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1600 loadstar transmission options


Missouri Mule
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Looking at a nice 73 1600 loadstar grain truck up in online auction. Ad Is very vague like usual but says 4 speed transmission and it for sure has 2 speed rear end. All the ones I've been in have 5+2. I just assumed they didnt know what they were talking about but doing a little reading apparently I didnt.

So still not sure which it has for sure. I know my bil has a 1600 5+2 and with 300 bushel corn it needs em all. Granny low is useful in soft fields loaded. I'm wondering with hills and back roads if this thing really is a 4 speed if I'll even get along with it??? 

Comments?? I'm not close enough to go look, and I'll call and ask but cant guarantee my answer I'll get. So assuming it's a 4 speed.... do I walk away or what

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I’m not sure what you are planning on doing with the truck, but I wouldn’t be afraid of a 4 speed. There were also 3 different variations of the 5 speed offered, so it is hard to know what you are comparing to. On a 73 I’m assuming that the 4 speed would be a t98. Good tranny, only drawback is a fair sized hole between 3 and 4, but you can get around that with the 2 speed rear.

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When I was a kid dad had two cabover loadstars. A 1600 with 304 and a 4&2. It was gutless wonder but got a lot of corn hauled. There was a hill or two dad would go around but that was more the 304 than the 4&2. Later got a 1800 with 345 and 5&2. That could climb the hills better but again I think it was more the bigger engine than transmission. 
I was young and it was many years ago so I make no guarantee on my memory 

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Been running the Loadstar in my profile pic since 1984 with a 4 and 2. The little 304 gets the job done but there is no power to spare with over 300 bushels on it. No complaints on the transmission. Just wish I had a 392 under the hood sometimes. 

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We have two straight trucks with 4+2 transmissions, a C/50 and an F-600. The C/50 will hold 350 bushel and you can get 450 on the F-600. The F-600 will get there as long as you are not in a hurry. Both have been relegated to hauling seed for the planters and drill using the endgate augers for the last 25 years, but they were once the only grain haulers in our operation. 

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How much you hauling and your Location have alot of impact.

300 bushels is plenty for a 345 or 304. The transmission and axle ratio help. Here's a few examples.

I farm near Alix AR. I have to pull some significant hills/small mountains when hauling grain and it's 100 miles round trip. My bob trucks have a 345 or 366. Two are 5+2 and one is a 4 speed + single speed axle (with 6.5:1 ratio it's very slow, top speed around 45mph). They all pull the hills the same and end up about 5mph pulling the grade coming up from white oak creek. My 85 9370 has a 350 cummins with 13 speed and hauling 800 bushels in my hopper bottom it end up almost as slow, about 10 mph. I don't haul grain to market with the Bob trucks much anymore but do haul other heavy things. Honestly I worry more about being able to stop than taking the hills fast.

A friend farms just passed the hard grades I pull. His way is mostly flat with some rolling hills,  about 50 miles round trip. He hauls 500 bushels in a 10 wheeler with a 345+2. He hauls 500 bushels easier than I haul 300.

A friend has logged all his life. He used to run 290 cummins in trucks up and down the steepest mountains in Arkansas, on and off road. Now he has the high horsepower engines doing the same job (same mountains with the same loads). He just makes a little better time now. But honestly it's not much faster overall.

Depending on where you are in Missouri you might have some steep grades.

I hope this helps.

Thx-Ace 

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I have a 73 loadstar, 345 and 4 speed with 2 speed axle.  It was once my only grain and pig hauler.  Broke an axle once trying to start a load on soft ground while pulling a loaded gravity box…..yeah, dumb.  Anyway, discovered the truck was equipped with rather tall non standard ratio gears in the differential.  When the differential gears went bad awhile later because of some stray chips I didn’t get out from the axle fiasco, I got the correct third member from a salvage yard according to the line sheet.   Made a world of difference in the overall performance of the truck.  I think the axle ratio was more important than the 5speed, 4speed trans in my case.  Also, at some time in my ownership of this truck I did switch the wheel rims to the proper width for 9:00 x 20 tires to get away from those deadly two piece rims nobody wants to work on.  Anyway, these are good dependable trucks that will last a long time with adequate maintenance.  Good luck.

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Well I had to choke. It was a very straight little single axle truck. Had a nice 15.5' bed with extensions that would of held 375 bu easily. It brought 8400. Figured if I'm going to pay a premium it better be what I want. I was willing to pick it up and gamble on the trans because it was so clean. Worst case I could have swapped it out. The trucks I'm used to running both have a 5+2 with what I believe they call 1:1 5th.

So pattern is 1-R-2-3-4-5. I like that setup. The 5th to 4th shift gets you up alot of smaller grade hills, you can shift fairly early to keep rpms up so they are close together. Low hole will crawl up a mountain just slow.

Heck all these old gassers are slow, no matter what. But they sure are kinda cool to drag out and listen to pulling load after load. Loadstars are some of the toughest old trucks I've ever been around. almost like they were built to haul or something.....

