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Sink in garage advice


Missouri Mule

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I would like to add a slop sink in my shop for washing hands and mainly to help cleanup when i make sausage. I normally clean up my shop and setup some extra tables inside. Currently i drag everything inside 200' to the kitchen for mama to clean. Anyway

All i have is a hydrant poured into concrete. For the occasional use i was thinking of installling a slop sink with a hose to the hydrant. Maybe use a quality washer hose or something. I would need warm water so i was thinking of trying a little inline 110v instant heater. Turn hydrant on, run water to remove air from the line, turn a switch on for heater mounted next to it and have some warm water to wash pots and pans and meat grinder and stuffer parts etc. When im done shut it all off and unhook the hose to drain for freeze protection. Its on an exterior wall so the drain will have to just go outside. 

Id rather not bust up my floor to dig up the yard hydrant someone installed years ago so this is my solution. Anyone have a better idea?  Im not sure how decent those little instant heaters are and i believe most are setup to shut off without water these days i realize my plan leaves room for error this way. My shop is heated with wood so it does get below freezing in there. 

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We have one of those heaters in the shop at work and it's enough for 2 people to wash their hands, no more.  They make an LP powered unit that runs off a 20lb grill cylinder that would do what you want. Also, sinks out there with a built in sump and pump. Search "portable gas camp heater"  or "portable pet wash heater".  This is also an interesting idea, but depending on what the ground water temp is there, you may not get enough temp rise.  https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-HotWave-Multi-Purpose-Hose-Sprayer-120-Volt-Heated-Water-Nozzle-HTW018120/323699856?source=shoppingads&locale=en-US&&mtc=SHOPPING-RM-RMP-GGL-D26P-026_010_WATER_HEATER-SB-RHEEM-NA-SMART-NA-NA-MK680422200-NA-NBR-2529-CON-NA-FY23_2529Feed&cm_mmc=SHOPPING-RM-RMP-GGL-D26P-026_010_WATER_HEATER-SB-RHEEM-NA-SMART-NA-NA-MK680422200-NA-NBR-2529-CON-NA-FY23_2529Feed-71700000084558371-58700007181517082-92700073320334949&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI556O496f_gIVAZpbCh0ZHwpcEAQYAiABEgIwPvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

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This is mine. I think it is 2 gallon, runs on 110. 15 years old, no problems. Would be simple to plumb off the hydrant and to the sink.

IMG_20230410_120716492.jpg

IMG_20230410_120723189.jpg

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35 minutes ago, cobfly said:

This is mine. I think it is 2 gallon, runs on 110. 15 years old, no problems. Would be simple to plumb off the hydrant and to the sink.

IMG_20230410_120716492.jpg

IMG_20230410_120723189.jpg

So is that still considered instant?? Guess not if it holds 2 gallon. But yes that would work. 

What i SHOULD do is plumb water into the shop from my boiler which sets 10' from the corner of my shop. Install a heater loop for inside and a plate exchanger for hot water also in the same loop. I currently have a hot blast forced air wood burner in there and never minded throwing a few sticks in. I always just grab a shovel load of coals out of my boiler and walk 30' to my stove inside, throw a few sticks on top and have a hot fire within 30 minutes. It takes it about an hour or so to get it to tee shirt temps. The main reason i havent is when it gets down super cold my boiler works pretty hard for my old house. Even if i left my shop at 50* it would probably be alot to ask. Temps over 20* outside and it would handle it all fine. I guess i never felt it was worth the hassle/money. 

If my hydrant ever goes bad ill probably bust up a 2' square, and go back with water line. I could build extra insulation box around it or put a heat trace on it. 

I know if i can makeshift something in there my wife would sure like helping me make sausage more. Maybe ill start a new thread and share some pictures. 

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6 hours ago, Missouri Mule said:

I would like to add a slop sink in my shop for washing hands and mainly to help cleanup when i make sausage. I normally clean up my shop and setup some extra tables inside. Currently i drag everything inside 200' to the kitchen for mama to clean. Anyway

All i have is a hydrant poured into concrete. For the occasional use i was thinking of installling a slop sink with a hose to the hydrant. Maybe use a quality washer hose or something. I would need warm water so i was thinking of trying a little inline 110v instant heater. Turn hydrant on, run water to remove air from the line, turn a switch on for heater mounted next to it and have some warm water to wash pots and pans and meat grinder and stuffer parts etc. When im done shut it all off and unhook the hose to drain for freeze protection. Its on an exterior wall so the drain will have to just go outside. 

Id rather not bust up my floor to dig up the yard hydrant someone installed years ago so this is my solution. Anyone have a better idea?  Im not sure how decent those little instant heaters are and i believe most are setup to shut off without water these days i realize my plan leaves room for error this way. My shop is heated with wood so it does get below freezing in there. 

