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Tractor of the week. Week 44: 806


nepoweshiekfarmalls

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7 hours ago, Tonyinca said:


my 806 LP , I call my cal-Tex cotton girl 

and 806 D single wheel front . Four row hydraulic bean cutter

this unit has cut upwards of 17000 acres in its career

tony 

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Love that single front tire!

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3 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

 

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This is my favorite.  Interesting that it has dual hubs along with eyes for rim mount duals.

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Dad bought his first 806 in 1987. I bought it from him in 2000, and it’s my main tractor today. Since then he’s had a bit of an obsession with 806s… we actually joined this forum when we needed a transfer case for his Elwood equipped 806. He currently has a 2806, I-806, lp 806, the Elwood equipped, his second 806 that was the first to have an M&W turbo (the mfd tractor has one also, and I added it to mine) a narrow front 806. Those are the ones I can think of, he might have more… he and I have probably owned at least 20 in the last 20 years.

 I took mine to a semi-local pull this fall, trying to get my boys interested in pulling to help me convince my wife to build a puller…. They made a decent pit crew!!

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IMG_6444.jpegNo ta, no 3-pt or fast hitch, no pto, no hydraulics! Best we can figure it would have been on a sheepsfoot packer or a ground drive gang mower for perhaps an airport. Dad has been trying to sell the 2806 and the lp because they just aren’t useful to him.

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10 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  There are two types of people.  Those who have kept their 806 D and those who wished that they never got rid of their 806 D.  

Ya, I'm the latter. My 806D was the first diesel on our farm. When I sold it to upgrade to a 986, it had over 11,000 hours and engine had never been opened up. Split tractor once for a clutch and it still had original TA when sold. Still kicking my self for selling it.

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12 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  There are two types of people.  Those who have kept their 806 D and those who wished that they never got rid of their 806 D.  

Wrong. There are three types of people. Type three are those who have never owned an 806D. I am Type 3. 😜

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34 minutes ago, twostepn2001 said:

This 806 LP with a 6 row cotton planter was the very first 806 on the south plains of Texas. My Dad got the second one a few days later.

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This is a 806D pulling a 7 row lister near Hermleigh, Texas in 1966.

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  The bottom 806 looks like the one from the opening credits of the show Dallas.

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17 hours ago, brewcrew said:

IMG_6444.jpegNo ta, no 3-pt or fast hitch, no pto, no hydraulics! Best we can figure it would have been on a sheepsfoot packer or a ground drive gang mower for perhaps an airport. Dad has been trying to sell the 2806 and the lp because they just aren’t useful to him.

I have a few that are no use to the needs of the farm,but I like them and would not think of letting them go. The 806 LP would look good sitting next to the hand clutch 806D std. That's the collector in me speaking.

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9 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

This 806 LP with a 6 row cotton planter was the very first 806 on the south plains of Texas. My Dad got the second one a few days later.

image.thumb.png.17a421b4fdf3ce28aca7f75228c198a8.png

This is a 806D pulling a 7 row lister near Hermleigh, Texas in 1966.

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Great pics and history. Thanks for posting.

Never heard of 7row equipment. Straddle three and two on each outside I guess. What's the row spacing?

What's up with the double markers?

 

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11 hours ago, Rusty_Farmer said:

I have a few that are no use to the needs of the farm,but I like them and would not think of letting them go. The 806 LP would look good sitting next to the hand clutch 806D std. That's the collector in me speaking.

Our lack of knowledge on LP tractors is part of the challenge as well. They just weren’t a thing in our area, even with the Minnie mo crowd (not that there was many). Personally I think those two are a couple of the most unique pieces of his collection, along with the Elwood. But they are his to do with as he sees fit. If someone is interested I could put them in touch.

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12 hours ago, acem said:

What's up with the double markers?

 

My best guess is one for the front tire and one for the hood ornament.

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Here's the complete opening credits for Dallas. Looks like he's running a front mounted cultivator with markers on unplowed ground but that's probably not right.

Maybe a front mounted lister? @twostepn2001

I still run a set of amco markers like that on a hopper. 

I remember looking for the tractor at the beginning of the show every time I saw it coming on...

 

 

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12 hours ago, acem said:

Never heard of 7row equipment. Straddle three and two on each outside I guess. What's the row spacing?

What's up with the double markers?

The reason behind the 7 row lister was to make the ridges or "hills' between the rows. Then later when planting, they used a a 6 row "buster" planter. back then, the row spacing was on 40 inch centers. Now days, most cotton is planted on 30 in. centers but some are experimenting with 80 in. centers. l'm sure there are other reasons, but the main one l've heard is the savings of irrigation water on 80 in. rows.

like Steve C. said, the reason for double markers was one for the front wheel and one looking down the hood. When listing, my Dad liked to stand up and steer the tractor. Said he could make straight rows that way. And there was some people that used a narrow front tractor to list with so the reason for the center marker furrow.

ln 1959, my dad and another man invented the front mounted lister markers. The reasoning behind that was they could get straighter marker furrows by mounting them on the tractor frame instead of on the lister itself and getting the side draft of being mounted on the lister.  Here are a couple of pics l drew several years ago to show what it looked like.

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Dad got a new 806 in 64 with a IH model 560? 6-16 plow . Two or four years later he traded it for a 856 . Both events before my time but I remember that 856 had GUTS ! 

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I find it exciting how some of the best and most iconic tractors from each of the major companies were in that 90-100hp range in the mid-late 60s. You had the 806/56, 4020, 1850 and MMG900. I'll throw the 190xt in there even though I've mixed reviews on it, at best

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