Anyway we just picked up a nice 4900 with 466 anyway. Probably needed another one like a hole in my head as mom used to say. 

I'll keep looking. 

 

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On 11/18/2022 at 1:35 PM, Missouri Mule said:

Well I had to choke. It was a very straight little single axle truck. Had a nice 15.5' bed with extensions that would of held 375 bu easily. It brought 8400. Figured if I'm going to pay a premium it better be what I want. I was willing to pick it up and gamble on the trans because it was so clean. Worst case I could have swapped it out. The trucks I'm used to running both have a 5+2 with what I believe they call 1:1 5th.

So pattern is 1-R-2-3-4-5. I like that setup. The 5th to 4th shift gets you up alot of smaller grade hills, you can shift fairly early to keep rpms up so they are close together. Low hole will crawl up a mountain just slow.

Heck all these old gassers are slow, no matter what. But they sure are kinda cool to drag out and listen to pulling load after load. Loadstars are some of the toughest old trucks I've ever been around. almost like they were built to haul or something.....

Anyway we just picked up a nice 4900 with 466 anyway. Probably needed another one like a hole in my head as mom used to say. 

I'll keep looking. 

 

In our C65 with 5+2 4-high is higher ratio than 5 low, so pattern is 4-L 5-L 4-H 5-H, i have always treated the 1700 loadstar tanker this way and cant tell the difference between 4-H and 5-L, so I usually just skip one, for whatever the difference is i lose  enough in a transmission shift that it isn’t worth it. 
just food for thought. 

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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

In our C65 with 5+2 4-high is higher ratio than 5 low, so pattern is 4-L 5-L 4-H 5-H, i have always treated the 1700 loadstar tanker this way and cant tell the difference between 4-H and 5-L, so I usually just skip one, for whatever the difference is i lose  enough in a transmission shift that it isn’t worth it. 
just food for thought. 

That's still the way my little kodiak is. I dont get it. Tried to drive it like that and just fail to see why. Like you said cant tell much of a difference between them. I do the same thing and skip one. If I need a shift normally my 5th low gets me up the hill and if not I grab 4th low. I'm not a truck driver by any means but I've logged a bunch of backroads overloaded in old 5+2's. 

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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

In our C65 with 5+2 4-high is higher ratio than 5 low, so pattern is 4-L 5-L 4-H 5-H, i have always treated the 1700 loadstar tanker this way and cant tell the difference between 4-H and 5-L, so I usually just skip one, for whatever the difference is i lose  enough in a transmission shift that it isn’t worth it. 
just food for thought. 

Thats the same as our 76 F700 with a 370 4bbl. I also usually skip that shift

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6 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

In our C65 with 5+2 4-high is higher ratio than 5 low, so pattern is 4-L 5-L 4-H 5-H, i have always treated the 1700 loadstar tanker this way and cant tell the difference between 4-H and 5-L, so I usually just skip one, for whatever the difference is i lose  enough in a transmission shift that it isn’t worth it. 
just food for thought. 

Years ago I drove a wrecker that had a similar shift pattern. The C60 I have now is a simple low - high in each gear. Unless loaded with an extremely heavy load of stone I shift 2, 3, 4, 5 low, 5 high. It's usually not worth splitting every gear the exception being steep hills.

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9 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

In our C65 with 5+2 4-high is higher ratio than 5 low, so pattern is 4-L 5-L 4-H 5-H, i have always treated the 1700 loadstar tanker this way and cant tell the difference between 4-H and 5-L, so I usually just skip one, for whatever the difference is i lose  enough in a transmission shift that it isn’t worth it. 
just food for thought. 

Always heard that setup called a “working” 4th. No worry about 2 speed not making the downshift. The old vacuum 2 speeds could be a little contrary completing a shift. 

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Our 1700 is a 4+2 with a 345.  Hauls 300+ bu of corn with no issues.  Like all IH gassers it is thirsty, but then again, that 345 is moving around 30,000+.

20220930_172138.jpg

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I normally use the two speed as a range extender.

I either shift from low to high and back in 1st or 5th depending on the situation. I don't split the gears all the way through.

These gas burners have enough rpm to work without a two speed anyway.

Thx-Ace 

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On 11/22/2022 at 7:12 AM, Mr. Plow said:

Our 1700 is a 4+2 with a 345.  Hauls 300+ bu of corn with no issues.  Like all IH gassers it is thirsty, but then again, that 345 is moving around 30,000+.

 

Thats a nice IH. We are moving the same weights with a 304. Found out just how important a two speed axle is this harvest when this one quit. We were able to set the two speed in high range and work it that way. With a five mile run to work each day didn't want to be screaming along in 4 low. Lucky we did not have soft ground to deal with or it would have been really hard on the clutch taking off loaded in 1 high. Repair kit for the two speed was hard to find and expensive but really good to get it back working with all 8 speeds again. 

 

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