Dad did the same thing but just used a small 110 water heater. If your shop is heated all the time it works good. Wire the water heater with a heavy on off switch at light switch level so you jut it off when hydrant is off. Suprising what hot water in the shop helps for cleaning stuff.

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There’s as many ways to do it as there are people to ask.  I recently did this for the guy down the street 

2E135D57-83A7-4681-B2B2-A2F508A0457E.thumb.jpeg.301b3c66bac67e2c3ea59db5351ba8c5.jpeg
 

small sink, several hundred gallon tank he pulls the hose to when he needs it,  small pump and 6 gallon heater.  Always ready to use, uses one 20 amp outlet

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2 hours ago, AKwelder said:

There’s as many ways to do it as there are people to ask.  I recently did this for the guy down the street 

2E135D57-83A7-4681-B2B2-A2F508A0457E.thumb.jpeg.301b3c66bac67e2c3ea59db5351ba8c5.jpeg
 

small sink, several hundred gallon tank he pulls the hose to when he needs it,  small pump and 6 gallon heater.  Always ready to use, uses one 20 amp outlet

That is top notch work. The only thing I would worry about is algae in the water if it sits to long.

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

That is top notch work. The only thing I would worry about is algae in the water if it sits to long.

Thank you.  I think a small dose of chlorine is needed to keep everything going.  Each there own

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I did the single point of load instant on water heater and plastic big sink approach in the shop in 2014 or so.  The water heater does ok, but there’s only like 50F difference that it can achieve (the model I got was a Rheem brand). Fine for Bama but might be different in winter in Wisconsin or such.  I put the same home depot  or lowes biggest plastic sink in the house and the shop; with dog washing and parts washing in mind.  There a bottle of Natures Miracle skunk soap next to each.  Been a while since needed.  Dolly’s too old to chase a skunk now.  I fished around about a used stainless steel commercial sink at the time.  If that had been affordable, it’d have been better, I’m sure.  These have worked out, but steel would have been better for nasty parts cleaning and no staining, probably.   I hear there’s a maintenance involved with instant on water heaters, and I don’t know what that is.  Mine’s just worked fine for 9yrs.  I started to do instant on for the house, but electricians warned me off, saying the whole house models that need to supply 3 points of use at a time would pull more than a welder on current.  It was like 60A on 220V or something.  So I went tank heater again in the house.  Not my area of expertise, and I’m just relating what I was told.  I’m in a rural area without natural gas.  Could do LP of course.  A coworker has LP instant on and put a battery backed uninterruptible power supply (UPS) on the control system and boasts of hot showers during power outages.  Infrequent advantage, but is better.  For the shop, the Rheem has done well.  

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You can start at the hydrant with PEX. It's likely plenty flexible enough to move out of the way for other uses. Run it to the sink and a point of use tankless electric. They are available in different capacities. The smaller ones will only heat maybe 1-1.5 gpm. Great for a sink. I would think you will want more. Find something in the 9kw range. It would run on a welder circuit. Also put a T and a hose bib at the hydrant so you can still get water there. 

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Thanks guys. This confirms what i was thinking about the instant heater. I assumed it was ok to wash hands. Might even be ok with a sink and spray wand. One concern is i am on a well and im guessing here but during the winter water temps are 40* +/-    so a 50* differential would be 90*  great for hands but not for washing raw meat off pans and parts. So bigger we will have to go. 

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There are two types. One thermostaticly controlled the other is just on or off. The thermostat type is better suited to variable flow as it can modulate the input power to meet the flow demands. Ideally suited to more than one sink or a small home. The other type is better suited to a constant flow, like one sink. For what you want to do the on off type will be fine. The 50 degree rise is just a rating standard.  So much gallons with so much temp rise. The 50 degree rise is just to make the unit seem bigger. It's not a very useful number in most areas where water temperatures are below 60. If you want more rise you will have less flow on any heater. You control the water temperature with the non-thermostaticly controlled heater with the flow. We normally install a flow restrictor in the line so you don't try to send too much water through them resulting in little temp rise. You probably want 2-3gpm with 80 degree rise. Not sure how big the heater would need to be but any manufacturer should have charts that can tell you what their heater will do. 

Supplyhouse.com lists a Bosch 12kw Tronic 3000c for $206. It has a 1.2gpm rating at 70 degree rise. 50 amp circuit. You may want more flow but not sure how much you want to spend or how much power you have available. I have installed a couple of units that require 3-50amp circuits. That's a lot of power to heat water. 

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I have used a on/off electric water heater for s sink for many years. I'm currently on my third one. The rise/gallons thing is anb issue that I work around with a ball valve to adjust the output flow. Full on in the warm weather reduce flow to maintain temp when cold. You may find a gas or fuel oil better suits your needs. 

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