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Stolen off of FB….915 combine


Big Bud guy

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6 hours ago, dale560 said:

As I mentioned here the 503 was so well liked up here most guys skipped over the 15 series or they went with the 715. I know there was at least 15 or 20 503s still working fields around 1994 or 5. My buddy has 2 newer JD combines now but he went from 3 503s to  3 JD 9600s .  They still ran one 503 alongside the first 9600 he had.   A lot of the neighbors either retired with 914s or traded them in on mid 80s combines. By time those guys were quitting with the 503s most had bought a few combines to use as spares or part them out to go to the v belt type drive.  
 

  We used to grind valves  a few gas type combines when we had time during harvest. On the 503 we used to pull head off , grind valves and reinstall in 3 hours. Most guys had a bucket of extra valve springs and valves and stuff. We always kept valve seals and stuff on hand and they always had head gaskets around. Even the Chrysler and Ford v8s on other combines would get a head pulled and fixed every now and then.

The 03 series were will regarded here too.  In fact the neighbor I got my 715 from, his father ran a local custom cutting ring with five 403s.  Then when he quit that he got rid of them all for on 6600 which my neighbor still has.  Hopefully I can get that someday too.   But for some reason IH conventionals kinda ended with the 03s "here".  All these 15 series must be in other parts of the country because that picture I posted of the 915 in my other junkyard thread was about the 3rd one I have ever seen and that came from out of the area.  Never have located 815 and have seen a few other 715s.  15 series just weren't popular.  **** there were more White type combines around here.  Massey was killing it with the 510s and 750/60 and so was JD with the 00 series.  Gleaner had a loyal following too.  

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6 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

The 03 series were will regarded here too.  In fact the neighbor I got my 715 from, his father ran a local custom cutting ring with five 403s.  Then when he quit that he got rid of them all for on 6600 which my neighbor still has.  Hopefully I can get that someday too.   But for some reason IH conventionals kinda ended with the 03s "here".  All these 15 series must be in other parts of the country because that picture I posted of the 915 in my other junkyard thread was about the 3rd one I have ever seen and that came from out of the area.  Never have located 815 and have seen a few other 715s.  15 series just weren't popular.  **** there were more White type combines around here.  Massey was killing it with the 510s and 750/60 and so was JD with the 00 series.  Gleaner had a loyal following too.  

Here it was evenly split between gleaner , Massey and John Deere. Not many white combines other than neighbor had an Oliver 5542. The versatile 420 was pretty popular in this area and the pull type model of it. The biggest number though was the 914 pulltype they were every where. 

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8 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Is that why the 914 and 715 were made up until like 1979? I assumed it was because IH didn’t have the 1420 and 1482 ready by 1977-78. If the 914 and 715’s were that popular that makes more sense.  

Well, let's put it this way.....if IH had as much market share with the 8/915s as they did with the 715 and 914, they probably would not have put as much emphasis on the development of the Axial-Flow as they did. Why put all the $$$, time and effort into a new machine if the old one was doing well? Also, I'm sure IH was taking a cautionary path with the Axial-Flows...better to gamble new machines in a market you were struggling at first, then to knock your best sellers in the head and gamble on something new which would have happened if you retired the 715/914 and replaced them with the 1420/1482 right away. 

You have to remember, the market for both the 715 and 914 was for "economy-minded" farmers, people that wanted a no-frills machine that just did its job without a lot of expense. I'm sure the $$$ for R & D on both of those machines was minimal at this time...the 715 traced its lineage all the way back to the 151 which came out in 1957-58....the 914 was introduced in 1970. I think part of the problem with the 1420 & 1482 was that they were not built to be a cheap machine...in addition to being in a market that was shrinking for both.

Like dale560 says, IH 914s were everywhere in the Dakotas in the late 1970s/early 1980s. Either you owned one...or you knew somebody who did.

I can remember working for a customer back in the mid-1990s who had a 1460 with some problems. I was having some problems troubleshooting what was going on with his machine...and he was running out of patience with me. He chuckled to me that he was "gonna have to dig out the old 914 in the trees and get something done since this thing won't run for me". Ouch....that hurt!!!

Best story about 914s I've ever heard was from our partsman. In the mid/late 1970s he worked for the IH dealer in Watertown, SD as a mechanic. He tells the story about the owner of the dealership had a new 914 combine sitting in the shop. He sold that same combine to no less than 6 different guys in one day. He spent the next 2 days begging for 914s from every other IH dealer in NE South Dakota trying to get the other five 914s for his customers. 

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If IH would have made a 15 series version of the 503, like the 715 was of the 403, they would have sold more combines around here at least.  They would have had combine to compete with the MF 510 and JD 6600 with a little bit more reliability then the bigger 15s at a cheaper price then the 6600.  

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50 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Here it was evenly split between gleaner , Massey and John Deere. Not many white combines other than neighbor had an Oliver 5542. The versatile 420 was pretty popular in this area and the pull type model of it. The biggest number though was the 914 pulltype they were every where. 

We had 2 Versatile dealers with one being very aggressive and neither one sold any Versatile combines.  

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Never even heard of a versatile combine until I was on here. Just versatile tractors down here.

There were a couple 403s running here until the last of the Yates family quit farming. It had automatic header control. It had a Ridgid head with fingers underneath that controlled a valve mounted on the end of the header. Similar to the one I have used on my 1460 with 810 header but without the cables.

