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Fun topic...where to move if had too


TroyDairy

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KY has a lot to commend it, but I have noticed that their leadership has gotten a lot more left-leaning the last few years (compared to us in TN). I don't know what's driving that...Lexington and Louisville, I guess? Those from there can speak more intelligently about it.

 

You're more than welcome here in TN. I believe you all would like it. But there is basically ZERO dairy. I know of only 3 within an hour's drive.

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  A red state is apt to have less crippling regulations now and in the future than a blue state.  3,000,000 is a lot of money to lose if a state writes laws that will not allow you to conduct business.  Back 20 plus years ago I would not worry about it but the attitudes carried today by those age 40 and younger are worrisome for industries such as agriculture.  Remember a state such as Virginia is heavily influenced by the population spillover from DC.  

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I think where I live, Arkansas River valley, would be a good area for a dairy.

There are areas of crop land along the Arkansas River, most have water available for irrigation. It's good cropland but prone to drought and flood. The cattle should graze and milk up in the hills. We're right off I-40 which makes transportation easy. Land is hard to find to rent but can be bought occasionally. Typical price is $3000 per acre, crop or pasture. Was less until recently. The combination of ag in the valley and mountains to the north and south is nice to me.

I've met a larger dairy family almost a hundred miles east of here. They have some sandy cropland near the river with center pivots. They plant oats in the fall and chop silage around Christmas. Replant oats in February (if winter killed) and chop in May. Then plant corn and chop in October. Repeat.. It's intensive but works good. It's not possible without the sandy ground and irrigation. December can be too wet on silt Loam and clay soils for chopping. Corn is unreliable here without irrigation. 

Another similar area is the red river valley of south Arkansas and north Louisiana. No mountains but milder winter.

There used to be a lot of dairies round here. Over 30 in my county but only one now and it's small.  The younger farmers chose poultry instead of dairy. It's easier and makes a living. So when a dairy farmer retires they shut down.

Property and income Taxes are reasonable here. Sales tax is around 10% but most ag specific purchases are exempt.

Always wanted to have a dairy but Don't know how to run one. I always figured it wasn't something I should borrow a bunch of money and learn how...

You need to take a long vacation/road trip and check out the areas you're looking at. Also study weather patterns, soils, taxes, laws and attitudes. We're favorable in these categories except it can  get hot in the summer.

I think north Florida would also make a good dairy. Plenty of rain. No winter. Not as hot as Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Western Arkansas but very humid.

How many cows you wanting to milk?

Below is a pic of one of my rice fields. 

PXL_20230819_125028136.jpg

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4 hours ago, EquipmentJunkie said:

I will let the discussion for the experts except for one point.  The H2O issue that is driving you out of WA will always be there with a dairy.  Water usage is a major factor no matter where you go.  When it comes down to it, milk is fortified water.  Don't hamper yourself in that department.  Best wishes in your search.

When we were milking the only water we didn't recycle was what the cows converted to milk. Water makes a circle. I'm confident that we all have used water our ancestors used before 

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2 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  A red state is apt to have less crippling regulations now and in the future than a blue state.  3,000,000 is a lot of money to lose if a state writes laws that will not allow you to conduct business.  Back 20 plus years ago I would not worry about it but the attitudes carried today by those age 40 and younger are worrisome for industries such as agriculture.  Remember a state such as Virginia is heavily influenced by the population spillover from DC.  

Exactly...30- 35000/ac here was standard last year.  Now with water deal banks are saying 'hang on here' and 10k is most they think they could loan on it.  So if we wait and sell we may get alot less $ than going asap

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26 minutes ago, cjf711 said:

Whereever i can have access to irrigation water, and has the coolest summer

Yeah... i really think we are more anti cold winter than hot summer!  I hate thenlast few wintwrs here with sub 10* weeks.  Very new to us.

But cows do like the cooler areas.  Crossvent barns solve alot of the heat issue but $10000 per head to build 

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2 hours ago, acem said:

I think where I live, Arkansas River valley, would be a good area for a dairy.

