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Garden 2023


barkerwc4362

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1 hour ago, yellowrosefarm said:

The thing is, there are about 500 acres of corn all around that place. It's not like they really need my 3 rows of sweet corn to survive. 

I've been growing field corn for several years, and the coons won't bother it. Years ago, I'd put a few rows of sweet corn along the edge of the corn patch and as soon as it was ripe the coons would destroy it and not touch the field corn. Don't understand it, but that's how they are. Try some sardines in your trap, or even better, mini marshmallows and chocolate syrup. They can't resist!

Mac

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3 hours ago, MacAR said:

I've been growing field corn for several years, and the coons won't bother it. Years ago, I'd put a few rows of sweet corn along the edge of the corn patch and as soon as it was ripe the coons would destroy it and not touch the field corn. Don't understand it, but that's how they are. Try some sardines in your trap, or even better, mini marshmallows and chocolate syrup. They can't resist!

Mac

The recipe I got off youtube is what finally got Mrs. Houdini. Cherry kool aid powder, vanilla extract, flour, baking soda , marshmallows and water.  All the canned meats, chicken bones, fruits, etc, she managed to get out of the cage without getting caught. I had even wired 2 chicken bones to dangle in the back and she pulled the wire up and unwrapped it. She could spring a hav a heart and not get caught. The Z trap did the trick once I put some boards in to narrow it up inside.

https://www.ztraps.net/shop/ztrap/2 

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I dug my carrots yesterday. Didn’t think to get any pictures but really wouldn’t want to show you the garden right now anyway, grass has come in to some parts and I haven’t had time to keep it clean. Peeled, sliced, blanched, and froze the carrots. Not looking forward to winter but I am looking forward to eating them in beef stew, vegetable beef soup, and potato soup this winter.

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The 'big' tomatoes are finally hitting there stride. Been getting early girls and a 'big' one here and there for over a month but all of a sudden have 'big' ones in spades! I say 'big' ones because I can't remember what seed I planted back in February. They came from Burpee but don't remember what they were called. All I can tell you is, they are plenty big!!!

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12 hours ago, DT Fan said:

The 'big' tomatoes are finally hitting there stride. Been getting early girls and a 'big' one here and there for over a month but all of a sudden have 'big' ones in spades! I say 'big' ones because I can't remember what seed I planted back in February. They came from Burpee but don't remember what they were called. All I can tell you is, they are plenty big!!!

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My tomato plants are not my best this year.  Haven't looked great all year, some almost look like herbicide drift but I really don't think that's the issue as other things so no sign of that.  Maybe it's just the dry weather.  My grape tomatoes have had lots of ripe tomatoes for some time but agree the larger ones have been slow to ripen.  Hopefully they will come on soon.

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54 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

My tomato plants are not my best this year.  Haven't looked great all year, some almost look like herbicide drift but I really don't think that's the issue as other things so no sign of that.  Maybe it's just the dry weather.  My grape tomatoes have had lots of ripe tomatoes for some time but agree the larger ones have been slow to ripen.  Hopefully they will come on soon.

Probably the heat last week gave them a kick in the rear-end!

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Mowed the sweetcorn today, always a good feeling when that happens. Also took a couple pics of the vine y stuff. There is only two hills of watermelon there!  Probably the best crop of them I've ever raised. Cucumbers are doing well too.

Edit; If any of you guys in the area want a watermelon, give me a shout. Don't know what I going to do with all of them.

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The zipper peas are finally filling out the rows and starting to bloom.1

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Won't be long before I will have to start picking.  My wife and her sister will shell them.  These are not allowed to dry before they are picked and shelled.  They are blanched and then frozen.  I am fighting aphids on one end of the patch.  Our cat you can see is making sure everything is safe.

The okra will be a while longer before it starts to bloom.

Bill

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well I picked a few peas last Monday before we went to the beach.  We got back Friday and I picked Saturday morning.  There were 6 gallons of pods.

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Libby shelled the peas while we were watching Alabama football.  This is how many peas came out of those 6 gallon of pods.

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Libby said there were some pinkeye peas mixed in with the zippers.  So the seed I got from the local COOP had some pinkeye seeds mixed with the zipper seed.  She blanched them so they can be frozen.  The result is 6 quarts of peas in the freezer.

