Jump to content

Stolen off of FB….915 combine


Big Bud guy

Recommended Posts

11 minutes ago, SDman said:

Looks like the 782 corn head that came out with the Hi-Profile 915s was only available as an 8 row 20" head. The first IH 8 row head on 30" rows was the 883.

For those of you that have it, the 1977 IH Buyer's Guide has a beautiful picture of a 915 with an 883 corn head operating in "3 Is" corn(Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana) in the combine/grain harvesting section. Always thought that picture was one of IH's best action shots.

782 corn head #2.png

782 corn head #1.png

Do the 7 series corn heads have gearboxes or a bunch of chains?

A neighbor had one with chains and didn't like it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

I know nothing about this photo. Just took it from FB because I thought it was neat. 
915 and 883 8 row corn head. 30 inch spacing? 
70EE9D66-BDE5-44FB-B93C-37311FBCEFD4.thumb.jpeg.ca7235ef9bdce1ceef53afe517f8d11a.jpeg

Really like the old BC160? Truck. A neighbor had a red 10 wheeler when I was a kid. 

The 915 looks to have a grain tank cover very similar to the one on my 815 parts combine. I bought it from the original owner and I'm pretty sure he bought the cover assembly from some company that made them. I'll try to get a pic.

All the 915s I've been around had spike tooth cylinders for rice. They really tear corn up.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

I know nothing about this photo. Just took it from FB because I thought it was neat. 
915 and 883 8 row corn head. 30 inch spacing? 
70EE9D66-BDE5-44FB-B93C-37311FBCEFD4.thumb.jpeg.ca7235ef9bdce1ceef53afe517f8d11a.jpeg

883 was 28 or 30 inch rows while the 884 was 36 or 38 and I think even 40. Same nomenclature applied for all the other 800, 900, and 1000 series heads except the 5 & 7 row models which were wide space only.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Grandpa traded in a 403 on a used 815 gas in February 1980 (the same day he bought the Hydro 186 and 2450). Then in 1982 he traded that on an 815 diesel. Dad said the gas one used too much gas is why Grandpa traded it so fast. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, acem said:

Do the 7 series corn heads have gearboxes or a bunch of chains?

A neighbor had one with chains and didn't like it.

Dont know the answer to that, but i do know it sure seems like the 763 out weighed the 503. Could not imagine the wt of the 782 head. Would need to park an "M" on the back hood for a counter wt in our hills !     😃

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, 1480x3 said:

Also i we never had any final drive/axle issues on that 503, even ran duals in wet falls. 18.4x26 

We never had final drive problems with the 915. They were exact same as dads 1460. The 915 had a hopper extension a 1x12 on top so it held 175 bushels of wheat full. Dads 1460 was 185 full but we had final drive problems with the 1460 more than once. 915 had smaller tire but a bit wider stance maybe that and the weight being less helped. The 915 ran the same header as the 1460 for years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, dale560 said:

We never had final drive problems with the 915. They were exact same as dads 1460. The 915 had a hopper extension a 1x12 on top so it held 175 bushels of wheat full. Dads 1460 was 185 full but we had final drive problems with the 1460 more than once. 915 had smaller tire but a bit wider stance maybe that and the weight being less helped. The 915 ran the same header as the 1460 for years.

My 915 was trouble free in the finals as well also, & had a foot extension. 3200 hrs no issues. Found rolling torque out of specks on 1 of the 1480s and the 2188 doing preventive checks though but never had a failure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always wondered what happened to the unique set up of the 815/915 combine’s steering columns?  I never drove one but it seems to me like a great idea to increase visibility and comfort? Anyone have any input on this? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Cool1566 said:

I always wondered what happened to the unique set up of the 815/915 combine’s steering columns?  I never drove one but it seems to me like a great idea to increase visibility and comfort? Anyone have any input on this? 

Gleaner L and M had the same steering system and also like IH went away from it.  I’m guessing maybe the complexity wasn’t worth it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/14/2023 at 1:16 PM, acem said:

Do the 7 series corn heads have gearboxes or a bunch of chains?

A neighbor had one with chains and didn't like it.

The 700 series did use gearboxes, but I don't think you would consider them low-profile row units like you see on the 800 series and newer heads.

Reminds me of a comment one of my old neighbors out at the farm used to say about the Deere 40 series cornheads when they came out in the early 1970s. When they were introduced at the Deere dealer, everyone said there was no way they would ever work, because there was nothing to them. All the extra drives, chains, etc. used on previous cornheads were gone. I think most farmers would say the 40 series JD corn heads were a pretty good outfit overall.

I was told when IH came out with automatic reset plows, they were met with similar resistance from farmers....they would never work because there was not enough "stuff" to make the design work overall. Again, I think they went over well with their customers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, 766 Man said:

  The 6 row head that came with our Gleaner L had all kinds of chains on it.  It did OK but I sure don't miss it when I think about the 643 corn head on the 6620 combine today.  

