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Why are some diesels noisy and others quite?


acem
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43 minutes ago, Farmall Doctor said:

Because they still were still indirect injection with precombustion chambers. 

I cannot believe how many guys do not know that is the starting nature of those engines. the designers knew that going in- they need glow plugs👌 

 

they should put decals on the dash_ Attention if you hate glow plugs don't buy this motor vehicle😏

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I've got a Detroit 4 stroke Fuel Pincher in a bucket truck that will water your eyes. It's the easiest starting diesel, gutless, but all it has to do is idle and move the truck a bit so I'm ok with it. Apparently it needs some serious injector work and gets some diesel in the oil. After looking at the manual it can stay that way. German diesel just purrs and is an ok starter but it sure runs sweet.

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16 hours ago, Gearclash said:

A pre 2003 5.9 will have a lot of diesel clatter, an ’03 and up 5.9 will not.  In ’03 the 5.9 was equipped with a high pressure common rail fuel system.  This did two things.  It allowed for far less combustion chamber noise because the fuel injection event was tailored to generate a slower cylinder pressure rise, hence less diesel knock.  Plus there was no distributor pump to make a racket.  Listen to an injector pump on a test stand and you will understand where quite a bit of “diesel” noise comes from.  I never thought a 400 series IH was very quiet, for sure not if it was equipped with an American Bosch pump.  Man those pumps clatter.

The pumps do clatter but I think the motor itself sits there,quietly purrs like a kitten.Now a 312 that's loud not injection pump loud either just loud .My H70 has a muffler but it seems the noise just comes out from the engine itself,right through the cast block not all out the muffler. 

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We have an RV powered by a 2001 Cummins 8.3 ISC 250, thing does not smoke or smell diesely at all BUT in true Cummins fashion the engine banging is louder than the exhaust.  The worst sounding diesel I have ever been around was a little Yanmar 1600 CC 2 cylinder, sounding like a small washtub being hit with a club at idle, higher RPM did not help, I left that little machine parked unless I had to trim the front or the property with the fancy mower.

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4 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

The 5.9 cummins always seems to me like it is fighting itself to stay running at idle. High compression and early timing have alot to do with it.  For one of the most interesting sounding diesels, the big Cat 1693 truck engine is very distinct with it's pings and pops at idle. It must have something to do with the fuel system. The best smelling diesel to me is the D-282. Most indirect-injected diesels have a more organic smell. The absolute worst that I have had to smell in an enclosed shop has to be a Leyland! Oh my... eyes burning and everything. 

It was explained to me once that the clatter and rattle of the precumbustion chambered Cat engines at idle was due to the compressed air from the cylinder and the burning air charge from the prechamber meeting each other coming and going in the neck of the prechamber. It was always amazing to listen to a D8H/D8K or D9G/D9H being cold started below about 10 degrees.  I always wondered how an engine could knock and bang that loudly and not self destruct.  

To me the German diesels seems to sound toothless and quiet at idle, but then have loud combustion noise under load.  A cold start inside would quickly make my eyes burn.  
Brian

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I have no technical expertise but I love the sound of an old two stroke Detroit. Back 15-20 years ago dad had a 671 in a grain truck. I was in the field one night with my brother. He was fueling the combine and we could hear dad shifting. Thought he was a half mile away. Still didn’t pull in the field then heard him shifting again. Ok first time was 2 miles away. 
Same thing with gas engines. My brothers first truck had the same nickname in high school and college by different people for the same reason. ‘The gray ghost’ because you could hear it before you could see it! 81 ford 400. 

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I got a 95 Dodge 3500 dually with the 5.9 12 vavle and a 99 Ford f350 with the 7.3 powerstroke. What a diff between the two noise and starting plus alot of other things.I'm lucky to get 9 mpg with the Ford  {its a automatic} where i get 14 to 17 mpg with the old Dodge 5 speed. Wife hears the Dodge about 1/2 mile away.

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12 hours ago, Farmall Doctor said:

The 5.9 cummins always seems to me like it is fighting itself to stay running at idle. High compression and early timing have alot to do with it.  For one of the most interesting sounding diesels, the big Cat 1693 truck engine is very distinct with it's pings and pops at idle. It must have something to do with the fuel system. The best smelling diesel to me is the D-282. Most indirect-injected diesels have a more organic smell. The absolute worst that I have had to smell in an enclosed shop has to be a Leyland! Oh my... eyes burning and everything. 

Prechamber engine exhaust to me has kinda a "sweet" smell to it.  Its weird that I can tell engines by smell.  

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For a different sound

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commer_TS3

Different in that 3 cylinder opposed 2 stroke with only 1 crank.  105 bhp@2400 rpm.

Killed in the takeover by Chrysler

https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2014/10/ferraris-flat-twelve-dyno/

UK and others at that time assessed road registration charges in steam horsepower style - number of cylinders and bore dimension.  Which is why a lit of UK cars of that era were very under-square at the cost of high piston speeds and bore wear.  This one was assesses as a 3 cylinder.  As a bloke here who ran them says "they had limits but they made a lot of people a lot of money"

 

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3 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

UK and others at that time assessed road registration charges in steam horsepower style - number of cylinders and bore dimension.  Which is why a lit of UK cars of that era were very under-square at the cost of high piston speeds and bore wear. 

'Zactly! another stupid tax scheme like taxing by the number of windows in your house.

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