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MacGyver It


jeeper61

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My daughter and a few of her college girlfriends wanted to visit some friends in Oklahoma once when they had a few days off classes and asked if they could drive my wives explorer since hers was in my garage awaiting repair. We agreed and off they went.  Since they all had exams the coming Monday they were to head home on a Saturday morning. Saturday afternoon comes and I get a call "Dad the radiator has a bad leak". Saturday afternoon and no shops are open and no radiators are available and the whole front end pretty much needed to come off to replace a radiator.

A broken down vehicle 600 miles away and they need to be back, not an ideal situation. Now younger brother and a friend who were both auto tech students at the time were more than willing to rescue big sister and a bunch of college girls. They left that afternoon, drove thru the night and got there the next morning thinking if all else failed the girls could drive their rig back and they would drive the explorer back when they got it fixed. After looking at the leaky radiator they could see the plastic tank was loose on the core. After clamping a couple vice grips on the tank and filling with water they told the girls to drive and they would follow with extra water. They did not have to add any water all the way home and they all made it back in time. Took the vice grips off and crimped the radiator a few more times and it never did leak again!!

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Had an couple uncles and one of there friends used to tell the story of the being out racoon hunting one night when a fuse blew out in his old truck. One uncle grabbed a 22 shell and in the dark was trying to use it for a fuse when it went off. An experience none of them ever forgot!!

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An example of the difference between ultra-reliable vehicles and less reliable but fixable vehicles -

In the 1980's I met a bloke who had been on land surveys in Somalia - back when it was somewhat less dangerous than now.

Their field vehicles were a Toyota Landcruiser and the "all over Africa" Landrover.  Which had well known faults which were field fixable and you carried spares.

The Toyota was more reliable until the day it wasn't and, as he said, "The bloody thing nearly killed us".  I didn't ask how.

And a sign of the times - Landcruiser is acceptable to this spell check, Landrover is unknown 

 

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I broke an engine mount on my Scout while trail riding in TN one year. Every time I gave it fuel the fan would get into the shroud. Borrowed a dog leash, wrapped it around the engine mount, ran winch cable under the front bumper and put downforce on the engine to finish the trail ride. 

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We were in Nairobi, Kenya for a few days so we found a cheap National Park tour and set out in an ancient Land Rover. You can actually see the skyscrapers of the capital from the park. Anyway about an hour in the old Rover just stopped. We'd just passed a big rhino that wasn't pleased with our presence but gave it up when we kept driving.  The guide had no clue so I took a look and saw the wires to the diesel shut-off solenoid had broken. I asked the guide if he had a knife so I could strip and twist the broken wires and he came up with a machete, a little too much knife. I'd seen a broken mirror on the floor in the back and asked the other guy to get me a piece which did the job brilliantly.

He called me MacGyver for the rest of the trip.

Flying in Africa can be a PITA but he safaris I've been on were worth it.

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My buddy built his own shovelhead rigid from scratch in the 90's really a nice little barhopper styled. Decide one year to go visit our buddy about 4 hours away, it had been a great ride and we were about a 1/2 hour from our destination when his bike suddenly died. We quickly determined that he had no spark and the rubbing block had broke on the points, no problem put your spare points in at which he looks up and says I don't have a spare 🙄 i said ok ill go get our buddy and well come back with his pickup. I get Oneil and we are in the truck about 4 miles out of town headed to get him and he goes flying by in the oncoming lane, O'Neil says I thought he was broke down...after i left while he was waiting he spied hay bales in the field so he cut a piece of plastic twine off wrapped it around the points and melted it with a lighter into a blob rubbing block that he felt was the correct gap, ran like a scalded ape briefly, the plastic wore quick but it did what it needed to, I think Chev 6 cyl points was the part that crossed to at Napa the next day

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After WWII dad went to college in Las cruces New Mexico on the gi bill. Spending most of his money on booze and broads he was broke most of the time. He bought a model A that had been rolled and cut the top off with an axe. After a while it developed a serious knock. 

He practically gave it away to some poor Mexican who removed the oil pan and installed a piece of leather belt for a bearing. The guy drove it for years by replacing the belt every so often.

Obviously Y'all ain't looking at her the way I do...

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ive macgyvered so much stuff over the years i dont even want to admit them, but zip ties, baling wire, baling twine, wires, duct tape, electrical tape, corks, pvc, sticks, gum, breadsack, superglue, various rubber hoses, tin cans of various brands of food/beverages, aluminum foil ( not bullets ), rocks, various chunks of metal, so many bandaids over the years and some worked better than others. so may be still in use but i will never tell!!!

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Neighbor bought a $500 pos camper that had been sitting for a long time. He hit it with jumper cables. Aired up the tires at the first gas station and pointed it toward home. Three hours away.   Oil filter ruptured on the way home (rusted through!).  He cut the top off a soda can, Slid it over the rust, and lightly “clamped” it into place, with a piece of stiff wire. Possibly coat hanger 

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If you've never used a screwdriver or a crescent wrench for a hitchpin, are you really farming? 🤣

In my youth, I had an old 1/2 ton GMC truck with a 5 speed. One day, my clutch bracket broke (at the bank drive-through no less). Had to float the gears to get it out of there. Pulled into an un-used parking lot, and found a broke axe handle and some baling wire in the toolbox. Whittled the axe handle down so it'd fit on the rod that actuated the master cylinder, took the pedal off, wired it all together, and went home. Probably the only GMC truck to ever have a hand-clutch, but it worked!

Mac

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11 hours ago, MacAR said:

If you've never used a screwdriver or a crescent wrench for a hitchpin, are you really farming? 🤣

We have a small trailer that we pull behind the UTV and four wheelers on the farm. The hitch pin is an old intake valve from Lord knows what. Has a nice big head up top and the groove for the retainer holds the hairpin in place at the bottom.

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Cracked a valve stem on a wagon gear coming home with a load of water for the cistern.   No spare.   Jacked it up, super glued the stem back together,  waited 5 min, aired up and drove home the rest of the way.   Used that running gear for quite a while on that Superglued stem!

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5 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

That is when you use a 12 ga cartridge (complete with shot) to try to start your Field Marshall tractor

You really need to know a lot about tractors to understand that one, nice.

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BDB117A8-CA8D-4751-BB02-77390BBDBC7D.thumb.jpeg.f47d2b52150ff6716e1f9adc306d260a.jpegit’s not a very good picture, best I could do but this is a picture of throttle linkage on pump in my skid steer, ball joint wore out and fell apart while doing chores. Bent a chain link and put washers and a nut on rod and then used sickle section bolt and nuts to tie the link to the throttle arm, that’s been about 3 or 4 years ago, got a new joint but keep forgetting to change it when it’s in the shop. Sometimes it’s kinda fun to figure out how to get out of a jam.

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One of my relatives used blank checks right out of the check book as main and rod bearings to build oil pressure for his old massy 35 tractor. Tractor dealer gave him a good trade in on a different tractor, mostly because it sounded so good and the oil pressure was good. Nice oil pressure and no knocking at the dealership.  Only trouble is the dealer quickly sold it to one of his neighbors and the first day at work it developed knocks and the dealer was stuck with a warrantee repair job.

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