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The good and bad of a IH 620 grain drill


Reichow7120

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Not to far from me is a IH 620 grain drill for sale. 15 ft with grass seeder. Haven't laid eyes on it yet. But wondering the pros and cons of it. What to look for on it, etc. How it compares to a 5100 or JD 8300.

Would be ran on roughly 40 to 60 acres of wheat a year. 10 acres of oats every year or so, and alfalfa periodically.

Yeah, I know its not a no till drill. But not running one now anyway ( JD 8300 18 hole). Just trying to find something cheap to cover ground a bit faster. And so far i haven't found anything close, cheap in Tandem hitch form 

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7 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

Not to far from me is a IH 620 grain drill for sale. 15 ft with grass seeder. Haven't laid eyes on it yet. But wondering the pros and cons of it. What to look for on it, etc. How it compares to a 5100 or JD 8300.

Would be ran on roughly 40 to 60 acres of wheat a year. 10 acres of oats every year or so, and alfalfa periodically.

Yeah, I know its not a no till drill. But not running one now anyway ( JD 8300 18 hole). Just trying to find something cheap to cover ground a bit faster. And so far i haven't found anything close, cheap in Tandem hitch form 

Good drills and they seed well. The packer used a  greasable bushing set up that worked well for years. The later drills went to a bearing setup. The discs need replacing if they were so the scrapers stay in place. The only really downfall they have and this isn’t much of a problem is the dual front wheels if on real tight ground or real loose ground cause two runs of emergence slower. Normal farming this doesn’t bother. Seeded many thousand acres of crop with 620 , 6200 then 7200 hoe. We used a 6200 to seed 100 acres this year was very happy with crop. They came in 6,7,8 10, 12 and 14 foot never heard of 15 foot. We had 100 drills 3 sevens hooked together then dad went to 2 14 Foot 620 and 2 seven foot hooked together. Here is picture of wheat seeded this year with a worn out 6200

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Back in the later 1970s-1980s, IH 620(and the later 6200) press drills were the gold standard around here...even most diehard John Deere guys had IH drills back then. Keep some disc opener bearings on hand. Make sure the hub/wheel bearings are in good shape...the original setup had the two wheels/hubs locked together, later they came out with a redesigned setup that allowed the wheels to turn independently. Check the seed tube hoses for cracks/breaks. 

Back in the 1980s, those drills probably seeded the entire states of North & South Dakota almost every year. Very common setup was either 2-14's or 3-14's hitched together with factory endwise transport. 

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lets see ... 12' 20 runs (7.5 in) needed: 40 new blade and bearing,new scraper (rotary from shoup),previous owner left lock pin in(major frame bend),check for high speed sprocket(if needed),had to weld a new square tube in all the press wheel,put greassable ball bearing to replace extremely worn cast bushing and a lot of little parts later (chain,pin,spring...)work like it should and no regret.

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39 minutes ago, acem said:

I don't think I've ever seen one in person but I have seen them in the annual buyers guides. Down here the end wheel drills (10, 510, 5100) were used.

What's the difference?

I never understood how they picked up.

acem, they had a hydraulic cylinder right above the front tandem wheels that raised/lowered the entire rank of openers. There was also a drive clutch that engaged/disengaged along with the raising/lowering of the rank of openers.

Back in that time, many guys around here had not one, but two sets of box drills for planting wheat. 1) Hoe/shovel drills for planting winter wheat. These drills were usually in 10" or 12" row spacing. They left the topsoil in rough ridges so the soil wouldn't blow in the wintertime if there was no snow cover. 2) Press drills were used for planting spring wheat. They were usually in 6", 7", or 8" row spacing. They left the ground much flatter and usually guys would plant a little higher seed rate for spring wheat.

Used to run a set of 3-14' 620 press drills for the neighbor back in the mid-1980s....pulled them with an IH3588 2+2. He also had a set of IH 150 hoe drills, 2-14's for winter wheat.

620 press drill.png

620 endwise transport.png

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I don't see any other way but rolling it around on the packer wheels. Except maybe side-loading it on a low trailer if you needed to go very far.

Keep in mind this drill is >40 years old. As great as everyone is saying they are, none of that matters if it's slap wore out. It'll cost more than the drill is worth, and more than you can buy a usable drill for, to replace things like opener discs, seed tubes, etc.. If the pack wheels are worn through, well...