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s-l1600 (3).webp

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On 11/11/2023 at 6:42 PM, Big Bud guy said:

 

IMG_6301.jpeg
 

I didn't know it was that extensive.  I thought they just lowered the machine and the cab a few inches somehow.  My one and only big critique of IH conventionals was the engineers never seemed to know how to make a combine with a lower grain tank and center of gravity like Massey and JD.  Maybe not a big deal to flat landers. 

Initially thought that picture was a 915 but now see it’s a 715. Brings back a memory.

My father was looking for a new combine for the 1976 season. It was going to be either a 915 or 7700. We’d had a 403 since 1974. 
I may not remember this correctly but he told me that the 915 had the same cylinder width as the 815 (48”?) but gave it more horsepower. The 7700 has 55” if I recall correctly.

If all that is correct, in terms of design, I think that is a big difference between the two companies highest capacity machine. This is also in the context of running 5’ rye through in often high humidity conditions. I guess the thinking was more horsepower wasn’t the answer to shoving more material through a narrower thresher. (Good thing the 403 had that manual reverser in that slot on the right side of the header).

Dad bought the 7700. Extremely satisfied. Kept it running until he retired in 2007.

Edited by John Rowehl
Correction
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19 minutes ago, acem said:

I'm not sure of the exact size but I believe the 715 and 815 are the same width as the 403.

39 3/16" wide cylinder. 915 is 48 3/8" like a 503. All of them are 22" diameter. The 815 had more capacity because it had more horsepower, cleaning, and conveying space along with a larger grain tank.

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I remember when a neighbors 815 was the biggest combine in our bottoms. I think their first 815 was the gasser that burned. They replaced it with another 815 with 407 diesel they ran for years. 

It looked bigger than it was because it was so tall. 

 

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44 minutes ago, Drysleeves said:

39 3/16" wide cylinder. 915 is 48 3/8" like a 503. All of them are 22" diameter. The 815 had more capacity because it had more horsepower, cleaning, and conveying space along with a larger grain tank.

If I understand what you wrote correctly, 403, 715 and 815 all had 39 3/16” width cylinder.

503 and 915 48 3/8”

815 had higher capacity over 403 and 715 from higher HP, cleaning etc.

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7 minutes ago, John Rowehl said:

If I understand what you wrote correctly, 403, 715 and 815 all had 39 3/16” width cylinder.

503 and 915 48 3/8”

815 had higher capacity over 403 and 715 from higher HP, cleaning etc.

The 815 has more separation area (about 1,000 more sq inches) leading me to believe it has longer walkers also.  

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The cylinder rasp bars stuck out about inch on each side past the sides of the combine so even thought the cylinder was ~39" on the 715, the concave and the rest of the separator/walkers was actually only ~37".  So the cylinder width is somewhat deceiving on these combines in brochure.  I think the 815/915 were the same way too but not 100% sure.  I know the 503 and 403 had the cylinder bigger then the separator 

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1 hour ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

When did IH release an 8 row 30” head? 

I'm guessing with the intro of the 915.  I know JD offered 8 row 20" for the 105 but I don't think a 30" 8 row didn't come out until the 7700 hit the market which would be fall of 69'.

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1 minute ago, Big Bud guy said:

I'm guessing with the intro of the 915.  I know JD offered 8 row 20" for the 105 but I don't think a 30" 8 row didn't come out until the 7700 hit the market which would be fall of 69'.

There was one 8 row on a 7700 around here when it was new. It was not common at all. Most 7700’s just carried a 6 row here. I have never seen a 915 with an 8 row. 

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17 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

There was one 8 row on a 7700 around here when it was new. It was not common at all. Most 7700’s just carried a 6 row here. I have never seen a 915 with an 8 row. 

I imagine 8 row headers were limited to areas that had lower yields???

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Milo was the grain crop here back then but average corn yields in 1970 were around 75 bushels per acre.

Cotton was the main crop with soybeans, Milo and wheat grown for rotation and as guided by the government regulations. 

Rice didn't come to my area until the late 70s. There was a push for more rice acreage in the 70s and they opened up the allotment/base acerage program.

Most of us forget how much the government used to guide our planting decisions.

 

image.png

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

I imagine 8 row headers were limited to areas that had lower yields???

Most people around here thought 8 row equipment was “too big” at the time. If I ever get around to it I intend to try an 8 row on my 7700 to see what it does. I kept the 8 row corn heads when we went to 12. 

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I know nothing about this photo. Just took it from FB because I thought it was neat. 
915 and 883 8 row corn head. 30 inch spacing? 
70EE9D66-BDE5-44FB-B93C-37311FBCEFD4.thumb.jpeg.ca7235ef9bdce1ceef53afe517f8d11a.jpeg

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1 hour ago, acem said:

Milo was the grain crop here back then but average corn yields in 1970 were around 75 bushels per acre.

Cotton was the main crop with soybeans, Milo and wheat grown for rotation and as guided by the government regulations. 

Rice didn't come to my area until the late 70s. There was a push for more rice acreage in the 70s and they opened up the allotment/base acerage program.

Most of us forget how much the government used to guide our planting decisions.

 

image.png

I know today is different than the 80's, but I think the government still affects our planting decisions quite a lot.  Government subsidized crop insurance has a huge affect here in the Midwest.  Maybe it doesn't affect planting decisions as much as it affects land prices.

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Looks like the 782 corn head that came out with the Hi-Profile 915s was only available as an 8 row 20" head. The first IH 8 row head on 30" rows was the 883.

For those of you that have it, the 1977 IH Buyer's Guide has a beautiful picture of a 915 with an 883 corn head operating in "3 Is" corn(Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana) in the combine/grain harvesting section. Always thought that picture was one of IH's best action shots.

782 corn head #2.png

782 corn head #1.png

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