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Harvest time pics


billonthefarm

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Cutting the last of the good rice today. Standing water everywhere. It's a mud pit.

Wife stuck the 826 on the grain cart. It's got R1 tires. R1 is useless in these conditions. Had to pull her out with the 4366.

She really loaded up the old Chevy.

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22 hours ago, SDman said:

Sunflower harvest. The dust in the pictures doesn't do justice to what becomes a real fire hazard when the conditions are right. No wind is just as deadly as too much wind.

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In sunflowers, punch into your phone, 911, and be ready to hit SEND!

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5 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

In sunflowers, punch into your phone, 911, and be ready to hit SEND!

Yes, you are right. Sounds like a John Deere STS burned up over by Pierre yesterday afternoon while doing sunflowers. Sounds like the grain cart operator told him he was smoking, the guy stopped and got out of the cab to inspect for a fire...and promptly reached back in the cab for his cell phone, and then bailed. The fire took over so fast that he was lucky to even get his phone. 

These machines I have in these pictures had something interesting in terms of fires....2 of the 3 New Hollands had hot sparks coming from the exhaust...while the other machine never had any sparks. Further inspection revealed that the 2 machines on fire had the inner pipe from the tailpipe extending past the heat shield, while the other machine didn't have any inner pipe extending from the heat shield. The material would build up on the inner pipe about 1/4" to 3/8" thick, then smolder, and then fall off, causing a cinder fire. That tailpipe comes all welded together, its not like you can adjust the inner/outer pipes to eliminate the protruding inner pipe. I've got a field report turned into New Holland about this....we will see what they have to say about it. 

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The rice as harvested (rough, paddy or cargo rice) has a husk similar to oats. 

Remove the husk and you have brown rice.

Remove the bran and you have white rice.

You can cook rough rice but it would be difficult to eat with all the husk. Kinda like eating oatmeal with the hull in it.

Rice doesn't kill birds either. That's a lie started by the bird seed industry!

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8 hours ago, SDman said:

Yes, you are right. Sounds like a John Deere STS burned up over by Pierre yesterday afternoon while doing sunflowers. Sounds like the grain cart operator told him he was smoking, the guy stopped and got out of the cab to inspect for a fire...and promptly reached back in the cab for his cell phone, and then bailed. The fire took over so fast that he was lucky to even get his phone. 

These machines I have in these pictures had something interesting in terms of fires....2 of the 3 New Hollands had hot sparks coming from the exhaust...while the other machine never had any sparks. Further inspection revealed that the 2 machines on fire had the inner pipe from the tailpipe extending past the heat shield, while the other machine didn't have any inner pipe extending from the heat shield. The material would build up on the inner pipe about 1/4" to 3/8" thick, then smolder, and then fall off, causing a cinder fire. That tailpipe comes all welded together, its not like you can adjust the inner/outer pipes to eliminate the protruding inner pipe. I've got a field report turned into New Holland about this....we will see what they have to say about it. 

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We have raised some flowers over the years. It’s not a common crop here. I never had a fire from them. I have had lots of fires started in soybeans. I wonder if the geography affects the oil content differently? I have never had flowers tested for oil content as we only sell into the bird seed market. A very warm, dry fall is hard to keep the bean dust from smoldering here. 

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10 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

We have raised some flowers over the years. It’s not a common crop here. I never had a fire from them. I have had lots of fires started in soybeans. I wonder if the geography affects the oil content differently? I have never had flowers tested for oil content as we only sell into the bird seed market. A very warm, dry fall is hard to keep the bean dust from smoldering here. 

In regards to sunflowers, your climate is probably similar to acem's in that your sunflowers probably never have a killing frost...that is when all of our problems with sunflowers and fires start. That white "meat" in both the stalk and the back of the head is what they call the "pith"....that is the fire material on a sunflower plant. After a killing frost, many years we will get several days of high temperatures in the 70s/80s.....it really dries out the stalk in a hurry, and then the fire issue will raise its ugly head again. If we get a rain, or some heavy dew/fog, the problem will go away again for a few days. 

This year the sunflower guys are pretty upset with their crop overall. Seems as though the EPA banned one of the chemicals sunflower producers use to kill all the weevils and bugs in the sunflowers while they are flowering. The chemical companies came up with a cheaper alternative that was legal....but everybody is finding out the stuff didn't work very well. You look at the seeds and they all have holes in them from the bugs....there is no "meat" inside the seed hulls. The combines are blowing a substantial amount of seeds out the back end of the combine because there is nothing in the seed...its nothing you want in the grain tank anyway. My understanding is that there is a court case going on on this matter up in North Dakota claiming the EPA overstepped its authority by doing this....I guess we will see. 

As far as soybeans, you are correct that they can become problematic with combines and fires, too. Pretty much any kind of an oilseed can cause fire issues.

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41 minutes ago, SDman said:

In regards to sunflowers, your climate is probably similar to acem's in that your sunflowers probably never have a killing frost...that is when all of our problems with sunflowers and fires start. That white "meat" in both the stalk and the back of the head is what they call the "pith"....that is the fire material on a sunflower plant. After a killing frost, many years we will get several days of high temperatures in the 70s/80s.....it really dries out the stalk in a hurry, and then the fire issue will raise its ugly head again. If we get a rain, or some heavy dew/fog, the problem will go away again for a few days. 

