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100 Bushel soybeans


lorenzo

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Since the 300 bushel corn was such a shock. Heres what our Pioneer Dealer gave us, along with a whole bunch of other perks and gifts. And before you say BS. were not the only ones in the area that got these.

BCA8B79D-D5FB-41F5-B32B-6E4ADE5950B1.thumb.jpeg.8bde5376987eed030f2ae8f1fd6c72f2.jpeg

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6 minutes ago, lorenzo said:

Since the 300 bushel corn was such a shock. Heres what our Pioneer Dealer gave us, along with a whole bunch of other perks and gifts. And before you say BS. were not the only ones in the area that got these.

BCA8B79D-D5FB-41F5-B32B-6E4ADE5950B1.thumb.jpeg.8bde5376987eed030f2ae8f1fd6c72f2.jpeg

Your 8920 got the ball rolling, no doubt. Congrats! ūüŹÜ¬†

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I don’t doubt it. I have heard rumors of 90 and 100 bu bean around here, although it would be rare. In most cases I think those yields are associated with a crop rotation that was heavy on corn and also heavy on manure application.  I see the bean stover yields directly and last year was a good year for bean stover tonnage. This particular field was a record breaker in my observations. 275 large rounds on an outside 80 with a farm place in it, so probably more like 70 tillable acres. 

097DC8B2-0454-4C77-9742-8FA9EC07DFA1.jpeg

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  There are probably 15-20 acres where I could run 100 bushels per acre of soybeans.  Then there are 15-20 acres where 15 bushels per acre of soybeans is a good honest yield in an average year.  

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1 hour ago, Gearclash said:

I don’t doubt it. I have heard rumors of 90 and 100 bu bean around here, although it would be rare. In most cases I think those yields are associated with a crop rotation that was heavy on corn and also heavy on manure application.  I see the bean stover yields directly and last year was a good year for bean stover tonnage. This particular field was a record breaker in my observations. 275 large rounds on an outside 80 with a farm place in it, so probably more like 70 tillable acres. 

097DC8B2-0454-4C77-9742-8FA9EC07DFA1.jpeg

Your exactly right, corn rotation and lots of cow poop.

Our 2022 sign hasent arrived yet.

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4 hours ago, lorenzo said:

Since the 300 bushel corn was such a shock. Heres what our Pioneer Dealer gave us, along with a whole bunch of other perks and gifts. And before you say BS. were not the only ones in the area that got these.

BCA8B79D-D5FB-41F5-B32B-6E4ADE5950B1.thumb.jpeg.8bde5376987eed030f2ae8f1fd6c72f2.jpeg

Never a naysayer on yields anymore. 32 years ago 1990 was probably best avg dad had on wheat in a long time. 1000 acres avg 30 or 31 boa. I swathed it all that year and the straw was spectacular. Just heads were not filled well. Bit at that time 30 on wheat was really good. Fast forward to now and the fertilizer , herbicide and just understanding what it takes to raise a crop and that years stand only running 30 would be a disaster. If we farm another 20 years I hope to have at least a 80 acre field avg 100. We are really far north to seed long season corn or soybeans to push the envelope up here but they talk in a few years of having 500 bushel corn

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2 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

Are they dryland beans or under a pivot? 

Lol.  Irrigated with a pivot.  
 

100 bushel dry land beans is just a dream  in my area.   Guys were lucky to get 30 where they had some rain.

I herd of an area where guys were only getting 10 about 35 miles west of me.

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1 hour ago, lorenzo said:

Lol.  Irrigated with a pivot.  
 

100 bushel dry land beans is just a dream  in my area.   Guys were lucky to get 30 where they had some rain.

I herd of an area where guys were only getting 10 about 35 miles west of me.

If you can control the amount of water you put on what do you worry about?

pretty much from may until harvest im fully consumed with hope and prayer for rain

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A few guys tried growing soybeans out here in SE Colo in the late 90's and early 2000's. We are too hot and they did not do well at all. They got the nickname of "Baked Beans" 

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That's a heck of a yield Lorenzo, last year I had some do 83 and my brother had some at 90 but his were sprayed twice with fungicide.  This year the irrigated beans were off 5 to 8 bushels from last year, my brother and I treated them the same as the year before and mine were better than his. Soybeans are a fickle mistress- too much rain, not enough rain, too hot at the wrong time, too cool at the wrong time, too much stress, not enough stress. Bugs,disease and let's not forget about chemical drift.

