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766 Man

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Years ago when Interstate I-80 was built they dug several sand pits along the way and dredged sand for the pavement.  Several out in the Kearny, Grand Island, Elm Creek area. We use the Elm Creek and Minden area pits for SCUBA training. 
 

About ten years ago maybe fifteen, i went looking for a new pit and got permission to dive one that no one had ever been in.  Kind of off the beaten path, through an old farm lane, weeds six foot high, dirt road ect ect..

Got in the water and soon came across a sunken cemetery.  Needless to say we didnt ever go back. Dont know anything about it, didnt ask .

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I should clarify that we know some of the names of the people buried there from old Family Bibles and old newspaper obituaries/ private diaries. Which plot they are in is unknown.

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Looks like I'm heading out after work to string trim the 80 or so stones in the church cemetery.......worst of the jobs.....hard on the back and a full spool of line.  I'd much rather spray/grade the drive,  mow, or reseed graves than weed whip......but, somebody's gotta do it.

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Normally when you buy a cemetery plot, you are buying a piece of land for eternity.

Your local, we call this office the Register of Deeds office, should have the land records for all cemeteries. 

Many they do not as it was just done and the transaction was never legally recorded.

Most cemeteries have a Sexton, who takes care of the books and records all sales and where people are buried in the cemetery.

Many of those records are lost forever for these small cemeteries. 

Today, to be buried in a cemetery, there must be a burial and land record and recorded with the city/county/township.

It is up to that agency as to whether of not a person can be buried anywhere.

We just had a guy buried on his farm and in no official cemetery.

What a mess that will make for the future owners of the property as they will need to keep that grave located and in good repair.

Small cemeteries here are charging in the neighborhood of $250/grave and this includes perpetual care. 

The large one in out town is up to $2,000/grave.

A local funeral director said they are having issues with people abandoning their relation, after death.

The living want nothing to do with the person and will not accept financial responsibility for the funeral, etc..

The County is then having to foot the bill and bury, or cremate these people, with burial in a county grave yard.

He also has people who setup the funeral and still owe him money.

Times have changed?

 

 

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In the running for "smallest cemetary"

I drive past it in my neighbors "the grave pasture" on my way to my school section. 

Family comes up every Memorial Day to trim around and add some flowers. 

It is well kept. 

Georgegrave.thumb.jpg.7e5ac3a7cbdf77540230be0e79fa269c.jpg

Georgegrave5.thumb.jpg.db189f96b3a49ea44eac039a0b23ae03.jpg

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On 9/26/2023 at 1:40 AM, td9bcf180 said:

I should clarify that we know some of the names of the people buried there from old Family Bibles and old newspaper obituaries/ private diaries. Which plot they are in is unknown.

We have an active local history group that is tracking down graves, recording locations and doing maintenance.  One of the most recent was with the cemetery at what for a while was the railhead town as the line was extended.  My father mentioned that it was supposed to have had 37 bars - I guess a bar was a tent with a set of slip rails and if they were down it was open.  There were something like 22 graves and they have found the names of about 18 via Trove and other records.  Individual grave locations are not known.  The area has been fenced and plaques made and mounted for those known.

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6 hours ago, sandhiller said:

In the running for "smallest cemetary"

I drive past it in my neighbors "the grave pasture" on my way to my school section. 

Family comes up every Memorial Day to trim around and add some flowers. 

It is well kept. 

Georgegrave.thumb.jpg.7e5ac3a7cbdf77540230be0e79fa269c.jpg

Georgegrave5.thumb.jpg.db189f96b3a49ea44eac039a0b23ae03.jpg

We rent some pasture that the owner just buried his brother on. Like 6 months ago. There is no cemetery there, just one grave in the middle of the pasture. I have no idea what they did that. I didn’t know you could do that. I guess they did it legally, but can’t swear to it. 

