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Stolen off of FB….915 combine


Big Bud guy

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The 403 was still offered up until 71-72 when the 6/715s were introduced. Late-production 403s are easy to spot...they had a white cab like the early 715s, but the model # was still in black #s, like the 8/915 in acem's buyer's guide pictures above. I've seen a handful of white cab 403s while doing service calls through the years. 

This may have given IH the blue print for keeping 715 production going for a couple years after the Axial-Flows were introduced. 

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There was a 915 here until we stopped farming. I really liked it. Mostly for the sound of the straight piped DT414 and the look of it. The cleaning fan was not the best design, it wasn't as easy to work on compared to a 1460, but it did well with a 20' 820 header in beans, wheat, or oats, and would eat corn well with the 4 row 844. Just don't overload it and fill the air plenum with grain.  It replaced a turned up 815 when it plugged and ruined the straw walkers and cranks. The 815 was easier to set, and the straw spreader did a better job than the 9. Both were awesome in muddy conditions! The treaded rear tires would keep turning and keep from getting buried when backing out of some ruts, and made for better steering. 

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21 minutes ago, SDman said:

The 403 was still offered up until 71-72 when the 6/715s were introduced. Late-production 403s are easy to spot...they had a white cab like the early 715s, but the model # was still in black #s, like the 8/915 in acem's buyer's guide pictures above. I've seen a handful of white cab 403s while doing service calls through the years. 

This may have given IH the blue print for keeping 715 production going for a couple years after the Axial-Flows were introduced. 

615/715 were the cover feature for the fall '72 Buyers Guide.

A '67 model white cab 403 arrived here in the fall of '68 to replace a 203. That upgrade was on par with the '79 1460 replacing the '75 715.

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3 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

There was a 915 here until we stopped farming. I really liked it. Mostly for the sound of the straight piped DT414 and the look of it. The cleaning fan was not the best design, it wasn't as easy to work on compared to a 1460, but it did well with a 20' 820 header in beans, wheat, or oats, and would eat corn well with the 4 row 844. Just don't overload it and fill the air plenum with grain.  It replaced a turned up 815 when it plugged and ruined the straw walkers and cranks. The 815 was easier to set, and the straw spreader did a better job than the 9. Both were awesome in muddy conditions! The treaded rear tires would keep turning and keep from getting buried when backing out of some ruts, and made for better steering. 

915-2.jpg

Dad had an 815 from 79 to 84 or so. It was a really nice combine and treated him well. He bought a 1460 and ran the 815 and 1460. He had to sell the 815 then he bought a 915 2 years later. We usually picked up swaths with the combines back then but we would straight cut also. Swaths feed into machine so much better if the person did a good job of swathing. There is no other sound like a 915 working after dark you can just hear the power. We bent the walkers on our 915. If you look in parts book there are rubber laps that bolt to end of walkers and drape over straw chute. This was for corn and soybean option but worked for kochia also after we put those on we never had problems again. It would wrap weeds over the chute and hang up there.

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Another reason for bent walkers is worn and rounded over chopper knives. Instead of pulling and chopping the crop, they beat on it and slow down the progress of material. Job one every year was to check the paddles over the walkers to be sure that the alarm would sound!

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3 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

Another reason for bent walkers is worn and rounded over chopper knives. Instead of pulling and chopping the crop, they beat on it and slow down the progress of material. Job one every year was to check the paddles over the walkers to be sure that the alarm would sound!

Exactly check the the walker alarm every now and then.

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On 11/13/2023 at 7:18 PM, Big Bud guy said:

How tall did you guys all cut the stubble?   Since the Massey 21A days we have always taken the trucks into the field right to the combines.  Only fires I have seen started is when someone drove a pickup or car into the field.  

I suppose the stubble was 6" to a foot tall most of the time. This was back when most wheat was swathed/windrowed. If you swathed it, then had a week of 95-100 degree heat on all that now dead stubble and the windrows themselves, that stubble turned into kindling and offered to be deadly fuel for a fire.

Now you pull into that field with your V-8 gas burner trucks with any of the following problems with your exhaust system: cracked manifolds, blown out exhaust donuts, an exhaust "Y" pipe with holes in it, mufflers with holes in them, or just about any exhaust that ran with leaded gas all the time, and you just brought a match that was waiting to ignite the fuel. Also, most trucks at that time had mufflers hanging dangerously close to the ground to get as much heat out of the engine compartment as possible....they were always running right next to that dry stubble. 

You learned in a hurry to be very careful where you put your trucks in a stubble field at wheat harvest.

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55 minutes ago, SDman said:

I suppose the stubble was 6" to a foot tall most of the time. This was back when most wheat was swathed/windrowed. If you swathed it, then had a week of 95-100 degree heat on all that now dead stubble and the windrows themselves, that stubble turned into kindling and offered to be deadly fuel for a fire.

Now you pull into that field with your V-8 gas burner trucks with any of the following problems with your exhaust system: cracked manifolds, blown out exhaust donuts, an exhaust "Y" pipe with holes in it, mufflers with holes in them, or just about any exhaust that ran with leaded gas all the time, and you just brought a match that was waiting to ignite the fuel. Also, most trucks at that time had mufflers hanging dangerously close to the ground to get as much heat out of the engine compartment as possible....they were always running right next to that dry stubble. 

You learned in a hurry to be very careful where you put your trucks in a stubble field at wheat harvest.

