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Fun topic...where to move if had too


TroyDairy

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Neighbor just told me last week that he’s selling milk for $18 per 100 and then the hauler just tacked on another $1.80 per 100 for fuel surcharge. We’re in Illinois across the river and a little north of Cape

55 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

We need to leave WA.  You guys grumbling about your state and its things have 0 idea.  Now the state wants to take away our wells for the indians.  Even thought my water is 100% proven to be part of the Fraser river system IN CANADA!!  So how I am affecting the tribe 20 miles S is loonacy.  AND I will still need to hire attorney and etc etc to prove I can use water which I already have permit to use.  OT is killing us with 24/7 work.  The hispanic fellas are leaving since 750000 is the avg home price and rent for a 2bd is 1700, 3bd 2500.  We just cant keep paying.  NE taxes are still less than here.  We're $130+/acre now if you put it all together.  Our Gov is a narcissistic fool and his AG whom is running next year is WAY more liberal and anti-ag.  But Seattle will vote him in...100%  I serve on the county and state Farm Bureau and see weekly the horrible policy coming from our capital and it's no question set-up to crush farmers to take over.  I used to think that was crazy talk but now there cannot be any more debate it's so obvious.  The liberals think they know best and can do it more 'equitable' so we need to get them dang white unfair farmers off the land.

 

If we want to continue esp if we want our kids to have a opportunity (or curse?) it 100% cannot be here anymore.  Sad to see the distain for ag in our state keep growing as we try so to 'teach' people and get them to see 'our story'.... it aint working let me tell you.

Been to KY, Been to OK.  Like to see the empty Kiwi farm in Benton MO this winter.  Looks promising.  Not sure I will comprehend the humidity....  The SE is begging for dairies to come there.  Lot of small guy quitting and milk being trucked from ID ILL etc and fuel prices are not making that workable anymore.  Been actually called by folks in SC, GA, KY, MO, MS, KS, NE ND.  SD is full and expensive and the worse milk price in NA last 8 months.  IA too $$$$.  Indiana...maybe.  IL, **** no.  Feel along the River is required.  I-29, I-55 and 51.  MO thinks S of Cape Giradue ....lots of land and flat and wanting manure region but 0 dairy service.  NE NE is promising since IA infrastructure is close.  Norfolk has a plant that adding on.

Lots of frustration and questions....  be easier to quit I guess and keep my money but new estate tax will soak me it we dont spend $ asap.  Just thievery.  We pay and pay which is fine.  But when we die and sell we need to pay again is BS imho.

 

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23 minutes ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

One bonus here is we have a big Agropur Cheese plant. Milk coming in from all over. 

 

https://www.agropur.com/us/sites/agropurus/files/documents/22-0630b Agropur Quarterly Connection-Issue06.pdf

Wont take any more milk.  Old school mate/neighbor just had to sell out in Sebley (sp) east of Sioux Center..  said $12/ milk.  Needs 18 19 nowdays.  We need 21

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7 minutes ago, Alan Dinan said:

Neighbor just told me last week that he’s selling milk for $18 per 100 and then the hauler just tacked on another $1.80 per 100 for fuel surcharge. We’re in Illinois across the river and a little north of Cape

 

Thats good info.  The administration fuel energy policy is hurting so much.  Here we have a new carbon program.... $5.40 avg diesel now.

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Arkansas is very farmer friendly.So are all the surrounding states.

Water (and humidity) is plentiful east of the Louisiana/Texas, Arkansas/Oklahoma, Missouri/Kansas, Iowa/Nebraska state lines. West of these lines water laws start to get different and west of I-35 it gets dry.

More crop options south of the mason Dixon line (rice, cotton, peanut). 

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49 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

Thats good info.  The administration fuel energy policy is hurting so much.  Here we have a new carbon program.... $5.40 avg diesel now.

Diesel is $4.50 here in south Chica.. I mean Illinois. But it’s about $0.75 cheaper across the creek. I’m a half hour away from Missouri with a transfer tank in the truck.

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I am close to Stone Ridge farm which is the biggest dairy in Illinois. Think it's been here since 2008. 

 

I would move west but only after I won the lottery because if it's gonna snow a ton I want to have all the toys and easy removal tools. As well as a HUGE generator.

