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Cotton bales burning


acem

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  • acem changed the title to Cotton bales burning
27 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Baled at too high a moisture, internal combustion, or outside source of ignition?

 

 

According to FakeBook, spontaneous combustion due to high moisture. Take that with a grain of salt, of course. Regardless of the cause, it's a shame. That's someone's pay day going up in smoke. 

Mac

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I have a hard time believing this was moisture related. Wouldn’t it be tough to get through either a cotton stripper or whatever you used for harvesting?

As tight as those bales are, maybe. 
I have seen them catch on fire when being hauled, either from a blown tire or something weird. They burn hot and smolder for LONG TIME. 

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I don't know about cotton but have seen hay burned both ways. We had over a hundred round bales lit up by someone years ago and had some others that were hot enough to start smoking. Luckily we caught those in time and got them put out.

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Reason I find it hard to believe that they were put up wet, is cotton is generally moved with air. In my mind, it would not be possible to harvest it wet enough to combust? The Deere method might not involve air though. 

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21 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

Reason I find it hard to believe that they were put up wet, is cotton is generally moved with air. In my mind, it would not be possible to harvest it wet enough to combust? The Deere method might not involve air though. 

It does

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l took this pic about 15 years ago at a gin near Lamesa, Texas. They lost nearly 100 modules before it was all finished. Consensus was that high winds started the fire (friction of the wind blowing against the cotton) and then helped it spread. Took almost two weeks for it to finally be put out.

image.thumb.png.147aa620d8d924cd642f4df83bce50ed.png

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5 minutes ago, twostepn2001 said:

Consensus was that high winds started the fire (friction of the wind blowing against the cotton) and then helped it spread.

Is that seriously a thing? I can't wrap my head around that one, to be honest. I know several years ago there was a big fire near Newport, AR caused by a couple teenaged boys sneaking off to smoke a cigarette between rows of cotton modules. They didn't have sense enough to stomp their butts out, and wound up burning 10 or 12 modules. I'm sure they and their parents are still paying for that one.

Mac

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1 minute ago, MacAR said:

Is that seriously a thing?

My nephew is part owner-manager of the second largest gin in Texas. He told me several years ago that there are two main reasons for module fires. Friction or static electricity from high winds. Or a faulty bearing on a stripper or picker. The cotton may be burning or smoldering but nobody notices it and it gets into a module. And a module can burn internally for several days before anyone notices.

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My first experience with cotton was hauling cotton seed into a dairy at Ault Colorado. About the third load in, they were grinding hay right next to where I was unloading my cotton seed. (For those of you who have never been around it, the stuff I was hauling looks like your cotton balls at home with buggers in it.) Somehow the grinder spit out something hot and things got REALLY EXCITING! I got my truck moved out of the way and the guy running the grinder hollers to grab the loader. 
Cotton went one way, bales a different direction and burning hay went into an empty pit. 
Later he told me that cotton is WAY MORE FLAMMABLE than fuel?

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1 hour ago, twostepn2001 said:

My nephew is part owner-manager of the second largest gin in Texas. He told me several years ago that there are two main reasons for module fires. Friction or static electricity from high winds. Or a faulty bearing on a stripper or picker. The cotton may be burning or smoldering but nobody notices it and it gets into a module. And a module can burn internally for several days before anyone notices.

Thanks for the explanation Guy, I can say I've learned something new today. Around these parts, a friction fire usually implies, much as @Rawleigh99 states, that the mortgage got to rubbing against the insurance policy a bit too vigorously! Mind you,  I'm not insinuating that is the case here. Cotton, as I'm coming to find, is a very different animal; I can sorta see now why all the old men said the boll weevil was the best thing that ever happened to my part of Arkansas!

Mac

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10 hours ago, New Englander said:

Very believable after pulling smoking hay bales out of the barn.

I've seen many a barns on fire. I don't know much at all about cotton, but I believe that is plausible for sure

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