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Kind of neat.


DT Fan

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Went to a small plow day last Sunday, was told not to bring a tractor. That's Ok, knew the man had plenty of iron. Spent most of my time on a Series 3 D-17, took a couple rounds on his CA, and ended the day on the 185 with what I believe to be a model 84 pull type.

The neat part of this day was the small suit-case weights, 25 pounders, I spotted in on of his piles. Told me I could have them, no charge! These will be awesome for the pulling tractor(s?). This is the same gentleman I've been getting Farmall wheel weights from.

A few pictures.

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I wonder how that castering tail wheel trails down the road on the 4 bottom trailer plow.  I would think it would really shimmy...of course those AC's go so slow in road gear it's probably not an issue as long as you are pulling it with an AC.😄

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8 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

Wow! A real slat-bottom plow! How did it work? They were for gumbo, right?

Doc., they work great. I really liked that pull plow. About 99% of the plowing I've done has been with a mounted or semi-mounted plow. It was a little different. My plow I use the most has those same bottoms on it. Does it work better or even any different that a regular moldboard? I don't know.

 

3 hours ago, IH Forever said:

I wonder how that castering tail wheel trails down the road on the 4 bottom trailer plow.  I would think it would really shimmy...of course those AC's go so slow in road gear it's probably not an issue as long as you are pulling it with an AC.😄

My 185 will run 18.5 MPH, by GPS, not sure if Mike's would keep up as it has smaller rubber.

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8 hours ago, Mr. Plow said:

Only reference I can find.....

Screenshot_20231027-215534_Chrome.jpg

I saw them suggested somewhere as being sold in a lot of Gravely items. Haven’t found anything else that suggests that either. 
I have seen similar weights hanging on the front of zero turn mowers. 

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22 hours ago, DT Fan said:

Went to a small plow day last Sunday, was told not to bring a tractor. That's Ok, knew the man had plenty of iron. Spent most of my time on a Series 3 D-17, took a couple rounds on his CA, and ended the day on the 185 with what I believe to be a model 84 pull type.

The neat part of this day was the small suit-case weights, 25 pounders, I spotted in on of his piles. Told me I could have them, no charge! These will be awesome for the pulling tractor(s?). This is the same gentleman I've been getting Farmall wheel weights from.

A few pictures.

IMG_2609.jpeg

IMG_2608.jpeg

IMG_2607.jpeg

IMG_2606.jpeg

IMG_2603.jpeg

IMG_2602.jpeg

IMG_2600.jpeg

What is the big wrench laying on the pile of weights? I know I’ve seen it before, is it for an IH combine? 

I don’t remember it but my Grandpa bought a new WD45 and had a 3 bottom snap coupler plow with slat bottoms. My Dad talks about plowing with it when he was young. My maternal Grandpa had a D19 gas and a 4 bottom snap coupler plow. He didn’t like the tractor, always said he wished he’d bought a diesel. I barely remember that combination as he retired and sold his machinery at auction when I was quite young.

I have a couple plows with Plow Chief slat bottoms. They are both restored now but it took some time to find replacement slats for those that were worn, NLA obviously.

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4 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

What is the big wrench laying on the pile of weights? I know I’ve seen it before, is it for an IH combine? 

I don’t remember it but my Grandpa bought a new WD45 and had a 3 bottom snap coupler plow with slat bottoms. My Dad talks about plowing with it when he was young. My maternal Grandpa had a D19 gas and a 4 bottom snap coupler plow. He didn’t like the tractor, always said he wished he’d bought a diesel. I barely remember that combination as he retired and sold his machinery at auction when I was quite young.

I have a couple plows with Plow Chief slat bottoms. They are both restored now but it took some time to find replacement slats for those that were worn, NLA obviously.

That is indeed a wrench off the 1460. Apparently I forgot to hang it back on the machine after getting done with a little crisis maintenance! Combine needs to come back out of the shed for a little more cleaning before getting put away for the year, will hang it back on then.

My uncle has a Fast Hitch 3-14 slat bottom. Plowed with it one day couple years ago. One of the middle slats got away and somehow I found it before it got plowed under! We finished the field but it didn't work very well!

The man who put on this plow day used two of his D-19's before getting the 185 out. I believe the first was the diesel he just acquired, turns out the power director is weak iin that one. Then he got the gas one out for awhile. His propane model stayed in the shed. So many choices for so little ground.

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We are in southern Indiana, on sticky clay ground. We had slats on the 240, then 504. When we bought the 656, dealer said he could not get slat plows so we gave in and switched. When we bought the 240, dad had a 2 bottom pull type with solid moldboards so dad said he would use it. Dealer brought the slat plow out with the tractor. It pulled so much easier so we bought it as well. 

Slat plows were not as good in rocky soil. A good size rock would remove a slat or two easily.

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22 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

Wow! A real slat-bottom plow! How did it work? They were for gumbo, right?

Since I went to a plowing match , I got this (printed in 1920s)  read it and I always wondered about the slatted plows . 
thought maybe it was right to show their reasoning. 
I also am reworking my Allis Chalmers model 4 2-12. So the subject of Allis Chalmers is fresh in my head. 
credits to The Oliver Plow Book : a treatise on plows and plowing 

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22 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

Wow! A real slat-bottom plow! How did it work? They were for gumbo, right?

....you dont have them?   Here the potato guys just about all have Lemken 6 btm roll-over slat plows nowdays. We have quite rocky soil in my neigborhood an then some more peat-y soils too.  But they dont like peat since worried a wet fall will ruin the harvest.  Pull smoother guy told me... so less fuel.  I figured they were everywhere 

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11 hours ago, acem said:

Never seen a slat bottom plow.

I have seen the slat bottom plow before but I always thought of them as a breaking plow.

Used on native sod.

Who is right, beats me?

 

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The story's/theories I've heard is they were promoted for sticky soil types and supposed to pull easier. I would say they do work well in sticky situations. Do they pull easier? I've discussed this with a number of people. My thinking is that it would be hard to prove one way or the other with just 'seat of the pants' reference. For an accurate comparison you would need two plows in new shape and go to the field with equipment to measure fuel consumption and power requirements.

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Read where in Texas soil is so hard to scour they used hog skins on the moldboards. Thought northeast Ohio is bad ! 
Heard of Glass moldboards ,yep in the Oliver book 

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One of the guys in our local antique power club has a semi-mount two bottom case plow with poly moldboards, they work great! I believe you can get them for most brands of plows. He made his 2 bottom out of a 4 or 5, don't remember. Pulls it with a Case 300.

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16 hours ago, acem said:

Never seen a slat bottom plow.

I have a 3-14 bottom slat plow a little genius. 

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10 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

I have seen the slat bottom plow before but I always thought of them as a breaking plow.

Used on native sod.

Who is right, beats me?

 

I’ve never thought of them as only for native soil. More for wet ground that doesn’t scour as well. Since there is less surface are there is more pressure on the slats causing them to scour more easily. 

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