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Best ever was 93 in 2021, 2022 were good but not 93. Had never combined beans that good! We are in non irrigated country, normally have plenty rain. The last two years were terrible dry, but some of the best crops we ever grew.

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50-60 bushel is still considered a success here. The only pivots here are in the river bottom. Much of that bottom is just too sandy to grow fantastic crops. 75+ is doable on some ground here, but it is totally dependent on the weather. Soybean yields here have not really changed that much in the last 30 years. They are maybe more consistent, but a good crop here 30 years ago isn’t much different than a good crop now. 

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7 hours ago, dale560 said:

Never a naysayer on yields anymore. 32 years ago 1990 was probably best avg dad had on wheat in a long time. 1000 acres avg 30 or 31 boa. I swathed it all that year and the straw was spectacular. Just heads were not filled well. Bit at that time 30 on wheat was really good. Fast forward to now and the fertilizer , herbicide and just understanding what it takes to raise a crop and that years stand only running 30 would be a disaster. If we farm another 20 years I hope to have at least a 80 acre field avg 100. We are really far north to seed long season corn or soybeans to push the envelope up here but they talk in a few years of having 500 bushel corn

From the beginning of time up through the 80s, 20-25 bpa wheat was a good crop here on fallow.  Since the early 90s we have almost essentially doubled yields around here.  And half the time can cut a crop on continuous cropland that yields as much what grandpa used to cut on fallow.  Like you said fertilizer helped a lot and different farming practices like starting seeding early, not waiting until May and no till.  But IMO what has really helped is wheat/barley breading and these newer varieties.  Back in 2004 years, we did some some trials growing three current varieties of wheat of the time and then an old variety called Fortuna that we grew in the 70s and 80s.  We wanted to see what fertilizer and no-till would do to Fortuna since back when we grew it, we never did those things like we were doing at the current time.  Long story short, Fortuna still got its ass kicked by 10 bushel per acre compared to the newer varieties we were growing.  And since 2004, we have varieties that make those back then look lame. 

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14 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

From the beginning of time up through the 80s, 20-25 bpa wheat was a good crop here on fallow.  Since the early 90s we have almost essentially doubled yields around here.  And half the time can cut a crop on continuous cropland that yields as much what grandpa used to cut on fallow.  Like you said fertilizer helped a lot and different farming practices like starting seeding early, not waiting until May and no till.  But IMO what has really helped is wheat/barley breading and these newer varieties.  Back in 2004 years, we did some some trials growing three current varieties of wheat of the time and then an old variety called Fortuna that we grew in the 70s and 80s.  We wanted to see what fertilizer and no-till would do to Fortuna since back when we grew it, we never did those things like we were doing at the current time.  Long story short, Fortuna still got its ass kicked by 10 bushel per acre compared to the newer varieties we were growing.  And since 2004, we have varieties that make those look back then look lame. 

Yes variety does a lot. That is one of the keys to success find a variety that works for you but don’t get hung up on it change all the time. The ag college here did a trial of all the old popular varieties. Picked a common one out of the seed bank for each decade back to the pioneer days. They did a three trial, no fungicide, one with moderate agronomy ( common practice used on most farms) and a full on intensive trial. The trials all were about 10 bushels between the three practices and suprising some of those old varieties would hit 40 to 55 bpa while the most modern will hit in the high almost 100 bpa avg.

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Sure is fun while the trill lasts to get a super yield you did not expect. We always think in tons out here in the far west. I had 17 acres make 53 tons of barley, non irrigated on a rock pile more cliff than hillside. Converted to bushels/ acre 130 bu/ ac. No idea what took it from the 30-40 bushels that is average to over 100. 

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Are those yields on a certain plot size or whole field averages? 

Had some dry land beans last year running in the 60's then get to the end of the field where the deer thought they needed to graze all summer and watch them drop to about 15!

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My target goal is 70 bpa average for my organic soybeans. I don't have irrigation. Im improving every year and have been growing and saving the same soybeans for 25+ years. 

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9 hours ago, superih said:

Are those yields on a certain plot size or whole field averages? 

Had some dry land beans last year running in the 60's then get to the end of the field where the deer thought they needed to graze all summer and watch them drop to about 15!

I bet in reality you made more money on those 60 bpa dry land beans then any irrigated 100 bpa beans.  Last year the way fuel cost were we figured it cost about $1400 dollars each revolution of the pivot. 

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I would love to have a yield monitor in the 1460! Last field I cut in '22 had spots that might have made 100 BPA, sadly, they weren't real big! Hillsides in that field, that were rather big, might have made 10 or 15. That one field killed the average for the whole farm.

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