There are areas of crop land along the Arkansas River, most have water available for irrigation. It's good cropland but prone to drought and flood. The cattle should graze and milk up in the hills. We're right off I-40 which makes transportation easy. Land is hard to find to rent but can be bought occasionally. Typical price is $3000 per acre, crop or pasture. Was less until recently. The combination of ag in the valley and mountains to the north and south is nice to me.

I've met a larger dairy family almost a hundred miles east of here. They have some sandy cropland near the river with center pivots. They plant oats in the fall and chop silage around Christmas. Replant oats in February (if winter killed) and chop in May. Then plant corn and chop in October. Repeat.. It's intensive but works good. It's not possible without the sandy ground and irrigation. December can be too wet on silt Loam and clay soils for chopping. Corn is unreliable here without irrigation. 

Another similar area is the red river valley of south Arkansas and north Louisiana. No mountains but milder winter.

There used to be a lot of dairies round here. Over 30 in my county but only one now and it's small.  The younger farmers chose poultry instead of dairy. It's easier and makes a living. So when a dairy farmer retires they shut down.

Property and income Taxes are reasonable here. Sales tax is around 10% but most ag specific purchases are exempt.

Always wanted to have a dairy but Don't know how to run one. I always figured it wasn't something I should borrow a bunch of money and learn how...

You need to take a long vacation/road trip and check out the areas you're looking at. Also study weather patterns, soils, taxes, laws and attitudes. We're favorable in these categories except it can  get hot in the summer.

I think north Florida would also make a good dairy. Plenty of rain. No winter. Not as hot as Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Western Arkansas but very humid.

How many cows you wanting to milk?

Below is a pic of one of my rice fields. 

PXL_20230819_125028136.jpg

AR is interesting.... but i dont know where milk could go.  I would like to speak to the big dairy you mentioned.  And the heat... cows and 100+ and 100% would be huge issue to overcome.

DeLaval service guy in KY did a parlor for a 3000 hd dairy down on the FL/GA corner of AR.  I should see if he has a # for that fella.

Yall S of MAson Dix need to put some swamp cooler in to cool it down!

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3 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

The new "taking" attempt is for Every type of water use.  Home owner, association, irrigation, cattle, towns, every drop of surface and well water is on the docket to be scrutinize.  The certified "were sueing you" letters from the DOE are coming early April.

I feel for you and do not envy your position.

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1 hour ago, bitty said:

When we were milking the only water we didn't recycle was what the cows converted to milk. Water makes a circle. I'm confident that we all have used water our ancestors used before 

I get it and know how that all works.  However, do the regulatory agencies see it that way?  Some special interest lobbyist gets in a lawmaker's ear explaining how agriculture industries are such bad stewards of natural resources.  It seems especially true with ag that deals with animals.  Common sense is getting to be a very scarce resource, if you ask me.

A good friend of mine has relatives who had a small dairy farm in Western MD.  About 10 years ago, the do-gooders in Annapolis decided that all dairies in the state of MD must install manure containment facilities in order to help reduce manure run-off in the Chesapeake Bay.  That is a well and good, but this particular farm was west of the Eastern Continental Divide.  All their runoff would eventually flow to the Mississippi River.  No exception was made.  Due to this law and other factors, this farm decided to get out of producing milk.

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1 hour ago, TroyDairy said:

Exactly...30- 35000/ac here was standard last year.  Now with water deal banks are saying 'hang on here' and 10k is most they think they could loan on it.  So if we wait and sell we may get alot less $ than going asap

That is unfortunate.  I really feel for you Troy.  I think a lot of us are hoping that we will never be in a similar situation, but who knows these day..  I'm tied to my land by family which would make it extremely hard to leave, but then again I am not trying to make a living off my property.

Whatever you decide, good luck and god speed to you.  As a note, I really enjoy my dairy products, so I can't do much, but I try my best to consume more than my fair share.

 

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1 hour ago, TroyDairy said:

AR is interesting.... but i dont know where milk could go.  I would like to speak to the big dairy you mentioned.  And the heat... cows and 100+ and 100% would be huge issue to overcome.

