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International hydro 100 turning over hard and wont start


Stickman4004
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My hydro 100 was starting fine and the next day it is acting like it has a dead battery. The starter will click and then turn the engine over maybe once and then the solenoid terminal going into the starter will get hot. I charged the batteries with no luck and then got new batteries with no change. Then I cleaned all the terminals, connections and ground. I cleaned the nuts and posts on the solenoid. There is 13 volts at the starter. The starter will click and engage but will only turn the engine over once and slowly at that. I checked that its in neutral, clutch in; the hydraulic levers are disengaged and I made sure that the engine turned with a wrench on the fan pulley (it seemed fine as best i could tell). Im going to try all new battery wires next. What else should I do next. 

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If you hook a jumper cable to the starter terminal, the starter won't engage but should spin really good, if not, time to remove it and rebuild or replace. Can also jump between small solenoid terminal and large solenoid terminal and it should crank over, but beware, make sure transmission is in neutral, hydro in neutral and foot n inch pedal depressed

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Also, have you checked the oil level in the engine. Just wondering, maybe you have a fuel lock, injector leaking fuel on top of piston, could also be antifreeze leak and have liquid lock on top of piston. Just coming up with suggestions trying to help you out.  Good luck

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Think I would pull the starter. Hot terminal indicates high resistance or excessive starter draw. Had the starter on the combine start just fine and the next time all it did was click. However you could also see the battery cables jump when trying to start it. Different starter solved the problem. Since you say it is the solenoid terminal going into the starter it is also a good possibility that the contacts inside the solenoid are burnt. Usually the first one to go is the battery terminal. If the terminals have not been turned you can turn them 180 degrees and get more life out of the solenoid as a rule. If you have never had the cap off a solenoid you need to take remove the starter and switch terminal nuts so you can push them into the cap as you pull it free as they have wires attached. The battery and the ignition bypass terminals will be OK as they do not have any wires attached to them.

 

If you have a voltmeter you could also see what the voltage is doing when you try to start it. An amp meter for measuring amp draw would also be helpful, not many people have that though.

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Although this doesn’t relate directly to your problem it may be if help to you or others in the future.  I have a three cylinder Perkins generator that cranked slowly.  It would always start but starter always seemed lazy. 
gave the starter an overhaul machined the commutator new brushes and bushes. Better but not much. 
as it worked I used it like this for a few years. At the weekend I decided to have another look. Everything was fine inside. But i

fid notice there were no locating dowels or notches for the starter body and endplate that carries the brushes. I reassembled it. Put it back on the engine and tried it. Slightly better. I loosened the endplate to body bolts and rotated the end plate slightly relative to the body. Tightened the bolts. Totally transformed it. Cranks really fast now and starts instantly. 
most starters are dowelled in some way and I usually make marks across the parts to realign them but it looks like the original alignment was not quite right when I bought it. 
 

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Use a voltmeter to test voltage drop while cranking. Using "alligator clip" tests leads will allow you to set the connection and then crank it over from the seat. Check the voltage on the battery post of the solenoid, and on the post going into the starter. If voltage is very low, start working back to the battery posts to see where the bad connection is. If voltage is the same all the way back to the battery posts, there is an issue with the starter or a mechanical problem causing the starter to work extra hard. You should be able to turn the engine over by hand with the fan and pushing in on the belts with the other hand if the belts slip. 

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8 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

If you can turn the engine over a complete revolution with a wrench it's not hydro locked

2 complete revolutions are required to verify it's not going to hydraulic lock.

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