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What was the deal with the dairy north of Broken Bow Nebraska? I thought you looked at it? I know the few times I delivered there, I had to get pulled out. 
I would seriously consider Popular Bluff are of Missouri. Not sure what it is that I like about it, but every time I’ve been through there I enjoy it, well there was one time maybe not so much. 
Western Kansas is full of dairy cows, which you already knew, but they keep expanding. 
North East Nebraska is okay, but the 3 bigger towns in Nebraska dictate what policies are adopted. Guess that’s part of the draw to Missouri. I think there’s enough people in the rural areas to overturn the urban vote. 

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Neighbor dairy farm here is for sale, brand new rotary,brand new $900,000 shop, several new barns, very productive ground just not enough for number of cows. However it is NY so there is that. 

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Property taxes aren’t too bad here. Opportunity is a different story. Row crop farming with HIGH rent is norm. 5000 acre operations are norm and 10000 plus acres are common. Labor is not as available as it once was. Lots of Mexican workers to fill spots on dairies or manual labor (tobacco and poultry) farms. 
This is Western KY I speak of. 
I have thought of other states myself but never had enough guts to move.  I’d hate to move now in my fifties, but I might…….

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11 minutes ago, Cool1566 said:

Property taxes aren’t too bad here. Opportunity is a different story. Row crop farming with HIGH rent is norm. 5000 acre operations are norm and 10000 plus acres are common. Labor is not as available as it once was. Lots of Mexican workers to fill spots on dairies or manual labor (tobacco and poultry) farms. 
This is Western KY I speak of. 
I have thought of other states myself but never had enough guts to move.  I’d hate to move now in my fifties, but I might…….

I don’t know where you can go that wouldn’t be just like that. I’m in Missouri and it’s the same way here, except they canceled all of our tobacco contacts. So it is no longer an option to raise that crop. Big time rent and huge acres is the name of the game. 

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1 hour ago, Lazy WP said:

What was the deal with the dairy north of Broken Bow Nebraska? I thought you looked at it? I know the few times I delivered there, I had to get pulled out. 
I would seriously consider Popular Bluff are of Missouri. Not sure what it is that I like about it, but every time I’ve been through there I enjoy it, well there was one time maybe not so much. 
Western Kansas is full of dairy cows, which you already knew, but they keep expanding. 
North East Nebraska is okay, but the 3 bigger towns in Nebraska dictate what policies are adopted. Guess that’s part of the draw to Missouri. I think there’s enough people in the rural areas to overturn the urban vote. 

Its too far from everything.  I dont know why they thought being alone that far from a major E W hiway was wise.  And workers...you need to near something where people can/like to live too.  The one [2] in McCook are for sale too.  Same thing...so far from dairy service and plants now.

I wonder if she is still milking in Broken Bow?

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50 minutes ago, Cool1566 said:

Property taxes aren’t too bad here. Opportunity is a different story. Row crop farming with HIGH rent is norm. 5000 acre operations are norm and 10000 plus acres are common. Labor is not as available as it once was. Lots of Mexican workers to fill spots on dairies or manual labor (tobacco and poultry) farms. 
This is Western KY I speak of. 
I have thought of other states myself but never had enough guts to move.  I’d hate to move now in my fifties, but I might…….

Interesting....i didnt realize the farms in W KY were that big.  Around Hopkinsville most seem smaller brother thought after his visit.  Id like to start with 1000 1200hd then work up as land/relationships go.  Was told West of Cadiz land gets stickier..?  

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36 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I don’t know where you can go that wouldn’t be just like that. I’m in Missouri and it’s the same way here, except they canceled all of our tobacco contacts. So it is no longer an option to raise that crop. Big time rent and huge acres is the name of the game. 

What are guys growing for high rent?   Here its raspberries... $800 to 1000/ac 10 year cycle 

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Move to the ole "shine-ah-door valley" (Shenandoah Valley of Va.) beautiful place, lots of dairy, poultry, gnats, fleas and few snakes here and there. 

Lots of infrastructure to support dairy and poultry operations. Couple 1000+ head dairies here in valley.