DeLaval service guy in KY did a parlor for a 3000 hd dairy down on the FL/GA corner of AR.  I should see if he has a # for that fella.

Yall S of MAson Dix need to put some swamp cooler in to cool it down!

I'll try to get their contact info. I see them at crop meetings but they are also a friend of a friend.

Arkansas has dairy plants at larger cities. We are a milk importing state. Highland is the processor I see in fort Smith and Fayetteville. 

Oddly enough Louisiana has alot more dairies than Arkansas. I expect it's because we have so many poultry farms. Poultry farms are everywhere round here. At least it makes litter affordable.

I know another family that quit milking but still grows crops, kinda like @bitty. They have made silage with rice. Said it was pretty good and about all they that year (bad drought). They told me to make baleage with my rice chaff right behind the combine. It's still green and works for beef cows.

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Looking around on Google, Texas is the #5 milk producing state. Probably alot of production at feedlot type dairies in the dry plains of west Texas. They can get feed from the irrigated areas. Interesting.

It gets very hot but dry in west Texas. Can get cold in the winter. Lots of wind.

There was a fire this spring at a large dairy in west Texas. Killed 18,000 cows and one person. That's over 3 times as many dairy cows as the entire state of Arkansas!

https://www.texastribune.org/2023/05/19/cows-dairy-farm-texas-investigation/

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On 9/12/2023 at 6:40 AM, Lazy WP said:

All depends on what part of agriculture you’re interested in. Beef, Nebraska wins hands down, grain and dairy probably goes to Missouri if for no other reason then transportation. 
Nebraska property taxes are the reason I don’t live in Nebraska. Most grain markets use Kansas City as their basis or Chicago, so that’s a bonus for Missouri. Nebraska, you better be willing to drive. Sandhillers closest equipment dealer is 60 plus miles away. 
I don’t know much about Kentucky so can’t say much about it. 

Having to drive 60 miles for a dealer would certainly be an inconvenience however im pretty sure its because he is not really in an area in Nebraska known for  “ Row Crop” type of farming. In my area for example i have 4 dealers, one is 14 miles away, one 16 one 20 and one 30 . Just have to call one to see which one actually has the part. Occasionally even get it dropped off on an employees way home.  As for moving here and buying some land, good luck, it rarely comes up for sale and when it does you better bring your big check book. An 80 just four miles from my saline county farm sold a few years ago for 20k an acre. Then theres that matter of taxe’s .  

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Broken Bow dairy is just over an hour from me.  Milk has to travel for sure, but ground is cheaper-ish.   PM me if I can help in any way.  I want to see you continue to succeed, and I will help any way I can, even if it steers you away......

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If I had to, I would move about 50' south and build my house into the side of the hill it sits on so the bottom floor was same level as the shop and everything else and I wouldn't have to walk up and down that damn hill.

That's about as far away as I would want to move.🤠

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4 hours ago, sandhiller said:

If I had to, I would move about 50' south and build my house into the side of the hill it sits on so the bottom floor was same level as the shop and everything else and I wouldn't have to walk up and down that damn hill.

That's about as far away as I would want to move.🤠

Sandhiller

Do A "Coober Pedy"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coober_Pedy

and run the rest of the house underground at the same level.

I'm not suggesting you'll find opal though.

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3 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

Sandhiller

Do A "Coober Pedy"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coober_Pedy

and run the rest of the house underground at the same level.

I'm not suggesting you'll find opal though.

I think it makes sense to build under ground for the insulating properties summer and winter.

If nothing else it's fun to say😄

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44 minutes ago, Gearclash said:

@TroyDairy what about Wisconsin?  Being of dairy background I would not consider building or buying a dairy in a area that was both hot and humid.  Those conditions cost a dairy more money than any other problem.

I agree that climate is slightly up there in things to consider when relocating. Although there is some big dairies in hot places 

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I don't have a problem with the cold weather y'all get. I have a problem with all the salt y'all use to destroy vehicles. I swear it's a scam by the auto manufacturers.

There are good dairies in Louisiana and Florida. You just have to adapt. Year round growing season makes north Florida pretty attractive.

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