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best place to get a rebuilt carb for a 706?


Mild Bill

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I had a kit put into the old carb on my 706 gasser, and it is leaking/ seeping around the gasket where the bowl and the top are connected.  I am looking at this as not something to leave be.  I don't have any interest in having the old beast catch on fire....

The old tractor had sat and not run for 12 years prior to me working on it to get it running for some yard chores and snowblower work in winter. 

It is snug and I don't think cranking on it will result in anything other than damaging something.

It is a 381419R91 model carb.

Not sure if there is warping someplace or what might be the reason.  Prior to the kit going it it was caked pretty bad with dirt and probably old fuel or oil, so this may have been a problem for a while.

So I am thinking the next best thing to do is go ahead and get a rebuilt carb....

Any suggestions on where is a reputable place to do so, or where to avoid?

I am open to other ideas. 

Thanks again for any wisdom, insight and experience you can share.

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Place to avoid, starts with a "D."

One or both halves of your carb is probably slightly warped from being overtightened in the past. You can tell if you have a piece of plate glass to place the carburetor half on and look under for airspace. Not unfixable. If it's slight enough you could probably lap it out on the glass.

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10 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

These is a guy in NC.  Ernie McCraken is his name on the IH group page on FB.  He post pics of his carb restorations and looks top notch.  I unfortunately dont know his contact or company name

His real name is actually Shane Crock and he resides in Indiana. He has a few Facebook handles including Ernie McCraken. He does do top notch carburetor work.

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On 9/28/2023 at 6:56 PM, Mild Bill said:

I had a kit put into the old carb on my 706 gasser, and it is leaking/ seeping around the gasket where the bowl and the top are connected.  I am looking at this as not something to leave be.  I don't have any interest in having the old beast catch on fire....

The old tractor had sat and not run for 12 years prior to me working on it to get it running for some yard chores and snowblower work in winter. 

It is snug and I don't think cranking on it will result in anything other than damaging something.

It is a 381419R91 model carb.

Not sure if there is warping someplace or what might be the reason.  Prior to the kit going it it was caked pretty bad with dirt and probably old fuel or oil, so this may have been a problem for a while.

So I am thinking the next best thing to do is go ahead and get a rebuilt carb....

Any suggestions on where is a reputable place to do so, or where to avoid?

I am open to other ideas. 

Thanks again for any wisdom, insight and experience you can share.

A rebuilt will be your old carburetor gone through by a rebuilder that does not do the quality of work by someone like Mark's Carburetor Shop.

Send yours in and have it done right!

 

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13 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

A rebuilt will be your old carburetor gone through by a rebuilder that does not do the quality of work by someone like Mark's Carburetor Shop.

Send yours in and have it done right!

 

What makes this Mark guy the only one that can rebuild a carb? If the original poster’s carb has a cast iron bowl, it shouldn’t be warped, but if some idiot sandblasted it, that’s why it is weeping at the gasket area. It will be wicking. 

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9 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

What makes this Mark guy the only one that can rebuild a carb?

He probably isn't but he's the only name that's been mentioned.

Some folks just believe they can't rebuild a carb and need someone to do it for them. Skilled people who can do a quality job of that are far and few between. Ask anyone locally and they just shrug their shoulders, "I dunno." Nobody knows nothing never.

I've had my share of problems with carbs that nobody can tell me how to fix. Needle sticks closed on my Super H and has for the 20-ish years I've owned it. I've had the carb apart half a dozen times, can't find anything wrong. Needle falls right out of the seat when the carb is apart. I've cleaned the needle and seat with everything conceivable. I've tried "seating" the needle as recommended. I've replaced the needle and seat multiple times. Still sticks. I have to tap on the carb bowl with a draw pin within 30 seconds of the first start of the day, after that it's fine. 

I have Super A and Cub carburetors that pi$$ gas on the ground when sitting if I don't turn off the fuel. Can't find anything wrong with any of those carburetors. Replaced needles and seats multiple times, checked float settings multiple times. Everything is "right" but if I forget and leave the fuel on, the tank is empty next time I go to use the tractor. There is no evidence of fuel leaking anywhere else but a small stain in the gravel below the carb.

My Dad's W400 floods the engine if you don't catch it and keep it running on the first fire. We've had that carburetor apart multiple times too, checked the float level repeatedly, replaced needle and seat. Can't make it work right.

This is all to say that yeah, I understand people being frustrated with carburetors. Some of us are just cursed. Others seem to have a "magic touch." They can drop-kick the dirtiest, crustiest old carb across the shop, stick it on the tractor, and it works perfectly.

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14 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

What makes this Mark guy the only one that can rebuild a carb? If the original poster’s carb has a cast iron bowl, it shouldn’t be warped, but if some idiot sandblasted it, that’s why it is weeping at the gasket area. It will be wicking. 

It probably just has float adjustment issue or needle and seat not sealing. 

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5 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

He probably isn't but he's the only name that's been mentioned.

Some folks just believe they can't rebuild a carb and need someone to do it for them. Skilled people who can do a quality job of that are far and few between. Ask anyone locally and they just shrug their shoulders, "I dunno." Nobody knows nothing never.

