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Putting I beam in concrete floor.


twood1954
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I am in the process starting shop build after first of the year if everything goes as planned.  I wonder if anyone has set a couple length of I-beams in concrete floor as point to tie to straight things.  When I was kid the old black smith had beams in floor and would weld fasten hooks to it and uses jack to bend things.  Just looking for suggestion and maybe pictures.  Thanks in advance for help. 

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I had always considered setting some railroad rail in a new build to keep dozer grousers just above the surrounding concrete, spaced at appropriate distance, could be adapted to serve other purposes 

Seen guys install anchored pull pots at certain locations that could be handy for certain jobs

That recent video of the eastern block truck frame straightening had an interesting floor 

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The shop I work in has steel I beams cast into the floor. It keeps the grousers on tracked stuff from marking up the concrete.

 It has also served many times as a pull point for jacking bent stuff back into position.

 The beams are connected in a grid pattern and also serve as a ground point for welding.

 The whole building frame is I beams, so I only need one welding lead.

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8 hours ago, twood1954 said:

I am in the process starting shop build after first of the year if everything goes as planned.  I wonder if anyone has set a couple length of I-beams in concrete floor as point to tie to straight things.  When I was kid the old black smith had beams in floor and would weld fasten hooks to it and uses jack to bend things.  Just looking for suggestion and maybe pictures.  Thanks in advance for help. 

i’ve seen people have large D rings poured into concrete to run chains to and pull things

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I put a 6' beam, 4' in the ground in the middle of the shop under the workbench for a couple of reasons. 1, to stop an out of control something from going through the back wall, and 2, as a pull post.  In the front near the door, I put a 2"x8' piece of rebar in a pocket under a plate. That hasn't been all that useful for me, being only one. I should have done at least 2.

 

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My father put up a corn barn years ago that was designed to dump corn in but everytime that happens the put up another bin and use it for equipment storage. The side walls have cables that run side to side and the back wall has anchor points in the floor(D-rings recessed in the cement) that get cables to support the back wall. I used them once to bend a demolition derby car and I think my dad or brother used them once for something but that’s it in 15-18 years.  
On an other note, I know of a shop nearby that had metal shavings mixed in the cement for strength years ago. They said when it was new they could use the floor as ground for welding! Just lay the ground within 15 feet and there was enough metal to make the connection 

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One thing about embedding a beam in a concrete floor that would give me long pause for thought -- it will be a break-on-the-dotted-line situation.  I would bet money the floor will crack in line with that beam.  As such, if you do go that way, I would preplan how to cut control cracks to, well, control the cracking around the beam.  Without control cuts, I would expect crack(s) to radiate out from the beam ends.

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Place I used yo work at had something like that. There were dozens of anchor points on the floor. All had 1” NC threads. Floor was ground to give a smooth surface. I have no idea how the threaded receptacles were anchored but they were incredibly strong. We used them for holding and straightening heavy fabrication. Never pulled one out and never cracked the floor. They were really useful. 

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