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Electric roads in Sweden


acem

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Yes but the whole intent is to use the electric on the road. The batteries would be small compared to current electric cars. 

The big batteries currently used in cars are a bad idea. They are heavy, using energy to move around. Charging a battery uses more energy than you get back from it. By using the electricity directly from the road you save a lot of energy in numerous ways.

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If it makes sense, we won't do it.  Too much money invested and to be made by those backing the current debacle. Tho I must say I find either option highly un necessary and probably highly expensive.

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I watched it, I could actually see that perhaps in industrial applications, air ports huge industrial sites, ports perhaps, maybe even theme parks etc. but when something goes wrong with the road, you have suddenly crippled ALL of the vehicles reliant on it. Seems like huge infrastructure that is likely to wear out or become obsolete quickly. Not to mention snow, ice, rain with those “brushes” I realize these are just prototypes, but it looks shaky to me. 

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It's in the prototype development stages. Lots of changes will occur if it works out.

Here's the idea in a nutshell. The car has smaller batteries that enable you to drive around some but not make a trip. This battery would be topped off at home and possibly at work, etc. The major roads and highways would have the power strip that you connect to. This would power your vehicle on the road and possibly top the batteries off. 

Smaller batteries reduce the weight of the car allowing it to use less energy and taking less resources to build.

I don't see this working out in the country anytime soon. But remember the vast majority of people live in cities and suburbs. Driving across town for work, shopping, entertainment, kids activities, etc. They rarely leave the metro. 

If you've driven in LA or any big city during rush hour you can see how this would impact the environment.

Where's the electricity come from?

Somewhere else of course! 

The electric infrastructure must be significantly upgraded for any of this to work. I think advanced nuclear power playing a significant role. Fossil fuels will continue to be a major electric producer for a long time.

IMHO YMMV

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1 hour ago, Steve C. said:

 

Women can do anything men can do, right?

 

 

According to the news reporter the gun ban does not affect licensed concealed carriers. New mexico is a shal issue state with reciprocity with many states.

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Norway produces much of their electricity from hydro. Recently they had a negative price for electricity due to heavy rainfall filling their reservoirs. 
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/norway-free-hydro-electricity-wet-summer-climate-change-oslo/

 

Sweden is about the size of Arizona with a population of ≈10.5 million with almost 90% of them in urban or metro areas. 
Their infrastructure needs are much different than a large nation such as the US. 

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I think it makes better sense that stringing power lines above the streets for NEW haha street cars like Kansas City is doing right now, with lots of plans to exspand.

I like it Acem, maybe a solar road will follow, we have prototypes go that too, feeding the grid , why not cars. 
Im picturing a bunch of people in overalls glued their smart phone complaining about technology……

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2 hours ago, acem said:

Sweden has an unusual electric generation profile.

Did the graph says produced?  Do they purchase/import any electricity? That’s the math used for California’s success at green energy 

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9 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I watched it, I could actually see that perhaps in industrial applications, air ports huge industrial sites, ports perhaps, maybe even theme parks etc. but when something goes wrong with the road, you have suddenly crippled ALL of the vehicles reliant on it. Seems like huge infrastructure that is likely to wear out or become obsolete quickly. Not to mention snow, ice, rain with those “brushes” I realize these are just prototypes, but it looks shaky to me. 

Precisely why it would happen…

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Here's a couple articles describing difficulties with electric vehicles and charging stations. The npr article follows the us secretary of energy on a road trip with electric vehicles. They have problems...

Electric roads could solve most of these problems if they can work it out.

https://www.npr.org/2023/09/10/1187224861/electric-vehicles-evs-cars-chargers-charging-energy-secretary-jennifer-granholm

https://www.motortrend.com/reviews/2022-rivian-r1t-launch-edition-yearlong-review-update-13-towing/amp/

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