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Ash tree replacement..................


dads706

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What is everybody replacing their ash trees with? Mine finally bit the dust. Most have still got a few green branches, but talking to the area ISU horticultuist, she said I may as well cut them down now because they are dead. Just living off residual nutrients. She said they are actually infected a couple years before they ever show signs. Mine started showing signs last year. I was hoping they would survive, but not gonna happen.

Thinking about Oak, Maple, or Hackberry. Hackberry is probably the fastest growing, but I'll be dead before any are tall enough to provide shade.

(Maybe I'll just wait and the Chinese Elm and the Mulberry will just take over as volunteer)

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They don’t get enough credit but I think hackberry are a great shade tree and a good replacement for ash. I have several red oak and they grow surprisingly fast too. Also have autumn blaze maple which grows fast and have nice fall color, my only complaint with them is the shape, don’t have a wide crown like the ash.

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I have alot of hackberry. They are fast growing and make good shade. They tend to split in summer storms.

They make good firewood when green because of a lower moisture content.

I've even sawn some for lumber.

Thx-Ace 

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After having a hackberry split and come through my parents roof in the middle of winter as a kid I’d never plant one on purpose. 

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My son and I have been planting the new blight resistant  American chestnut all around the farm.  He starts them in old coffee cans and milk jugs and we plant the when they are 2ft tall.  Once the dominate tree in Appalachia and what my barns are made from

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13 minutes ago, Mr. Brookville said:

My son and I have been planting the new blight resistant  American chestnut all around the farm.  He starts them in old coffee cans and milk jugs and we plant the when they are 2ft tall.  Once the dominate tree in Appalachia and what my barns are made from

My wife’s family has a large farm in Connecticut. Several of the buildings there are chestnut. 

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34 minutes ago, Mr. Brookville said:

My son and I have been planting the new blight resistant  American chestnut all around the farm.  He starts them in old coffee cans and milk jugs and we plant the when they are 2ft tall.  Once the dominate tree in Appalachia and what my barns are made from

Do they grow quickly at all?  Any more details?  This sounds interesting. 
 

I’ve got 6, 3yr old pecan trees in 5 gallon buckets that were started from the large pecan in my yard. I know it was the same size in the 1950’s as I have pictures of it. Been struck by lightning twice in the 15 or so years I’ve lived here. I’ve lost large limbs to large storms in the past but that tree is tough. 

F91BF07D-34E4-4D9E-B0A2-8F3E06BAAD8A.jpeg

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Pin oak if near house 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Brookville said:

My son and I have been planting the new blight resistant  American chestnut all around the farm.  He starts them in old coffee cans and milk jugs and we plant the when they are 2ft tall.  Once the dominate tree in Appalachia and what my barns are made from

Sound very interesting but I think chestnut is native to the eastern US, not us here in IA.  Hickory trees are native here in IA, I've always wanted to plant 1 but have not yet.

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41 minutes ago, bitty said:

Pin oak if near house 

Our pins all have gotten wasp galls in this area.  Southern IL.   Have spent $$$ on various treatments trying to save/prolong the 50 plus year old ones.

As far as a new planting,  I wouldnt consider them an option anymore In this area.

 

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Whatever you plant, make sure it is native to your locale. 

I have a live oak in my front yard, planted as a 3 year old in 2005. It was growing great until 2 years ago then started showing trunk bark tears.  I called in our HOA ahborist (dyslectic spelling) and SHE said the -5F temperature we got in 2019 did freeze damage to many trees and it can take years to show up.

I intend to replant with a male Bo'dock or honey locust if when the oak is turned into firewood.

 

 

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Autumn blaze maple has been my choice to replace the Ash trees with. They grow fast. In 15 years, mine have become huge!  I grew up with a yard full of Linden trees, they are messy. Drop a lot of branches. Red Maples are nice too,  but are slower growing.

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4 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Do they grow quickly at all?  Any more details?  This sounds interesting. 
 

I’ve got 6, 3yr old pecan trees in 5 gallon buckets that were started from the large pecan in my yard. I know it was the same size in the 1950’s as I have pictures of it. Been struck by lightning twice in the 15 or so years I’ve lived here. I’ve lost large limbs to large storms in the past but that tree is tough. 

F91BF07D-34E4-4D9E-B0A2-8F3E06BAAD8A.jpeg

How did you start the Pecan trees? 

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35 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

How did you start the Pecan trees? 

A friend took a bag full of pecans after they dropped and thermomcycled them (probably not correct tree term) They supposedly have to go through a cold cycle like a winter before they are viable to grow. This can be done in a fridge/freezer. He planted them in an an old water tank and sent me a few that sprouted. 

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24 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

A friend took a bag full of pecans after they dropped and thermomcycled them (probably not correct tree term) They supposedly have to go through a cold cycle like a winter before they are viable to grow. This can be done in a fridge/freezer. He planted them in an an old water tank and sent me a few that sprouted. 

Thanks   I will have to try. Our Pecans are tiny but they taste great. Only have one tree though. 

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