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IH M 1 on gun broker


vtfireman85

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Thing with GB is eventually someone comes along willing to pay it, you can rack up some listing fees, but it usually does sell.

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And I could have had an M1 Carbine for $50 and an M1 Garand for $100 thru the Civilian Marksman Program. 

Stoooooooooooooooooooooooooped ME!

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3 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

And I could have had an M1 Carbine for $50 and an M1 Garand for $100 thru the Civilian Marksman Program. 

Stoooooooooooooooooooooooooped ME!

And in ten or twenty years someone may say "back in 2023 I could have had an IHC M1 Garand for $4250"

I just don't see the price of good collectable rifles going down.

Too rich for my blood right now but it will make someone happy.

 

 

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5-6 years ago I priced multiple units like that for $1400-1500. Prices have appreciated, but not that much in my opinion.
Now…..if you could prove it was carried in the Korean War by a Medal of Honor recipient or some other artifact of extreme provenance that might be different but you are talking about photographic proof, letters from the family, possibly bring back papers, etc…

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When I think of the guns I did not buy it hurts!  I remember when those Bolo Chinese Mauser Broomhandles were available in 9mm for about $100 each!!  I always wanted one after seeing the Winston Churchill movie.  Seemed like a lot of money to a student in the '80's though!  Sure wish I had bought one!

Edited by Rawleigh99
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On 7/27/2023 at 7:27 AM, Diesel Doctor said:

And I could have had an M1 Carbine for $50 and an M1 Garand for $100 thru the Civilian Marksman Program. 

Stoooooooooooooooooooooooooped ME!

And an SKS for 79 bucks in the 1990's lol

 

 

I picked up an IH M1 from CMP recently for $1,450

 

 

IMG_20230718_164239637.jpg

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Before I would put down that much money for an IH I would have to take it apart or have to see more detailed pictures of the small parts of the rifle.   I don't take anyone's word that it has the "correct" parts.  This is a late manufactured IH and there was a lot of redos at IH during production, but the stock has an Overton of the date of 257th day of 1955 (2575)  with a barrel date 12-54.  Overton also made replacement stocks, so buyer beware.   This by the way this is the most common of the IH marked receivers.  There were seven different ways that IH marked their M1 receivers.  IH also contracted with SA and HRA to produce IH marked receivers.  The only real way to tell who made the receiver is by the markings on the receiver heal and the heat lot code on the lower forward right side of the receiver.  My IH is a 5.14 million and has been "corrected" with the appropriately dated IH parts and Overton 2304 marked stock.  My parts came from the "Dragon Lady" in South Dakota.  I am not sure she is even in business any more.  If you needed new old stock or like new old stock parts she was one of the go to people in about 2007 - 2008.  My LMR barrel came out of the CMP barrel take off rack.  It was 2 at both ends and beautiful inside and out.  Shoots good too.  But it resides in the back of my safe with my son's like new 5.88 million SA.

Bill

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1 hour ago, barkerwc4362 said:

Before I would put down that much money for an IH I would have to take it apart or have to see more detailed pictures of the small parts of the rifle.   I don't take anyone's word that it has the "correct" parts.  This is a late manufactured IH and there was a lot of redos at IH during production, but the stock has an Overton of the date of 257th day of 1955 (2575)  with a barrel date 12-54.  Overton also made replacement stocks, so buyer beware.   This by the way this is the most common of the IH marked receivers.  There were seven different ways that IH marked their M1 receivers.  IH also contracted with SA and HRA to produce IH marked receivers.  The only real way to tell who made the receiver is by the markings on the receiver heal and the heat lot code on the lower forward right side of the receiver.  My IH is a 5.14 million and has been "corrected" with the appropriately dated IH parts and Overton 2304 marked stock.  My parts came from the "Dragon Lady" in South Dakota.  I am not sure she is even in business any more.  If you needed new old stock or like new old stock parts she was one of the go to people in about 2007 - 2008.  My LMR barrel came out of the CMP barrel take off rack.  It was 2 at both ends and beautiful inside and out.  Shoots good too.  But it resides in the back of my safe with my son's like new 5.88 million SA.

Bill

Sounds like you and I should have a discussion about how to get mine corrected :)

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I bought mine in 2007 during one of my visits to CMP South in Anniston, Alabama.  I collected the parts over time to represent a typical production IH.  Now the parts would be A LOT more expensive and harder to find.  All the guys like me bought them for our builds.  They are out there, but you better come with a fat wallet.  First step is to get the reference works and determine if you have an early or late production rifle.  I have all the Scott Duff books on the Garand, plus a lot of info from now non existent web sites.  When CMP was selling Garands left and right there were multiple sites with active discussions on what was the right combination of parts.  Most of them are gone now.  A lot of the parts sellers are also gone.  It's just like the abundant cheap supply of  M1 Carbine parts is long gone.  I could not afford to buy the parts to build the M1 Carbines from CMP Plainfield barrelled receivers, like I did in the early 2000's.

Bill 

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From a long way back

"Ih M1 garand at Cabela's"

January 3, 2022 in General Chat

Where I added this 

"

There was this article

"The M1 Today" in "Guns 1989 Annual" which had some on "collectables".  I've scanned one page re that and hopefully attaches

Some points were

"Never buy an "all one contractor National Match rifle" - they were assembled from parts that measured up regardless of contractor

Especially an "all Winchester one" - "Winchester made M1's only during WW2 and there were no National Matches then"

"IH did not make all parts for the rifle so a weapon which carries their code everywhere is immediately bogus"

Mentions "people with WRA stamps and engraving kits"

Here is the scan (hopefully!)

2147468306_GarandCollecting.thumb.jpg.5e

 

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The National Match (NM) rifles are a world unto their own.  The original NMs were all built at Springfield Armory (SA) from new production SA rifles.  There are various versions of the NMs as SA sought to improve accuracy and repeatability.  Some NMs were refurbished/rebuilt at SA multiple times and in the process upgraded to the newest version.  Then, there are the match rifles built by the various gunsmiths.  There are books written about the process and the Army and Marines published Technical Manuals (TM), pamphlets, and brochures to support the effort.

  Bill

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