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Loadstar repower


766 Man

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12 hours ago, JaredT said:

Neighbors had an old Loadstar with a 3208 Cat. They ran that thing like it was stolen for at least 20 years

And that is likely a big contributing factor to it's longevity 

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We had a retired fuel truck with a 3208 and a 5/2 for a tanker when i was younger, wasn’t fast, but it always ran, had well over 300k . Have a 77 ford pumper with one and a 541? Allison, that one requires being flogged and it smokes a lot, but it ALWAYS runs, has cost us 1,300 in repairs in the last 25 years and gets hot suppers routinely, often gets stuck pumping sludge because it is the most sacrificial and shows somewhere around 80K on the clock and lord knows how many hours. 
our dump truck has a 250hp turbo version. Gets decent mileage too. 

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8 minutes ago, brahamfireman said:

Found a good 1 for you.

https://m.facebook.com/marketplace/item/823639262760690/?ref=browse_tab

3208 TURBO, 13 speed.

Screenshot_20231106_185032_Chrome.jpg

Screenshot_20231106_185040_Chrome.jpg

If that was closer it might be coming home with me to join my Paystar

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How many bushels do you haul each year?

How many miles to your market?

What's your terrain like? (Flattish, mountains, hills, etc)

Do you work on your own equipment or take it to a shop?

All these questions influence your decisions.

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17 minutes ago, acem said:

How many bushels do you haul each year?

How many miles to your market?

What's your terrain like? (Flattish, mountains, hills, etc)

Do you work on your own equipment or take it to a shop?

All these questions influence your decisions.

  Under 15,000 bushels most years.  7 miles one way but they have gotten quite picky on a number of things but I always deliver quality product.  I hate the fishing for dockage nonetheless.  Flat other than a couple of hills.  Common sense has to be used when using tractor and wagons.  Wet roads are a no go because of the hills.  I can work on things but my night vision has gotten poor.  I can't have bottlenecks at harvest time and that includes shipping.  I can store if under 13 percent.  This year I have had a fair amount of soybeans come off at above 14 percent moisture.  Crops were almost a month late coming up this spring due to lack of moisture so that pushed harvest back the same amount of time.  Stuff needs to come off regardless of moisture due to the season getting late.  Not as bad as Chris' situation but there could be a few inches of snow here to stay in a couple of weeks.  I don't have aeration in the bin so I don't like to gamble on storing much of anything.  I sleep better when I have full control over a process versus depending on others.  

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Dad always ran the Cat 3160 in our Massey 1800 wide @$$ open and pulled the crap out of it but never lost the engine in the 8 years we had it.  My opinion only too many guys didn't run them full throttle because they thought the fast RPMs was "bad" for them when just the opposite was true.  Same could be said for the Cummins 470/504/555.

I mean no disrespect to any one on here but we ditched gas trucks in 1991.  At that time we had a semi to haul to the elevator but still used the 65' Loadstar and 69' Louisville Ford to haul off the combine to the bins.  We went to a pair of Ford diesels one with the Cummins 5.9 and the other Ford 7.8.  If I had to go back to using gas trucks for serious work on the farm again I would quit farming.  Don't miss all the fiddle F'ing around keeping them going, guzzling gas, and no power like a diesel.  I know I showed off the Loastar bought earlier this year but I all used it for was to shuttle cleaned wheat from the cleaner to the bin and the drill a few times and even then it gave me fits.  Gimmie the worst perceived diesel engines out whether it be small block Cats or screaming jimmies and I'll take just one over a fleet of gas trucks.  

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That's a very short haul but several bushels (15,000).

In a semi that would be 19 loads of 800 bushels.

In a 10 wheeler that would be 30 loads of 500 bushels.

In a single axle trucks you would take 50 loads of 300 bushels each.

I if you are driving the truck you probably only want to make one trip per day. If you have a driver you could make multiple daily trips.

In my situation I store my rice (and dry it down) then hire it shipped to rice mills (couple hundred miles away). My soybeans I haul to the closest barge terminal 50 miles away (one way). I don't grow many soybeans so I only make 1-4 trips each year. I would prefer a 10 wheeler my wife could drive while I concentrate on combining but it hasn't worked out yet. I sometimes grow other grains, etc. the semi takes a lot of tires and batteries to maintain for no more than I use it but the 350 Cummins is nice.