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We have quite a few drills and we are going to determine what works for our new crop rotations. I've never seen a 620/6200 in person and the newest IH version we have is a Case IH 5200 drill. I think nobody makes a new conventional drill anymore (?) so if you want one it's buy something used, reconditioning what needs to be to keep it in good shape . If double disk they have all worked good for us , our single disk model 10 white drill we sold to a neighbor 15 years ago after going to no till although since then we have gotten away with double disk in some no till situations 

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The packer wheels never move on a 620...they also function as transport wheels with the tandem set of tires up front. Pull one of them down a gravel road...those packer wheels make soooo much noise it'll drive you nuts...especially if they are the solid steel packer wheels. The 620s had different options for packer wheels as well. You could have a full steel wheel, or what they called a combination wheel that had a steel center and a rubber outside that acted like a tire....both setups were common in my area.

As far as transport of these drills....in my area the most common way to transport those drills was to use what everyone called a Donahue implement trailer. They were made in various lengths, but a 30' was most common here. You pulled the Donahue trailer in front of the drill set(most common around here at that time was either a 2-14' set or maybe 2 or 3 10' drill set); dropped the wheels on the Donahue trailer, pulled the drill set onto the Donahue trailer, then backed the trailer back up into the wheel carrier frame to use the wheels to raise the trailer off the ground, and then transport the drills to the next field. At the time, that was a pretty slick setup for transporting wide farm equipment with a minimum of hassle. 

http://www.donahuetrailers.com/

That factory endwise transport setup on the IH drills was not without its own set of problems. The front caster wheels were part of the factory endwise transport. They were OK if the setup was pulled by a tractor at speeds of 15mph or so, but if someone decided to pull that setup with a pickup or small truck at faster speeds....those tires and wheel bearings would get hot in a hurry. Nothing worse than working on a set of drills along the side of a busy highway. BTDT

I'd be curious to know just how many IH 620 drill sets my old IH dealer sold new back in the day. I'm guessing 2 to 3 dozen over the years. Common as water when I was a kid.

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20 minutes ago, SDman said:

The packer wheels never move on a 620...they also function as transport wheels with the tandem set of tires up front. Pull one of them down a gravel road...those packer wheels make soooo much noise it'll drive you nuts...especially if they are the solid steel packer wheels. The 620s had different options for packer wheels as well. You could have a full steel wheel, or what they called a combination wheel that had a steel center and a rubber outside that acted like a tire....both setups were common in my area.

As far as transport of these drills....in my area the most common way to transport those drills was to use what everyone called a Donahue implement trailer. They were made in various lengths, but a 30' was most common here. You pulled the Donahue trailer in front of the drill set(most common around here at that time was either a 2-14' set or maybe 2 or 3 10' drill set); dropped the wheels on the Donahue trailer, pulled the drill set onto the Donahue trailer, then backed the trailer back up into the wheel carrier frame to use the wheels to raise the trailer off the ground, and then transport the drills to the next field. At the time, that was a pretty slick setup for transporting wide farm equipment with a minimum of hassle. 

http://www.donahuetrailers.com/

That factory endwise transport setup on the IH drills was not without its own set of problems. The front caster wheels were part of the factory endwise transport. They were OK if the setup was pulled by a tractor at speeds of 15mph or so, but if someone decided to pull that setup with a pickup or small truck at faster speeds....those tires and wheel bearings would get hot in a hurry. Nothing worse than working on a set of drills along the side of a busy highway. BTDT

I'd be curious to know just how many IH 620 drill sets my old IH dealer sold new back in the day. I'm guessing 2 to 3 dozen over the years. Common as water when I was a kid.

Yes our dealer always had various sizes of new drills setting on the lot. We had a set of transports that let you pull the drills in seeding position. . On dads 28 ft set they had spoked wheels. You shoved a 2 inch by 14 ft pipe through the spokes then two 8 ft mini I beams with a hook on front got slipped underneath. The hook latched over front drill frame about 3 feet on eith side of caster wheels. Then a 2 wheel axle setup that had slide together piping for with was placed on back side of I beam that had special hook and loop. You took a crowbar and rolled axle around and pinned it on bottom. As you rolled axle it lifted packers. A hi lift jack was helpful to lift drills. This sounds complicated but it was actually a 10 minute job to put 2 drills in transport. Most of the time though we just pulled drills down the road slowly if moving them. Never knew they made 16 ft drill as your literature states never seen one.