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40 minutes ago, CIHTECH said:

Move to the ole "shine-ah-door valley" (Shenandoah Valley of Va.) beautiful place, lots of dairy, poultry, gnats, fleas and few snakes here and there. 

Lots of infrastructure to support dairy and poultry operations. Couple 1000+ head dairies here in valley.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2164-Lee-Hwy-Mount-Sidney-VA-24467/107819202_zpid/

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/135-Cattleman-Rd-Swoope-VA-24479/218621136_zpid/

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/307-Swope-Ln-Fairfield-VA-24435/108040964_zpid/

This one is farther south, but already a dairy operation https://www.dairyrealty.com/8832179/458-Acres-Boones-Mill-VA-Franklin-County-Dairy-Farm

 

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I sure wish you well in your search Troy. Living in Illinois, I would never suggest anyone move here. The NE corner of the state runs everything and the 98%+ of the rest of the state (geographically speaking) gets the scraps. People who aren’t tied to the land by means of farming or ownership are moving away from here.     The difference I see is that we are the second largest corn producing state in the country (I believe) and too much of the state’s revenue comes from Ag to completely ruin that sector. Best of luck in your search. 

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I will let the discussion for the experts except for one point.  The H2O issue that is driving you out of WA will always be there with a dairy.  Water usage is a major factor no matter where you go.  When it comes down to it, milk is fortified water.  Don't hamper yourself in that department.  Best wishes in your search.

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17 hours ago, Mudfly said:

Not one of your options per se, but South Dakota (Adjacent to Nebraska) would be on my list to look at.

 

Those that come here have to be tough to put up with 100 degree summers and -30 below winters. 

Our weather helps keep the Rif Raf out?

 

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Living in Missouri i wonder if a large dairy is economically feasible, 30 years ago we had a lot of dairies in our county,today i can name six.North of I-70 the land is fairly level to rolling,but the wind can be brutal in the winter. You go south of the Missouri river and it's generally more hills and creek bottoms,very pretty to look at,but probably a challenge to raise enough feed for 1000-1200 head dairy herd.Property taxes on farm ground are cheap, compared to most states, we do have a 1/8% sales tax for soil and water conservation that provides a lot of programs for controlled grazing,terraces ,water ways and manure management.

I have a friend who's family runs a 1400-1600 head dairy about 7 miles north of me, i could get you his number and he would tell you the good ,bad and ugly.

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2 minutes ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Those that come here have to be tough to put up with 100 degree summers and -30 below winters. 

Our weather helps keep the Rif Raf out?

 

I'm from Northern MN where I've seen anything from 100F to -55F.  Currently living in Grand Forks, ND (temporarily).  We saw 95 this summer and -30 last winter (before wind chill) and over 100 inches of snow.  Seen -40 many times.  It's not for the timid, but it's all I've ever known. 

When we were in Alaska for a couple of years, they were warning me about the weather.  I laughed, Anchorage has beautiful weather compared to the northern prairies.  Fairbanks or Alaska interior is a different story, but Anchorage is nice.

 

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47 minutes ago, EquipmentJunkie said:

I will let the discussion for the experts except for one point.  The H2O issue that is driving you out of WA will always be there with a dairy.  Water usage is a major factor no matter where you go.  When it comes down to it, milk is fortified water.  Don't hamper yourself in that department.  Best wishes in your search.

The new "taking" attempt is for Every type of water use.  Home owner, association, irrigation, cattle, towns, every drop of surface and well water is on the docket to be scrutinize.  The certified "were sueing you" letters from the DOE are coming early April.

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26 minutes ago, from H to 80 said:

Living in Missouri i wonder if a large dairy is economically feasible, 30 years ago we had a lot of dairies in our county,today i can name six.North of I-70 the land is fairly level to rolling,but the wind can be brutal in the winter. You go south of the Missouri river and it's generally more hills and creek bottoms,very pretty to look at,but probably a challenge to raise enough feed for 1000-1200 head dairy herd.Property taxes on farm ground are cheap, compared to most states, we do have a 1/8% sales tax for soil and water conservation that provides a lot of programs for controlled grazing,terraces ,water ways and manure management.

I have a friend who's family runs a 1400-1600 head dairy about 7 miles north of me, i could get you his number and he would tell you the good ,bad and ugly.

That would be appreciated 

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