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Stolen off of FB….915 combine


Big Bud guy

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In regards to the early 8/915s, why do the lights on top of the cab look like an afterthought? They almost look like a regular 110v bulb that screws into a household light socket, whereas the later 15 series combines used the more familiar sealed beam lights everything else used at the time.

Also, in light of the fact that the V-8 gassers were known as fire traps, it would be interesting to know the % of gas vs. diesels in the early years vs. just a few years later. I'm sure when 8/915s first came out, there were still a fair amount of gas-powered combines as a whole, whereas just a few years later diesels pretty much took over the market. IIRC, the 915 gas production ended in 1975 model year, 815 gas production ended a year later. If that's the case, a Low-Profile 915 gas would probably be a rare machine overall. Between the fire issues and the Arab Oil Embargo, I'm guessing gas-engined 8/915s all but disappeared when the Low-profile models came out in 1974. Sad thing is, I'm sure most other manufacturers were in the same boat. When the Deere 66/7700s first came out, a fair % of them were gas-powered as well. By the mid-1970s, they had pretty much phased out gas engines as well. 

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51 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Am I reading this wrong or is it a misprint? The combine gets LIGHTER with a full tank of grain?

Just the color of the fonts were messed up.  Still gets the point across because until I saw this I always thought the up front engine combines were heavier on the right side

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52 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Am I reading this wrong or is it a misprint? The combine gets LIGHTER with a full tank of grain?

Just the color of the fonts were messed up.  Still gets the point across because until I saw this I always thought the up front engine combines were heavier on the right side

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I've seen a few 7-915 around but never really had anything to do with then. But 914's I know inside and out. Was the 914 based on the low profile 915? We got both the older and newer style 914 here and there is a few differences in them 

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12 minutes ago, acem said:

I've never seen a 914 or any other modern pull type combine in person.

This year is the first year we never ran a pull type. Otherwise always had 1 or 2 going. Was lots in use 20+ years ago but still a few going yet

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On 11/11/2023 at 9:06 AM, Big Bud guy said:

What was the deal with all these 15 series gassers burning up.  They didn't know how to properly shield a V8 like Massey did.  

I can think of at least 1 Massey gasser in the neighborhood that caught on fire....

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I know I've seen IH advertising describing the 914PT as a 915SP without the engine, cab, and drivetrain, so yes, I would say the two are similar in design. Although the 914 used a conventional paddle fan instead of the unorthodox setup that the 8/915s used. Most of the PT combines from that era were based on a popular SP model made at the same time....The 402 IH was based on the 403SP, the IH 1482 was based on the 1480SP; Deere was no different in that the 6601 was based on the 6600SP, the 7721 was based on the 7720SP; the Massey 751PT was based on the 750SP. 

The 914PT and the 715SP were so popular that IH kept producing them for a couple years after the Axial-Flows were introduced. The late 914s had the red grain tanks as opposed to the earlier ones that had the white grain tanks. I can remember when a "Red Top" 914 was worth considerably more than a "White Top" 914 just because it was that much newer. Sad thing is, both Axial-Flow replacements for the 914 and 715 were probably not really considered all that successful. The 1482 and the 1420 were introduced at a time when the market for both machines was disappearing fast. The 14/1620 and the 14/1682s as a whole were not big sellers.

As far as gas V-8s and fires are concerned, this brought back memories for me. Back in the late 1970s and entire 1980s, our biggest crop was wheat...which was usually harvested in our hottest months of July and August. At that time, all the trucks for hauling grain were V-8 gas burners....Chevy C65/C70s with 366/427 Big Block V-8s, Ford F-6/700s with 391s/429s, and they were still a lot of IH Loadstars with either 345 or 392 V-8s. If you pulled into a wheat stubble field with one of these outfits with a hot engine with hot exhaust manifolds, you might almost get shot at by somebody. It was pretty much an unwritten rule that you avoided bringing them directly into the field unless you had an area in the corner of the field where the stubble was flattened by traffic in/out of the field, or some guys would keep a disc hooked to a tractor to work the stubble down in a spot in the field to allow trucks to be parked in the field. Seemed like every summer there would be a stubble field on fire due to a truck with a hot engine.

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6 hours ago, SDman said:

I know I've seen IH advertising describing the 914PT as a 915SP without the engine, cab, and drivetrain, so yes, I would say the two are similar in design. Although the 914 used a conventional paddle fan instead of the unorthodox setup that the 8/915s used. Most of the PT combines from that era were based on a popular SP model made at the same time....The 402 IH was based on the 403SP, the IH 1482 was based on the 1480SP; Deere was no different in that the 6601 was based on the 6600SP, the 7721 was based on the 7720SP; the Massey 751PT was based on the 750SP. 

The 914PT and the 715SP were so popular that IH kept producing them for a couple years after the Axial-Flows were introduced. The late 914s had the red grain tanks as opposed to the earlier ones that had the white grain tanks. I can remember when a "Red Top" 914 was worth considerably more than a "White Top" 914 just because it was that much newer. Sad thing is, both Axial-Flow replacements for the 914 and 715 were probably not really considered all that successful. The 1482 and the 1420 were introduced at a time when the market for both machines was disappearing fast. The 14/1620 and the 14/1682s as a whole were not big sellers.

As far as gas V-8s and fires are concerned, this brought back memories for me. Back in the late 1970s and entire 1980s, our biggest crop was wheat...which was usually harvested in our hottest months of July and August. At that time, all the trucks for hauling grain were V-8 gas burners....Chevy C65/C70s with 366/427 Big Block V-8s, Ford F-6/700s with 391s/429s, and they were still a lot of IH Loadstars with either 345 or 392 V-8s. If you pulled into a wheat stubble field with one of these outfits with a hot engine with hot exhaust manifolds, you might almost get shot at by somebody. It was pretty much an unwritten rule that you avoided bringing them directly into the field unless you had an area in the corner of the field where the stubble was flattened by traffic in/out of the field, or some guys would keep a disc hooked to a tractor to work the stubble down in a spot in the field to allow trucks to be parked in the field. Seemed like every summer there would be a stubble field on fire due to a truck with a hot engine.

