 

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9 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

The 86 series all had 12V batteries from new.

Brain Fart. I should have known that- see my 1086 and the 3588s.

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41 minutes ago, ny bill o said:

Brain Fart. I should have known that- see my 1086 and the 3588s.

One group 31 is plenty for an 886. Only reason to have two is to occupy the second positive battery terminal so you don't have to tape it up and/or risk it flopping around under there and shorting out. Well, I guess also if you like to sit there and listen to the radio for hours on end, or run the headlights in the dark with the engine off.

I put two "Value" group 24's in my 1586 cost <$100 at the time. Group 31 was $149.

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