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1 hour ago, bitty said:

We have quite a few drills and we are going to determine what works for our new crop rotations. I've never seen a 620/6200 in person and the newest IH version we have is a Case IH 5200 drill. I think nobody makes a new conventional drill anymore (?) so if you want one it's buy something used, reconditioning what needs to be to keep it in good shape . If double disk they have all worked good for us , our single disk model 10 white drill we sold to a neighbor 15 years ago after going to no till although since then we have gotten away with double disk in some no till situations 

Great plains still makes end wheel drills and maybe JD. There are several new great plain end wheel drills on cattle farms round here.

image.png.a97084936016e1efbdffc60a07ce5a79.png

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23 minutes ago, bitty said:

We have quite a few drills and we are going to determine what works for our new crop rotations. I've never seen a 620/6200 in person and the newest IH version we have is a Case IH 5200 drill. I think nobody makes a new conventional drill anymore (?) so if you want one it's buy something used, reconditioning what needs to be to keep it in good shape . If double disk they have all worked good for us , our single disk model 10 white drill we sold to a neighbor 15 years ago after going to no till although since then we have gotten away with double disk in some no till situations 

Sunflower, Great Plains and Landoll still make conventionals. Anyone else. I don't know 

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1 hour ago, SDman said:

The packer wheels never move on a 620...they also function as transport wheels with the tandem set of tires up front. Pull one of them down a gravel road...those packer wheels make soooo much noise it'll drive you nuts..

So, not worth a damn for transporting long distances on paved roads full of potholes? It might be at times going 6 miles down the road some place and for good or for bad most the roads are paved ( what condition they might be in is a different matter)

 

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3 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

So, not worth a damn for transporting long distances on paved roads full of potholes? It might be at times going 6 miles down the road some place and for good or for bad most the roads are paved ( what condition they might be in is a different matter)

 

It’s hard on the wheels but we routinely moved them 3 to 10 mph down paved and gravel. We always kept speed down to under 10 mph though.

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18 minutes ago, acem said:

They should have wheels on the back like a JD 750 no till drill.

I have no pictures but my father-in-law actually did that to his 620 drill except he made it so that it was a rockshaft design.

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1972 Summer/Fall Buyers Guide 

1DC77357-968B-4396-9367-0AC64B19A7FC.thumb.jpeg.56d60f008f910037c4834878f50f0ba1.jpeg

There were lots of 150 hoe drills sold here back in the day. Great grandpa had a couple different sets. Bought one in August 1975. Tandem set as 24 ft iirc. 

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42 minutes ago, IHhogfarmer said:

1972 Summer/Fall Buyers Guide 

1DC77357-968B-4396-9367-0AC64B19A7FC.thumb.jpeg.56d60f008f910037c4834878f50f0ba1.jpeg

There were lots of 150 hoe drills sold here back in the day. Great grandpa had a couple different sets. Bought one in August 1975. Tandem set as 24 ft iirc. 

perfect shot of working parts of drill. the early 620s had the cast boots for disc mounting. this carried over from the 100 and earlier series. the later or mid models had a steel arm that was part of attachment point. the early cast boots would break in rocky ground. we never had rubber tire packers. either solid steel or spoked.

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On 10/24/2023 at 8:16 PM, SDman said:

Back in the later 1970s-1980s, IH 620(and the later 6200) press drills were the gold standard around here...even most diehard John Deere guys had IH drills back then. Keep some disc opener bearings on hand. Make sure the hub/wheel bearings are in good shape...the original setup had the two wheels/hubs locked together, later they came out with a redesigned setup that allowed the wheels to turn independently. Check the seed tube hoses for cracks/breaks. 

Back in the 1980s, those drills probably seeded the entire states of North & South Dakota almost every year. Very common setup was either 2-14's or 3-14's hitched together with factory endwise transport. 

No B.S. here!

Those drills were everywhere.

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On 10/25/2023 at 9:35 AM, Reichow7120 said:

So, not worth a damn for transporting long distances on paved roads full of potholes? It might be at times going 6 miles down the road some place and for good or for bad most the roads are paved ( what condition they might be in is a different matter)

 

I have to admit this transport setup on Michigan roads is giving me a bit of pause on the drill.

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