Or  you took the scoop shovel from the truck and flattened out an area for exhaust system not to touch. 

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They continued building the 915 rice special until the 1460/80 rice combines came out sometime in 79. The grain rotor don't work in rice. The rice rotor was better but the specialty rotor finally got it right. 

They built 1420, 1460 and 1480 rice special combines but not 1440. 1440 combines are rare in Arkansas. There are no 1482 combines or pull types from any brand of that vintage.

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12 hours ago, SDman said:

The 914PT and the 715SP were so popular that IH kept producing them for a couple years after the Axial-Flows were introduced. The late 914s had the red grain tanks as opposed to the earlier ones that had the white grain tanks. I can remember when a "Red Top" 914 was worth considerably more than a "White Top" 914 just because it was that much newer. Sad thing is, both Axial-Flow replacements for the 914 and 715 were probably not really considered all that successful. The 1482 and the 1420 were introduced at a time when the market for both machines was disappearing fast. The 14/1620 and the 14/1682s as a whole were not big sellers.

Is that why the 914 and 715 were made up until like 1979? I assumed it was because IH didn’t have the 1420 and 1482 ready by 1977-78. If the 914 and 715’s were that popular that makes more sense.  

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On 11/11/2023 at 5:44 AM, John Rowehl said:

If the lower profile models fit in under a 12’ door, how high were the earlier ones?

Was there an asking price listed for that 915? Just curious.

We had to remove the mufflers to get under a 14' door to get it in the shop to work on it...

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IH really built a good conventional combine with the late 815/915 combines.  Heck, the late 715's with German diesels were popular around here.  However,  the new rotor prototype machines were being tested when the late 15 series machines were introduced.   With sales decent and the revolution in harvesting on the way, Harvester did not need to spend much money advertising them.  The buyers guides were enough coverage. 

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41 minutes ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

IH really built a good conventional combine with the late 815/915 combines.  Heck, the late 715's with German diesels were popular around here.  However,  the new rotor prototype machines were being tested when the late 15 series machines were introduced.   With sales decent and the revolution in harvesting on the way, Harvester did not need to spend much money advertising them.  The buyers guides were enough coverage. 

The 914 was a very popular combine in this area of ND. Even diehard JD guys would buy a 914. The 96 JD pull type was popular here also but the 6601,7701 weren’t as popular. The 403, 503 combine was also very popular and well regarded. A lot of them were in use up until guys went to used 1480s or new 1688. A local guy ran 3 503s on 2000 acres of durum every year. For a couple years he had his crop custom combined by neighbor with 2188s . Then he bought a new late 2388 with only a pickup head attachment. There were a few 915, 815 in area but most were 715s then 1460s took the area by storm. The 1480s all came later and most of the first ones were used custom machines. When they talk of no rice 1440 it makes sense. The 1440 was a severely lightened 1460. Small planetaries no turbo. The same threshing parts just anyplace to cheapen or lighten machine they did so I don’t think it was heavy enough for the beating a rice combine could take. 

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As I mentioned here the 503 was so well liked up here most guys skipped over the 15 series or they went with the 715. I know there was at least 15 or 20 503s still working fields around 1994 or 5. My buddy has 2 newer JD combines now but he went from 3 503s to  3 JD 9600s .  They still ran one 503 alongside the first 9600 he had.   A lot of the neighbors either retired with 914s or traded them in on mid 80s combines. By time those guys were quitting with the 503s most had bought a few combines to use as spares or part them out to go to the v belt type drive.  
 

  We used to grind valves  a few gas type combines when we had time during harvest. On the 503 we used to pull head off , grind valves and reinstall in 3 hours. Most guys had a bucket of extra valve springs and valves and stuff. We always kept valve seals and stuff on hand and they always had head gaskets around. Even the Chrysler and Ford v8s on other combines would get a head pulled and fixed every now and then.

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There were a few 1440s sold and tried in rice. The engine was too weak to deal with difficult threshing and mud. Add a slug and it was done.

Some added turbos but they still didn't work out for some reason.

The few 1440s were generally sold in areas without much rice like the Arkansas River valley where I am. I've never seen one in rice country. My friend in Dumas has never seen one in southeast Arkansas/Northeast Louisiana and he's seen a lot of combines!

 

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You'll notice only the 1460 and 1480 mentioned in this original axial flow rice combine brochure. When they latter added the 1420 it was available for rice. 

There were a lot of 715 rice combines sold. They did well in mud with big rice and canes. Even better with a mud hog!

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I myself would like to see a D407-powered 815, or a DT407-powered 915.  Never have seen one in person, myself.  And it seems like the sales literature usually pictured a gas engine powered machine.  Later ones that are 400 series engine powered, those you can see pictured in sales literature.

I do happen to have the operators manual for the 407 engines that were in the early 815 & 915 combines.  It was a separate manual from the combine itself.

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20 hours ago, acem said:

I've never seen a 914 or any other modern pull type combine in person.

I took this video at HCOP in 2021. I had never seen one operate until then. 

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14 hours ago, dale560 said:

Or  you took the scoop shovel from the truck and flattened out an area for exhaust system not to touch. 

How tall did you guys all cut the stubble?   Since the Massey 21A days we have always taken the trucks into the field right to the combines.  Only fires I have seen started is when someone drove a pickup or car into the field.  

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