 

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We have those same conditions too maybe not up to 100F but close.  There are times when it gets hot and real windy we will stop for an afternoon.  Never had to do that until we started running rotaries.  Now I don’t mean any disrespect to anybody on here but I would and did get my ass chewed out if I left stubble a foot tall either in the combine or swather.  Old man hated tall stubble 

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16 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

 

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We have those same conditions too maybe not up to 100F but close.  There are times when it gets hot and real windy we will stop for an afternoon.  Never had to do that until we started running rotaries.  Now I don’t mean any disrespect to anybody on here but I would and did get my ass chewed out if I left stubble a foot tall either in the combine or swather.  Old man hated tall stubble 

My dad was always the exact opposite. He never wanted more straw cut than the minimum. It’s probably a lot different here I would guess. In good wheat the walkers would be overloaded because of too much MOG if you cut the straw short. When I was young and I saw my dad coming I knew he was going to tell me I was running it all out the back no matter what I did though. We leave straw waist high if we are getting all the wheat.

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39 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

My dad was always the exact opposite. He never wanted more straw cut than the minimum. It’s probably a lot different here I would guess. In good wheat the walkers would be overloaded because of too much MOG if you cut the straw short. When I was young and I saw my dad coming I knew he was going to tell me I was running it all out the back no matter what I did though. We leave straw waist high if we are getting all the wheat.

Our wheat yields were typically 20-30 bpa in those years.  We did a lot of swathing back in those years and we always cut the stubble short because of you left it too tall, the windrow would work it’s way down to the ground so then you would run dirt through the combine too.  So yes there was lots of straw going through the machine but there is a reason why Massey was so popular in wheat country.  The walkers were wider than the cylinder making room for the straw  to spread out.  That Massey in the bottom picture of my uncle is driving a Super 92.  The cylinder is 37” wide but the walkers are 48”.  Basically it has the front of a 403 and the ass end of a 503.  

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Our situation was probably somewhere in between what you guys are talking about. For swathing, you probably would cut lower for the reason BigBudGuy mentioned...you didn't want the windrow falling down through the stubble.

In the early 1980s, straight cutting became more popular...especially once we could raise winter wheat without having it get winterkilled every year. Winter wheat would get a head start on the weeds in the spring so your chances of straight cutting were better with WW, also WW was usually planted on fallow ground so it had more nutrients to get it taller as well. In the case of straight cutting, we usually wouldn't take any more straw than what was necessary. Guys would want the stubble as tall as possible to catch snow during the winter as well.

Spring wheat was usually planted on last year's corn ground, and it didn't get as good of a start as the WW did....so your chances of swathing SW was much better. And then my Dad had hogs at the time, so we were always needing to save some straw so that factored in sometimes as well.

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Winter wheat is grown here but it's not a big crop. Always been straight cut as long as I've ever heard. 

We always cut as high as possible. Trucks are mostly kept on the road because our ground can be muddy. We never seemed to have trouble with vehicles catching wheat fields on fire until catalytic converters came out. A neighbor caught his on fire with one. I think it was his wife's car but that was many moons ago.

I guess they run hot. 

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Talking about tall stubble made me think of these photos, probably from 1972. Stubble doesn’t look all that tall which I’m sure is why the trucks are in the field. This is great-grandpas Gleaner F and IH A-160. I think the other truck is a mid 40’s Chevy by the looks of it. 
I’m gonna assume all these had gas engines?
This is winter wheat planted with IH 150’s. 

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Just so happens when I was leaving work today, I  come across this truck in our "waiting to come in" line...a good, old C70 Chevy with a 366. This truck is setup the way many tandem axle grain trucks were back in the 1980s, complete with the exhaust/mufflers that most had. You can see that there is not a lot of clearance there....driving this rig out in the middle of a stubble field wouldn't win you many friends.  Doesn't  help that the gas tanks are in close proximity to the mufflers, either. Also, you have to remember a lot of times we dropped the straw in the window so it could be baled for the hogs, and also the straw choppers of the time didn't spread residue any wider than the combine itself, so the straw on top of the stubble was too close for comfort many a time to the exhaust as well.

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I thought I should reply since we are talking about 15 series...😆 

 

I finished the  last few rounds of corn with the "Ole 815" fall of 2003. In memory of my Dad that passed few months earlier, Aug of 2003. Combine was siting in shed, had not been used for several years. Mom jus didn't understand why I would waist a whole day getn it ready,  maybe it was more than that,  jus to make a few rounds with it.....well those of you who know, well you jus know why i would.

It was bought new by Dad,  1976 model 815 Diesel

I have video of it combining corn in 1991 running in the snow conditions during the Halloween Ice storm.

I still have the engine  but hauled the rest to salvage yard.

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Dad had an Oliver that I just barely recall when I was very young. Traded it for a new uni.

I don't recall a lot of 15 series in my area when I was a kid, tho there had to be some. Seems like when the 4400 series deere came out there were a lot of green combines around my area for a while there.  We had a fairly good size green dealer in town and another 12 miles east and west from them. So I suppose that had something to do with it too? There was a red dealer here too and 1  close to 1 of the other green dealers as well. 

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Here is our 1965 Loadstar 1600.  This and a 68’ Ford N-600 were are two main trucks for hauling from the combine to the farm for 25 years and for all other work until we started buying diesel trucks.  Can’t see it very good but the exhaust is pointed straight back.  

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There is a 58 F 600 in the neighborhood yet that had Y block transplant in the early 70's . They turned the exhaust to come up with pipe poking thru the hood. It has since been changed back to under cassis exhaust. As it has been 20 years since it has been in the stubble. 

We always drove into the stubble with the gas powered trucks. But the instant you stopped you got out and took a shovel and made sure no stubble within 6 inch to a foot of the exhaust pipe. The only fires I can think of with a truck was parking brake not release.

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