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9 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

Dad always ran the Cat 3160 in our Massey 1800 wide @$$ open and pulled the crap out of it but never lost the engine in the 8 years we had it.  My opinion only too many guys didn't run them full throttle because they thought the fast RPMs was "bad" for them when just the opposite was true.  Same could be said for the Cummins 470/504/555.

I mean no disrespect to any one on here but we ditched gas trucks in 1991.  At that time we had a semi to haul to the elevator but still used the 65' Loadstar and 69' Louisville Ford to haul off the combine to the bins.  We went to a pair of Ford diesels one with the Cummins 5.9 and the other Ford 7.8.  If I had to go back to using gas trucks for serious work on the farm again I would quit farming.  Don't miss all the fiddle F'ing around keeping them going, guzzling gas, and no power like a diesel.  I know I showed off the Loastar bought earlier this year but I all used it for was to shuttle cleaned wheat from the cleaner to the bin and the drill a few times and even then it gave me fits.  Gimmie the worst perceived diesel engines out whether it be small block Cats or screaming jimmies and I'll take just one over a fleet of gas trucks.  

I expect you haul quite a few bushels a significant distance since you farm in Montana. I would want a diesel semi in good condition to haul much grain long distance.

If I had a better hopper bottom trailer I might haul my rice to the mill. However it's hard to justify $15,000 for a good trailer when I can get my rice hauled for a few thousand dollars a year (and don't have to worry about being broken down hours from home).

However hauling grain seven miles is not far. Even in a gas truck he won't burn that much gas. It'll barely be warmed up enough for the heater to work when he gets there!

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4 minutes ago, acem said:

I expect you haul quite a few bushels a significant distance since you farm in Montana. I would want a diesel semi in good condition to haul much grain long distance.

If I had a better hopper bottom trailer I might haul my rice to the mill. However it's hard to justify $15,000 for a good trailer when I can get my rice hauled for a few thousand dollars a year (and don't have to worry about being broken down hours from home).

However hauling grain seven miles is not far. Even in a gas truck he won't burn that much gas. It'll barely be warmed up enough for the heater to work when he gets there!

We already a semi for hauling to town when we bought the two Ford diesels.  At that time the furthest we hauled from the combine to the bin was around 3-4 miles.  Trying to climb out of a coulee, wheat running over all 4 sides of the box, pedal mashed to the floor in granny gear barely getting out.  I don't miss those days.  Our diesel trucks would go at least 2 days on a fill.  The gassers needed fuel every day.  I only have one neighbor left that still uses a pair of C60s for harvest.  He only has 500 acres to cut every year.  

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56 minutes ago, 766 Man said:

  Under 15,000 bushels most years.  7 miles one way but they have gotten quite picky on a number of things but I always deliver quality product.  I hate the fishing for dockage nonetheless.  Flat other than a couple of hills.  Common sense has to be used when using tractor and wagons.  Wet roads are a no go because of the hills.  I can work on things but my night vision has gotten poor.  I can't have bottlenecks at harvest time and that includes shipping.  I can store if under 13 percent.  This year I have had a fair amount of soybeans come off at above 14 percent moisture.  Crops were almost a month late coming up this spring due to lack of moisture so that pushed harvest back the same amount of time.  Stuff needs to come off regardless of moisture due to the season getting late.  Not as bad as Chris' situation but there could be a few inches of snow here to stay in a couple of weeks.  I don't have aeration in the bin so I don't like to gamble on storing much of anything.  I sleep better when I have full control over a process versus depending on others.  

In my area a smaller guy with no truck is up the creek anymore. It has forced guys out of the business if they can’t justify storage or their own truck. The closest haul here is 30 mi one way. Custom trucking during harvest is impossible to find. In the off season it’s no problem at all. There is just no way to farm in my area anymore without your own storage. The elevators aren’t hardly open on the weekends, they shut down early and they don’t care if the weather is great or terrible. Grain bags have been great to our operation. I have a 1980 F-600 with a 370 and 4+2, I could haul 15,000 bu with it no problem. I don’t have any idea what that truck is worth if I was trying to buy it. It would probably sell for more than I would give for it. I’ll never sell it though. I can still remember my grandpa hauling with it when there were still lots of them on the road. If it was only seven miles, I could get 450 bu on it. It won’t have any power, but it would get it there. 