In the 80s one day a fellow with a 6 row gleaner hd was at our local farm store and asked if he could buy bulk chain for it by the mile   😃

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started on a MF 92 hillside with only 14 foot header, it always bothered me being 3 foot from one end and 10 to the other end. Then years latter operated a JD 6622 with a 22 foot header the same deal way too much header off to the right. I started a fire with the 6622 cutting down grain in rocks. Bent the last guard on the right end of header in the crop divider. Got the knife section and guard hot enough to set the chaff to soldering. Never had any idea anything was wrong until I had flames. Still no idea what caused the fire until combine was parked out in some summer fallow land. Just felt better sitting in the middle on JD 95 H's and Gleaner MH and MH's I operated.

But I will give credit to engine forward, putting the weight being a plus.  The JD 6622 would out climb any other combine I been around in the hill here. But other opening up field we used the leveler and cut on the contour as much as possible. You loose grain going up and down.

With all the gas engine combines you all had everywhere else, after about 1965 or so not a gas engine combine was sold in sidehill country here. Got me wondering why. Partly could be all tractors where crawlers until the big 4x4 showed, and that meant diesel power from the 1940's on.  Or was it just the dealers.

 

I learned a lot keep the discussion going.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, ray54 said:

With all the gas engine combines you all had everywhere else, after about 1965 or so not a gas engine combine was sold in sidehill country here. Got me wondering why. Partly could be all tractors where crawlers until the big 4x4 showed, and that meant diesel power from the 1940's on.  Or was it just the dealers.

I only speak for my area when I say this were we seed half the farm and fallow half.  I think part of the reason gas combines were common up to the 70s is because guys felt they didn't need the economy of the diesel for a machine that is run for 2 maybe 3 weeks a year vs tractors that got the snot ran out of them from April to September with hundreds of hours each year.  You went over the crop once with the combine but went over the fallow at least 4 times a year plus you had to work ahead of the drills each spring so thats 5 times you went over half the farm plowing.  The wheat belt started embracing the diesel engine in tractors almost as soon as they became viable.  We bough our first one in 47' when grandpa bought a TD 14 crawler.  It replaced a Cat R4 crawler.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

I only speak for my area when I say this were we seed half the farm and fallow half.  I think part of the reason gas combines were common up to the 70s is because guys felt they didn't need the economy of the diesel for a machine that is run for 2 maybe 3 weeks a year vs tractors that got the snot ran out of them from April to September with hundreds of hours each year.  You went over the crop once with the combine but went over the fallow at least 4 times a year plus you had to work ahead of the drills each spring so thats 5 times you went over half the farm plowing.  The wheat belt started embracing the diesel engine in tractors almost as soon as they became viable.  We bough our first one in 47' when grandpa bought a TD 14 crawler.  It replaced a Cat R4 crawler.  

  My recollection is guys were so hung up over the purchase price that saving a few hundred dollars up front was a big deal.  That they did not see that they were buying the difference at the fuel pump and then some.  Kind of like a hidden installment plan.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harvest here would often go well into January or February. Combines could not handle mud on moldboard plowed ground. There was no bottom. You would have to wait until the ground froze to finish harvesting. This was also cattle country and tractors were used for winter feeding. Tractors and combines were expected to run in very cold temperatures. Diesels back then were hard to start, especially in a remote area. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well another oddity of my world other than certain windy areas, the weather gave you all summer to take wheat,barley and oats off. So was not unusual to put 500 hours on a combine in a season. The biggest I was part of was we started June 6 and cut barley mostly until about the first week of September. That was 6 days a week be at the bosses at 8 am load fuel in service truck stop at the dealer for any needed parts, blow and grease 2 combines and the dew would be off and away we went until 8 pm. Go home and start over. Then the last few days in Sept we started cutting safflower cutting into mid November. That was a lot of days in a combine.  We did move around the area a lot, we roaded them 40 miles at time several different times. Taking away separator hours, but the engine sure as heck was running full out anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are not my pictures but they belong to a gentleman in Western NY who bought these 2 915 with factory tracks brand new. Too good not to share. 

IMG_0167.jpeg

IMG_0168.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, ChrisNY said:

These are not my pictures but they belong to a gentleman in Western NY who bought these 2 915 with factory tracks brand new. Too good not to share. 

IMG_0167.jpeg

IMG_0168.jpeg

Resource auction in grand forks nd had a sale a couple years ago in northwest mn. They were a wet area but I think they grew some type rice there. He had a few 915 on tracks factory setups and some setups that were full track with no rear axles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, ChrisNY said:

These are not my pictures but they belong to a gentleman in Western NY who bought these 2 915 with factory tracks brand new. Too good not to share. 

IMG_0167.jpeg

IMG_0168.jpeg

Background combine looks to have duals. Only 915 I've ever seen with that setup. Both appear to have Mug Hog rear axles. Turret auger on the tracker and both have old school High Profile style ladders. 800 corn heads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...