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2 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

We rent some pasture that the owner just buried his brother on. Like 6 months ago. There is no cemetery there, just one grave in the middle of the pasture. I have no idea what they did that. I didn’t know you could do that. I guess they did it legally, but can’t swear to it. 

According to family records and recollections, there are anywhere from 9 to 15 unmarked graves in this pasture also.

They think they have located six more and marked them with stones.

They are in rows along side the fenced in grave.

It's all a guess and no one knows for sure.

 

I haven't looked into it too deep but I think in Nebraska as long as you have a death certificate, a deceased person can be buried on private land without any other requirements.

Funeral/burial expenses can be a real hardship to some families.

 

 

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On 9/25/2023 at 10:38 AM, 766 Man said:

  Sometime I m going to walk the cemetery I am referring to.  My guess is the last burial there was around 1875-1880.  

  I stopped there last Friday after I finished up planting wheat.  The oldest grave I found was from 1834 and the newest was 1936.  Many are not readable due to weathering or simply being a marker and nothing more.  

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...just to add  to  this  topic....when I visited Brian Foster...a long time contributor to the 'Construction   Site ''  on this Red Power Forum, on his place there were two small cemeteries...this in Lorane     , Oregon..

They also dated back into the mid 1800's...were very untidy...but kind of spooky   and reading the names and seeing how young some of the children...very sad...

I know from down under, the mortality rate for  kids was very high...all for obvious reasons..

Mike

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On 9/24/2023 at 8:49 AM, acem said:

Next to one of my pastures is an old cemetery. Hasn't been maintained in my 56 years. All the graves date from the early 1900s when coal mining was big here. It's hard to tell it's a cemetery now. Just grown up in brush 

How did they mine coal in the low lands?  Isnt the water table high?  Just curious.

You should hit it with a few gallons of cross bow and roundup Ace.  At least slow the over growth for respect.  I love old cemeteries.  Just peace and history.  Quiet.  So many "1901 baby".... make you appreciate this era of medicine and ease of life really

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On 9/26/2023 at 6:11 AM, Diesel Doctor said:

Normally when you buy a cemetery plot, you are buying a piece of land for eternity.

Your local, we call this office the Register of Deeds office, should have the land records for all cemeteries. 

Many they do not as it was just done and the transaction was never legally recorded.

Most cemeteries have a Sexton, who takes care of the books and records all sales and where people are buried in the cemetery.

Many of those records are lost forever for these small cemeteries. 

Today, to be buried in a cemetery, there must be a burial and land record and recorded with the city/county/township.

It is up to that agency as to whether of not a person can be buried anywhere.

We just had a guy buried on his farm and in no official cemetery.

What a mess that will make for the future owners of the property as they will need to keep that grave located and in good repair.

Small cemeteries here are charging in the neighborhood of $250/grave and this includes perpetual care. 

The large one in out town is up to $2,000/grave.

A local funeral director said they are having issues with people abandoning their relation, after death.

The living want nothing to do with the person and will not accept financial responsibility for the funeral, etc..

The County is then having to foot the bill and bury, or cremate these people, with burial in a county grave yard.

He also has people who setup the funeral and still owe him money.

Times have changed?

 

 

Yeah thats sad.  But have you seen what those criminals charge to bury someone?  I general don't get angry at someones rate but when your against a wall and a love one just died they sure feel like extortion.

A plot in the main cemetery in my town (if there are any left..?) Last family we knew paid 5500 for the spot!  Little country one up the road is 400 iirc.  Should just buy some

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3 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

How did they mine coal in the low lands?  Isnt the water table high?  Just curious.

You should hit it with a few gallons of cross bow and roundup Ace.  At least slow the over growth for respect

When they shaft mined the coal they almost always had a have a drain systems and pumps to remove the water. Even on higher ground water would seep in. They had ventilation shafts. Some blew air in, some out. These let water in as well. One of my pump sites is at the the mine pump site (according to the old timers). My larger pump site is drilled into the mines at a convenient location. We drilled through an old air shaft.