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Fwiw....  $0

My experiece with old gas and juice brakes are...just keep eye out for S series with air.  My 80 S series with a 466/5+2 has wet brakes.  Lost back wheel cylinders 4 5 years ago.  After literally months seeking a solution (even help here) we could not find the correct kits or shoes even.  For a 1980!  That is a common truck.  We thankfully seen a CL ad for a box truck junker in the hills here.  Bought a entire 1992 axle from a wreak IH.  New ubolts etc.  And for apx $1000 we had a 30 year old axle on my 4000 dollar (rust cab but low low miles) 14' flatbed. After 16 months.  Stupid.  Should of sold it at auction and bought a decect used deck over for the pickup.

Well never get a wet brake truck again....period.

This kinda what your thinking?  Or tandem.  Just seen this near Idaho.

https://spokane.craigslist.org/hvo/d/colville-detroit-60-volvo-semi-low-low/7683172491.html

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On 11/6/2023 at 2:20 AM, vtfireman85 said:

If you fund me a DT466 with an equivalent of 10k miles, i will give you a 444E 

10K miles on ANYTHING here is a $40K premium. 70Km engines (Rip out) are ask $ more than whole road read truck.

30 years ago would just call the warehouse (with good parts) and build it. 8 hr trip and seller/s will not give details.

I have to bend backwards to sell/deliver <$200 item.

If found 466 would stay here,from info, near any 7.3 ,can be fitted..plenty full but $$$$ .most are > 200k m...so....

both are available re man drop in,from several places ,but will not price with out vin and #id.

been watching some 4xxx

Today <$10K  150-225K miles

same age-'08/worse condition/mileage big 3, 350-5500 = $25-55K

95-96-98 4700 466  5-6 spd

2000-00-01 466-444 444  5-7 spd

autos are cheaper but miles too low, to even be X dog moving vans

WHats the good/bad?  tire/wheel size... brakes  etc  C T A, frame length...

 

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7 hours ago, mmi said:

10K miles on ANYTHING here is a $40K premium. 70Km engines (Rip out) are ask $ more than whole road read truck.

30 years ago would just call the warehouse (with good parts) and build it. 8 hr trip and seller/s will not give details.

I have to bend backwards to sell/deliver <$200 item.

If found 466 would stay here,from info, near any 7.3 ,can be fitted..plenty full but $$$$ .most are > 200k m...so....

both are available re man drop in,from several places ,but will not price with out vin and #id.

been watching some 4xxx

Today <$10K  150-225K miles

same age-'08/worse condition/mileage big 3, 350-5500 = $25-55K

95-96-98 4700 466  5-6 spd

2000-00-01 466-444 444  5-7 spd

autos are cheaper but miles too low, to even be X dog moving vans

WHats the good/bad?  tire/wheel size... brakes  etc  C T A, frame length...

 

Gonna have to take your word for it. 

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I don't mind vacuum/hydraulic brakes on a gas burner because the gasoline engine provides significant braking at road speed. This helps the brakes not work so hard. Diesel engines don't have a throttle body to help braking and need better brakes.

Anybody remember the stickers that said 'caution air brakes'?

I haven't found air brakes to be less prone to problems. It seems I have to fix air leaks all the time, pods go bad, brake shoes are always stuck to the drums after sitting for 9 months unused.

However Air brakes tend to fail to stoping. Hydraulic brakes fail to not stoping. 

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50 minutes ago, Gearclash said:

This is very true, although many don’t realize that.  Works even better when the ignition is switched off . . . 

Then turn it back on still under load and blow the muffler clean off!!

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27 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

Then turn it back on still under load and blow the muffler clean off!!

We had a Maxum pumper with a massive I-6 that would do that about every 3rd time it went out. Eventually we just did away with the muffler, solved the issue but whew what a racket. 

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5 hours ago, acem said:

I don't mind vacuum/hydraulic brakes on a gas burner because the gasoline engine provides significant braking at road speed. This helps the brakes not work so hard. Diesel engines don't have a throttle body to help braking and need better brakes.

 

Over the decades I guess I have replaced most of the hydraulic brake parts on my 71 Loadstar. Only one I have not been able to find anywhere is a new or good used front brake drum. #108109C1. With 14.090 inside diameter. 

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