I've had my share of problems with carbs that nobody can tell me how to fix. Needle sticks closed on my Super H and has for the 20-ish years I've owned it. I've had the carb apart half a dozen times, can't find anything wrong. Needle falls right out of the seat when the carb is apart. I've cleaned the needle and seat with everything conceivable. I've tried "seating" the needle as recommended. I've replaced the needle and seat multiple times. Still sticks. I have to tap on the carb bowl with a draw pin within 30 seconds of the first start of the day, after that it's fine. 

I have Super A and Cub carburetors that pi$$ gas on the ground when sitting if I don't turn off the fuel. Can't find anything wrong with any of those carburetors. Replaced needles and seats multiple times, checked float settings multiple times. Everything is "right" but if I forget and leave the fuel on, the tank is empty next time I go to use the tractor. There is no evidence of fuel leaking anywhere else but a small stain in the gravel below the carb.

My Dad's W400 floods the engine if you don't catch it and keep it running on the first fire. We've had that carburetor apart multiple times too, checked the float level repeatedly, replaced needle and seat. Can't make it work right.

This is all to say that yeah, I understand people being frustrated with carburetors. Some of us are just cursed. Others seem to have a "magic touch." They can drop-kick the dirtiest, crustiest old carb across the shop, stick it on the tractor, and it works perfectly.

For the sticky needle is it a rubber tipped one?    I’ve polished the seat not to get them to stick and have even taken a drill bit used in your hand and have taken the sharp edge off the seat so it doesn’t stick.  Lots of problems with the rubber tipped needles in my opinion.  

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Just now, nate said:

It probably just has float adjustment issue or needle and seat not sealing. 

Anything is possible. I rebuild dozens every year in the shop, and within the rebuild kits I have ran across damaged seats, needles too tight or too loose, float pins too small or too short, and new floats where the hinge loops are too loose. It doesn't seem to matter where I source the kits, each piece has to be checked. 

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1 minute ago, nate said:

 Lots of problems with the rubber tipped needles in my opinion.  

I have seen some so swelled up that they stick in the bore. It was either poor fuel or just a bad nitrile compound for the tip.

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On 10/4/2023 at 7:00 AM, Matt Kirsch said:

He probably isn't but he's the only name that's been mentioned.

Some folks just believe they can't rebuild a carb and need someone to do it for them. Skilled people who can do a quality job of that are far and few between. Ask anyone locally and they just shrug their shoulders, "I dunno." Nobody knows nothing never.

I've had my share of problems with carbs that nobody can tell me how to fix. Needle sticks closed on my Super H and has for the 20-ish years I've owned it. I've had the carb apart half a dozen times, can't find anything wrong. Needle falls right out of the seat when the carb is apart. I've cleaned the needle and seat with everything conceivable. I've tried "seating" the needle as recommended. I've replaced the needle and seat multiple times. Still sticks. I have to tap on the carb bowl with a draw pin within 30 seconds of the first start of the day, after that it's fine. 

I have Super A and Cub carburetors that pi$$ gas on the ground when sitting if I don't turn off the fuel. Can't find anything wrong with any of those carburetors. Replaced needles and seats multiple times, checked float settings multiple times. Everything is "right" but if I forget and leave the fuel on, the tank is empty next time I go to use the tractor. There is no evidence of fuel leaking anywhere else but a small stain in the gravel below the carb.

My Dad's W400 floods the engine if you don't catch it and keep it running on the first fire. We've had that carburetor apart multiple times too, checked the float level repeatedly, replaced needle and seat. Can't make it work right.

This is all to say that yeah, I understand people being frustrated with carburetors. Some of us are just cursed. Others seem to have a "magic touch." They can drop-kick the dirtiest, crustiest old carb across the shop, stick it on the tractor, and it works perfectly.

I have seen the needle valve wear a divot into the brass float tang from years of use.

That kind of cocks the needle valve and locks it.

I have filled that divot with solder and filed down flat again just to test it.

The solder is soft and will wear out over time but you can determine if a new float will fix it.

Something to look at if you want.

 

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  • 1 month later...

following up on this situation.  

I was able to determine through further inspection and some sage advise from a guy who does tractor repairs for a living that the guy who rebuilt it put the wrong washer between the brass fitting with the screen that threads into the carb and fuel line connects to it on the other end... It was copper or copper washed steel, not the correct red colored crush fit one.

The red one was in the parts kit bag I got for the rebuild just waiting there.

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Not lambasting anyone.

But we see gas dripping off the bottom of a carb and start to assume a lot of things.

Gravity brings the gas to the bottom and forms a drip.

Using compressed air you can start at the top of the carb and blow off the area of the throttle shafts and with a bright light, see if fuel appears.

Then move down to the fuel line. Air and bright light.

Then down to the base gasket, etc, etc,

With the bright light, after you have blown it clean with air, you will see the gas start to form at the leak.

If you have a bad leak, just use the light and not the air. The air will vaporize the fuel and one spark and boom.

This method works the same with anti-freeze, diesel fuel, etc.

Once you have found the leak, you know what to zero in on and how to fix it.

You can buy dye now for A/C systems, engine oil but unsure about gas and diesel.

You then use a special UV light to look for the leak, which shows up very bright.

Modern technology is sometimes great?

 

 

 

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