The cemetery is adjacent to but not on my property. It's on an neighbors property. I'll leave it alone.

Most local cemetery plots are of minimal cost, if any. The county digs all graves for free in our county. One neighbor's family dug her grave and filled it back in by hand. It's traditional for their tribe. I helped fill it in after the funeral. It was powerful. There was a wake type gathering afterwards. We burned her belongings at the wake.

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On 9/24/2023 at 8:28 PM, 660 driver said:

Sounds like said dozer operator needs some more seat time along with a lesson in respect. Even if the customer told me to i wouldnt knock over headstones.

Well was it a matter of the stones just being so precariously balanced that the movement induced by the dozer being nearby caused them to topple over, OR was it because he was physically hitting them with the dozer?

One is unavoidable. One is inexcusable.

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18 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Well was it a matter of the stones just being so precariously balanced that the movement induced by the dozer being nearby caused them to topple over, OR was it because he was physically hitting them with the dozer?

One is unavoidable. One is inexcusable.

  They were hit by the dozer and it was not like they were hidden in weeds as the cemetery is frequently mowed.  If they were hidden and just fell over due to the ground shaking I would not be carrying on about it.  

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12 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I imagine everyone in the cemetery either couldn’t care less about what they left behind in this world or has much bigger problems than their headstone falling over. As long as they put them all back how they were, everything is fine. 

  You need to get into the spirit of the season.  Halloween. Ghosts. Curses.  I do believe IF it was me who knocked them over then there would be all kinds of bad luck coming.  As far as saying anything to the dozer operator I have no plans to discuss anything with him.  

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17 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

Yeah thats sad.  But have you seen what those criminals charge to bury someone?  I general don't get angry at someones rate but when your against a wall and a love one just died they sure feel like extortion.

A plot in the main cemetery in my town (if there are any left..?) Last family we knew paid 5500 for the spot!  Little country one up the road is 400 iirc.  Should just buy some

My dad had the foresight to have some plots bought a long time ago. Doubt he paid much for them

Me and the boys did the burying of my mom and dads cremains so no additional cost there.

I know from talking to others it can get very expensive and it goes against a person's nature to argue price when the hurt of losing a loved one is still fresh.

IMG_20230924_133258688.thumb.jpg.294ed38be9e6b9f97f128fb9b2195c17.jpg

 

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A cousin and his wife caused some consternation in the local shire (county) office when they came in and announced that "We wanted to book a room" - as in a plot in the local cemetry.

He was the one who provided the link that I used to get documentation to my father's terse comment that "We linked QANTAS to medicine before the Flying Doctor"

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Some pics of a local cemetery sitting on the bluffs above the American Bottoms (just south of St. Louis on the Illinois side). The mausoleum dominates the site, but there are lots of individual graves too.  

Lots of the stones are unreadable now, but in spite of vandalism the Miles Cemetery is pretty well maintained.

In rural Monroe County, Illinois lies a cemetery that holds much local history. A window to the past, the cemetery remains the final resting place for at least 450 individuals. The cemetery has a unique history that began with an Indian burial ground and became a place to bury the dead of the American Bottoms. A mausoleum built into the bluffs has endured hard times and today still stands as a local landmark. The story behind Eagle Cliff-Miles Cemetery is one that although neglected over time, holds a place in history.

https://www.mckendree.edu/academics/scholars/issue14/oberto.htm

 

Eagle Cliff Cemetery, Miles Mausoleum - Monroe County, Illinois

 

Eagle Cliff Cemetery, Miles Mausoleum - Monroe County, Illinois

 

Eagle Cliff-Miles Cemetery In Waterloo, Illinois Native American Burial Site

 

 

Grave site of Shadrach Bond at Miles Cemetery, rural Monroe County, Illinois. Photo by Barbara ...

 

 

Eagle Cliff-Miles Cemetery In Waterloo, Illinois Native American Burial Site

 

 

 

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