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Antique door lock


ihrondiesel
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The house we live in is 100+ years old and still has some of the original doors.  One of the lock assemblies needs some repairs as it won’t latch. It’s similar to the one I have pictured here

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I screenshotted this picture from an EBay listing. Mine is quite similar with the main difference being that it uses all leaf springs instead of coil springs.  Does anyone have an idea where to find someone capable of repairing it?  I’m wondering if someone who works on clocks might be a candidate, but I don’t have anyone I know who could do it. 
Edit: the one pictured looks to have leaf springs but is a little different than mine. 

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Mc master car or similar sell spring steel in various forms. Round and probably flat. Could make your own it you had to. 

Some guys I used to work with made their own traps one time including the springs with spring steel purchased and bent in a jig.

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Try an ‘antique store’ or a thrift shop, many have old doors for sale, we picked up one just a couple days ago, 29in. wide, 5 panel, with hinges & knobs,  and locking mechanism, no signs of wood rot, grand total of $30.00

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57 minutes ago, ihrondiesel said:

One of the leaf springs is broken

Is what I thought was probably the problem. I have some experience heat treating springs. When MTD took over Cub Cadet the replacement pto clutch springs were no longer heat treated. When you buy spring stock. You can cut, bend and shape just like mild steel. It doesn't become a spring until heat treating. I got practice making springs restoring two potato diggers. I use the same treating process as I did for the clutch springs. When you have the spring shaped and formed.  Heat the whole thing red hot. Careful it is easily deformed at this stage. Quench it in oil. Gently swish it in oil to cool as quickly as possible. Oil will flame when you first put it in and quit as it cools. I use molten wheel weights to temper. Just dip in the molten lead until it comes out without any lead sticking to it. Then just let it cool by itself.  You now have a spring.

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I’ve made springs that were larger by quenching and tempering to a blue color by drawing the heat. Not that what Snoshoe won’t won’t though. Can put a fair amount of spring in mild steel even but a known spring steel will last longer. 

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4 hours ago, ihrondiesel said:

One of the leaf springs is broken

I have a drawer full of that junk, if you can get some photos and dimensions i will see if i have anything 

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1 hour ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

What type of oil do you use?

What ever used oil is handy unless it is grey. Don't want any water in it.

 

3 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

I’ve made springs that were larger by quenching and tempering to a blue color by drawing the heat. Not that what Snoshoe won’t won’t though. Can put a fair amount of spring in mild steel even but a known spring steel will last longer. 

Did that on the potato planter seat spring. On smaller items find the lead easier

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22 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I have a drawer full of that junk, if you can get some photos and dimensions i will see if i have anything 

Here you go, Seth. See what you can come up with. Thanks. 
 

Also, if Seth doesn’t have a match for me and I can find a spring, should I try to braze the piece of faceplate that is cracked off?

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1 hour ago, ihrondiesel said:

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I put a red line on the broken spring

I brought up making replacement springs. If those springs have corrosion like the rest of the parts I see there. Then your going to have to consider replacing all of them. A replacement lock makes a lot of sense at this point.

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4 minutes ago, snoshoe said:

I brought up making replacement springs. If those springs have corrosion like the rest of the parts I see there. Then your going to have to consider replacing all of them. A replacement lock makes a lot of sense at this point.

Yes a replacement would probably be best. FWIW that’s mostly just dust that you see in there. 

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