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Why was IH construction eq unpopular ?


tommyw-5088

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4 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

They closed a Deere ag dealer here a few years ago. They told him to sell it and he wouldn’t. I don’t know how he thought he was going to win, but they finally canceled his contract. I don’t know if it happens with other colors, probably, but green is the only one I have seen tell a dealer to sell out or we’ll close the store and actually follow through. That said, he wasn’t selling a lot of new equipment. The Case IH I deal with is a single location store. 

  Back during the mid-1970's JI Case cancelled or refused renewal to several dealers here.  At that point JD did not close even one of their dealers in the same area.  The cancelled Case dealers for the most part went out and got White, MF, or Ford franchises but before they had time to rebuild their customer base the 1980's were here and they fell short of that goal.  A couple had spent money on upgrading facilities before Case sent them the nasty-grams.  

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23 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Out of curiosity did anything besides the dozers survive the Dresser purchase in ~1983? I don't recall seeing anything else IH branded "Dresser" except for dozers.

My understanding was Dresser dropped everything but the dozers like so many hot potatoes the moment the ink dried on the contract.

Dresser kept the dozer/track loader/pipelayer line(TD-7/100 through TD-25) going, Payloaders(510 through 580), only the smallest of the scrapers(412B), and hydraulic excavators(Bought from Yumbo at first, then rebadged Komatsu after 1988).

Dresser's focus was mining so a lot of the small stuff was dropped. But they supported(loosely, lol) the rest of the former IH Payline.

Dresser bought Galion Iron Works in the mid 70s so Dresser already had the Galion graders, rollers, and cranes, etc in their portfolio. Most Galion graders were powered by IH engines.

I speculate another reason for Dresser discontinuing the small IH stuff(Backhoes, Industrial Wheel Tractors, Forklifts, etc) was that these smaller machines were based off of IH AG tractor designs. This would be complicated to manufacture products relying on another company to provide support and components. Later this would come to light as with the IH AG division sale to Tennaco split Dresser's engine sources in half. IH 300 and 400 series diesels staying with Navistar, and smaller Neuss diesels going to Case IH. So after the Case IH merger Dresser started using Cummins engines. Even selling retrofit kits for putting Cummins in older Payline machines.

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7 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I often wonder how long the single store will be around. It’s a very good dealer. There was another single store Case IH/New Holland dealer, but recently sold after the owner committed suicide. I have wondered if the dealership was a contributing factor in his death, but I did not know him personally. I imagine in todays environment, owning a single store is not for the faint hearted. 

Honestly, if I was to start a Ag dealer today, I might go with Agco just because the way JD and CNH handle their business now plus it would be something different.  Selling the Challenger/Fendts two tracks would appeal to me.  

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4 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

Honestly, if I was to start a Ag dealer today, I might go with Agco just because the way JD and CNH handle their business now plus it would be something different.  Selling the Challenger/Fendts two tracks would appeal to me.  

  AGCO dealers here are a part of an ownership group consisting of one store dealers.  Several locations under one name/ one identity.  A couple of big name AGCO dealers joined forces in SE PA.  There is a one owner one location JD dealer to the east of me.  There is a lot of highly profitable agriculture around him to provide a base.  In the same area there is a one owner one location NH dealer with a similar story to tell.  When I think back to the nearest JD dealer to us during the 1960's the biggest unspoken factor as to them closing in 1965 was the territory was rather Spartan.  The most profitable JD dealers around had vegetable farms who often had big years and a need to spend money.  This all boils down to you need a very fertile sales territory to even think about being a maverick farm equipment dealer today.  

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20 minutes ago, F-301066460puller said:

AGCO is no daisy to deal with from what I remember on the parts side.

I haven’t heard that CNH is any better.  From what I’ve heard if it wasn’t for bigtractorparts it would almost be impossible to keep a pre STX Steiger going.

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4 hours ago, Farming Enthusiast said:

I understand that the Dresser TD25G had a Cummins engine. How did that perform compared to the IH817 in the C?

Don't know, too new for me, always thought the 817 was good power for that size

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16 hours ago, Farming Enthusiast said:

The biggest advantages between the TD25 over the D8s for what we used them for was the 2-speed and the TD25 was much faster up and down the field as well as pulled faster with a load. The two speed was also much nicer for making corners under load and in wet conditions. You could feather the D8 steering in the handles some but it wasn't near as good. The company I worked for acquired a D9 with a tile plow attached when they bought out another company. We put a winch on it and thought it would make an outstanding "pull crawler" to help pull the tile plows around but with its weight and narrow tracks it didn't suit what we used it for one bit in muddy conditions. We put wider track pads on the TD25 my first winter there. Two guys, a pry bar to hold the nuts and a 1" impact. Lifting them beefed up pads will sure make a man out of you if it doesn't wreck your back. 

Did more pads on the 20's then I care to remember, early days it was a breaker bar, can still feel it in my shoulder when the bar would snap as the bolt started to move. We did eventually get an impact but still had to torque them to 400ftlbs, my right are is an inch longer then my left.  

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27 minutes ago, pede said:

Did more pads on the 20's then I care to remember, early days it was a breaker bar, can still feel it in my shoulder when the bar would snap as the bolt started to move. We did eventually get an impact but still had to torque them to 400ftlbs, my right are is an inch longer then my left.  

Well that makes what we did sound a lot easier then.  Now that I think about it I wanna say the drive on that big impact was 1-1/2". It was a big heavy prehistoric looking thing with a shaft for the drive. 

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1 hour ago, Farming Enthusiast said:

Well that makes what we did sound a lot easier then.  Now that I think about it I wanna say the drive on that big impact was 1-1/2". It was a big heavy prehistoric looking thing with a shaft for the drive. 

 We actually rented an electric 1in drive the first couple of times, thing was heavy, problem was getting the right socket, one that would fit the head (most were somewhat tapered from wear) and squeeze between the bolt head and cleat, had a whole box of "special" sockets. Funny thing is the old manuals calls for a re-torque like every 10hrs.      

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10 minutes ago, pede said:

 We actually rented an electric 1in drive the first couple of times, thing was heavy, problem was getting the right socket, one that would fit the head (most were somewhat tapered from wear) and squeeze between the bolt head and cleat, had a whole box of "special" sockets. Funny thing is the old manuals calls for a re-torque like every 10hrs.      

i changed chains and segments on a  allis 21 cable plow outfit. cut the chain with torch lifted back of crawler with plow and front with the spool rack setup. pulled track out lifted it with loader and just cut the bolts all off with torch. i cut the nuts of hammered cleat out of chain then hammered bolts out of cleats. i painted the entire thing also when done. this was way back ago end may begginning of june of 1997.

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8 hours ago, acem said:

I was 30 in 97.

 

See ace knows what I mean. Driving a 2000 model year car now is older than driving a 57 Chevy when I was a senior in 1988. There was a guy in small town that had a 59 Ford he drove and a few 60 chevy pickups and a lot of 70s dusters and camaros then.

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Exactly I was buying a 7 year old car out of high school, just bought a 25 yr old one Friday over 40 yrs later 🤔 to be fair for almost the exact same price

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