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I will pick again on Wednesday.  Libby wants 12 - 14 quarts for the freezer.

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Well I picked peas again this morning.  Got 8 - 9 gallons of pods.

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Libby has already started shelling them.  She said purple hulls will turn your hands purple if you shell them by hand.  These are off of 5 rows that are about 80 - 85 feet long.  They are planted late because I plant them after the sweet corn is gone.  I don't have enough space to plant then earlier.  But planting them later is a blessing.  It's not as hot when I go to pick them and I don't have the bug problems that most people have with the earlier crop.  When I planted some field peas at a garden spot I had about 1/2 mile up the road it was a fight to keep the bugs out of the peas.  Of course there was also peanut and cotton fields on all sides of the spot.  There are no fields close to us here.

I planted some squash and cucumbers for the fall garden.  I also set out bell pepper plants and 12 broccoli plants.   I will probably get some cabbage plants next week and set them out.  I will plant some english peas and snow peas in a couple of weeks.  That will do it for gardening this year.  I should have broccoli and cabbage about Thanksgiving and english and snow peas about the same time.

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Well the latest batch of pods made 8 quarts.

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So that makes 15 quarts in the freezer.  We aren't done yet!  Probably have two more pickings.  Libby said a quart of shelled peas at the farmer's market is bringing about $9.00.  There just aren't as many people growing peas theses days.  Lots of work and labor costs are up. 

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They are called field peas.  There must be a dozen different varieties.   Some can be shelled green like we do and others are allowed to dry like black eyed peas.   There are cooked by boiling normally with a slice of bacon until tender.  You will see them called cream peas sometimes.  I was not raised in the South, but my wife is a die hard eater of Southern foods.  They also take field corn (they call it yellow dent) and cream it.  In my opinion it can't hold a candle to creamed sweet corn, but sweet corn here was a luxury during the depression and everyone grew corn to either feed the livestock or have ground into meal.   They fry corn bread down here.   Corn meal is mixed with water to a thin almost paste and then fried.

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Well Friday morning I picked another 6 gallons of pods.  Libby shelled and blanched them yesterday.  So we have put up 30 quarts of peas this year so far with another picking due on Tuesday or Wednesday.  But with the cost of shelled peas at the farmer's market of around $9 a quart it's worth it for as many peas as we eat.

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I snapped this shot of my little pumpkin and turnip patch a couple days ago:

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The rest of the garden is done, the apples are all picked, and I finished hanging the last little bit of my tobacco yesterday. I only have the wife's little cotton patch to pick through now, and about 4 pepper plants that are still going. If it will ever rain, I'll get everything plowed back in and ready for next season. 

Mac

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I have a question that's not gardening exactly, but about pear trees. Pretty much every old homestead around here had/has one or more old pear trees, including mine. The pears are plentiful every other year or so but I can't figure out why they were so prized back in the day. They take a really long time to ripen to the point of softness and then spoil quickly. My sister tried making some preserves, which were OK, but not great. My wife has put them in with apples in a pie, but they were kind of tough. I've eaten them raw, but only because there wasn't anything else close by. What am I missing about these things?

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3 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

I have a question that's not gardening exactly, but about pear trees. Pretty much every old homestead around here had/has one or more old pear trees, including mine. The pears are plentiful every other year or so but I can't figure out why they were so prized back in the day. They take a really long time to ripen to the point of softness and then spoil quickly. My sister tried making some preserves, which were OK, but not great. My wife has put them in with apples in a pie, but they were kind of tough. I've eaten them raw, but only because there wasn't anything else close by. What am I missing about these things?

  My guess is that pears are a little more reliable in the north versus cherries, apples, and most other fruit trees.  It mattered more back in the days when a family had to live off of the land versus going to the store.  Pears are pretty good chilled and bowled in their own juice.

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 pears don't need spray like apple trees.- worms! 

the orchard closeby starts spraying in April. 

canned pears are good and my wife makes an excellent pear pie. My sister used to make pear juice which is also very good.

they don't store well so thats the drawback  

 

there is lots of apple orchards up here. Family farms had apples and orchards. I know of a few old timers who refer to a field with no trees as the orchard. thats where it used to be 😁

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