This year the sunflower guys are pretty upset with their crop overall. Seems as though the EPA banned one of the chemicals sunflower producers use to kill all the weevils and bugs in the sunflowers while they are flowering. The chemical companies came up with a cheaper alternative that was legal....but everybody is finding out the stuff didn't work very well. You look at the seeds and they all have holes in them from the bugs....there is no "meat" inside the seed hulls. The combines are blowing a substantial amount of seeds out the back end of the combine because there is nothing in the seed...its nothing you want in the grain tank anyway. My understanding is that there is a court case going on on this matter up in North Dakota claiming the EPA overstepped its authority by doing this....I guess we will see. 

As far as soybeans, you are correct that they can become problematic with combines and fires, too. Pretty much any kind of an oilseed can cause fire issues.

That is interesting. You are correct about our sunflowers not having a killing frost. I had never heard that correlation before. Are guys having problems with test weight because of the bug damage? If so, I know what a problem that can be. I don’t know anyone who will buy them with less than 27 lb test weight, even for bird seed. 

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1 hour ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

That is interesting. You are correct about our sunflowers not having a killing frost. I had never heard that correlation before. Are guys having problems with test weight because of the bug damage? If so, I know what a problem that can be. I don’t know anyone who will buy them with less than 27 lb test weight, even for bird seed. 

About 1 year in 10, the sunflowers will dry down naturally before a killing frost....then you don't see fire issues. If you see damp, green sunflower heads & stalks coming out of the back of a combine, you should be OK. Its when you see the dry dust like in my pictures above you are on pins & needles the entire time you are in the combine. They get blown off several times a day, but the worry is always there. Most of the time the grain cart operator is the first one to notice somebody is smoking.

One thing that CNH has done this year on both colors of their combines is they have installed what they call "blow-off kits" from the factory. It uses an air compressor, air tank, and has an enclosure around the exhaust manifold on the engine to seal it off from the outside air. This system blows air from the compressor system at a rate of every 2 minutes into the enclosure around the exhaust manifold to keep it clean from debris. However, the rest of the entire exhaust/SCR system has no provision to keep it clean, everything else is double-wall piped to keep the outer pipe temperatures rather cool...although dust collects pretty thick on these components in sunflowers.

As far as light sunflowers, you are correct in that nobody wants light sunflowers...just like any other commodity that has low test weight. Around here, it seems to vary year to year as to whether they are grown for oilseed or for birdseed....whatever the market wants is what they try to grow. We do see some confectionary sunflowers for human consumption raised here, but that's a small % of the market. At this point, most guys are just putting sunflowers in the bin with the hope that they can haul them into the elevators later this winter when they usually are not so fussy.

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acem, pardon my ignorance, but how is rice marketed.....by bushel, by hundredweight, or some other way? I've never even thought about how rice is marketed/sold as a commodity. Is there any established test weight per bushel? 

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27 minutes ago, SDman said:

acem, pardon my ignorance, but how is rice marketed.....by bushel, by hundredweight, or some other way? I've never even thought about how rice is marketed/sold as a commodity. Is there any established test weight per bushel? 

Uh. It's complicated.

It varies by region. It can be sold by the bushel, hundred weight, ton or barrel depending on region. The Chicago price is traded in hundred weight. Arkansas usually sells by the bushel.

Different types of rice can vary in weight but long grain rough (paddy, cargo, etc-what we harvest) runs 45 lb per bushel. However milling yield is more important than test weight. Below is a good description of milling yield by a late friend of mine, Terry Seibenmorgan.

Milling yield is a term that is often referred to as
“milling quality”; this term is often used in reference to
HRY but also is routinely expressed as a ratio, with the
numerator being the head rice yield and the denomina-
tor the milled rice yield. For example, a milling yield
of 55/70 would indicate a HRY of 55 percent, a MRY
of 70 percent and a brokens yield of 15 percent (the
difference between MRY and HRY).

Remember you look at rice while eating it. Visual quality is very important. We harvest rice at high moisture to avoid breaking or cracking the kernel. If the kernel is cracked it will break during milling. The AXIAL-FLOW combine is gental on the kernels and helps maintain good milling yields.

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A few pics from last week/weekend. Finished off the wheat, pretty much done harvest. Morning after we finished the yard was like a skating rink. Got hit hard with freezing rain. Very thankful it held off till we finished. Pushed through almost 300 acres in 40ish hours. 2 combines and 1 truck. Was no stopping lol

And yes that's snow on the ground. Fortunately the wheat stood good through the snowfalls the last couple weeks. Anything swathed had too much snow to put through the combine. Still a pile of crop on the ground around here

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And the last passes

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9 hours ago, midnightman said:

Glad to see you got it done. Heard there’s quite a few acres left out in your area, but haven’t made a trip north for a few weeks to see for myself. I’m thinking you’re probably happy you got the new to you combine for this season 

Still got a bit of oats swaths to pick up but too much snow in them. We tried it but went 100 yards and the combine is full of snow and half the oats/snow mix is still stuck in the hopper lol. Looking at the forecast we thought we might get it off yet but got about 6" snow now and still falling so not too hopeful now. But yea north of the valley, more so around the 45, there is lots of canola on the ground and still some cereals yet. Pretty much everything we took off in the last month will have to go through the dryer now too. New combine really sped up the canola harvest, wasn't a big difference on wheat other than needed 1 less person since straight cutting with 2 now. That auger header is ok but next year it will get a draper and then it will speed things up. We were doing about the same acres/hour and dad was pushing 10 more feet then me but was having trouble feeding the short straw where as I could speed up where it was light

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Had a good day in some good corn. Sun actually came out this morning for a couple hours. Snow sleet and freezing rain tonight and rain tomorrow. Looks decent after Saturday so hoping a good push next week and wrap up 

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