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Tool ID thread


Sledgehammer

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1 hour ago, 12_Guy said:

If I may join in. Anyone know what this is??3BE23CF9-F443-4CAD-A51D-BEC6BA1B5E10.thumb.jpeg.320ca59e5d71089287ad478f8b44971b.jpegA764B343-4DEF-4CCF-A5FC-A90CC1A7AFE1.thumb.jpeg.949d9da2bd83082709c1bd1bc4c8f8b6.jpeg
 

I think I know what it was used for but I would like to see your comments. 

That is a super heavy set of tongs. The extended flat jaws say sheet metal but the pins passing through don’t. Interesting and heavy duty.
 

First one of those I’ve ever seen for sure 😊

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I came across this today. Did some trading with an ex co-worker. This was in with some old tools that belonged to his FIL. I believe it’s a screwdriver for tight quarters and most likely a MAC based on the others with it. It has no markings. The man was a heavy equipment mechanic. 

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Also ended up with these large “Plomb” wrenches.  P&C was a subsidiary. The (smallest one) 1-1/8” is a P&C. Largest is 1-7/16”. The Plomb name was dropped for a more commonly known tool name “Proto” in 1950 so I believe based on some internet searching that these are 1945-1950 vintage wrenches. They are stout.

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I know nothing about this company but I have a claw hammer that I think is a Plumb. U instead of O. Not sure if they are related but the symbol stamped before and after the name on the wrench looks like a plumb "bob" . You know,  the thing used with a string to set a wall perfectly vertical. 

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1 hour ago, 12_Guy said:

I know nothing about this company but I have a claw hammer that I think is a Plumb. U instead of O. Not sure if they are related but the symbol stamped before and after the name on the wrench looks like a plumb "bob" . You know,  the thing used with a string to set a wall perfectly vertical. 

“Plumb” made lots of hammers. Mostly carpentry and ball peen. The hammers have a telltale dark red handle stain.  Plomb” was a different company altogether. The “O” was in the name early and later became an upside down triangle. I believe this was due to copyright laws. In 1950 the name was changed to “Proto” which still exists today as far as I know. 

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That screw driver could be close quarters but also think increased leverage for stubborn screws. i bought some P&C wrenches in the seventies from an industrial type hardware that was going under and had them on sale. They are more modern looking said to be economy line for Proto. I still have them and still as good as new even though they have seen some use as I work(ed) on heavy equipment.

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On 1/19/2023 at 10:37 PM, 12_Guy said:

If I may join in. Anyone know what this is??3BE23CF9-F443-4CAD-A51D-BEC6BA1B5E10.thumb.jpeg.320ca59e5d71089287ad478f8b44971b.jpegA764B343-4DEF-4CCF-A5FC-A90CC1A7AFE1.thumb.jpeg.949d9da2bd83082709c1bd1bc4c8f8b6.jpeg
 

I think I know what it was used for but I would like to see your comments. 

Thought I should get back to my tool. I'm pretty sure that you guys are correct about it being for roofing. It appears to be blacksmith made. I think the curved pins were to keep the jaws aligned and possibly provide a depth stop for the metal. 

Nearby,  where these tongs came from, there were numerous roofs that were similar. Probably all done by the same man possibly one of my family. Anyway they were not your typical standing seam roof. The metal ran sideways instead of vertical. I think probably all fabricated on site. The bottom edge of each sheet was a folded under to make a hook. The top was folded maybe 90 degrees and nailed then the fold was completed to form the top hook ready for the next sheet. End seems were folded as well. There were no nails showing except for the ridge cap. It wasn't particularly pretty as the metal was flat and showed every wrinkle or high/low spot in the frame. By the time I was born it was decades old and had numerous coats of silver roof coating. Probably was fairly cheap in its day with the only cost being a roll of the steel and some nails. 

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59 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

Some sort of wood working adz?  I need to consult the vintage catalogs I guess

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Those are called ship carpenters adzes around here. The ones with lips on the outside edges are the most sought after. Don't use the pin for a pry bar. Another thing I thought of regarding the wrenches is to suggest you check out a web site called Alloy Artifacts. Tremendous amount of info on U.S. toll makers of sockets and wrenches mostly. P & C was started by two blacksmiths. maybe somebody could make a link to it.

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On 1/26/2023 at 9:14 PM, Sledgehammer said:

“Plumb” made lots of hammers. Mostly carpentry and ball peen. The hammers have a telltale dark red handle stain.  Plomb” was a different company altogether. The “O” was in the name early and later became an upside down triangle. I believe this was due to copyright laws. In 1950 the name was changed to “Proto” which still exists today as far as I know. 

Proto still exists today and is owned by Stanley black and decker along with Mac tools. Unfortunately proto, wright, blackhawk, and other great tool brands are no longer popular due to snap on matco, cornwell and mac being considered the “best” Armstrong made decent tools too but have been got shut down a few years ago. 

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11 minutes ago, int 504 said:

Those are called ship carpenters adzes around here. The ones with lips on the outside edges are the most sought after. Don't use the pin for a pry bar. Another thing I thought of regarding the wrenches is to suggest you check out a web site called Alloy Artifacts. Tremendous amount of info on U.S. toll makers of sockets and wrenches mostly. P & C was started by two blacksmiths. maybe somebody could make a link to it.

I have been on that site before. Good info. There was a bunch of those adzes at a sale I attended. These two just happened to be in a basket where nobody saw them. People were bidding hard after the others. Lots of ship building going on behind the scenes in Southern Illinois I guess 😊

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13 minutes ago, int 504 said:

Wooden sailing ships and timber framed buildings also. Perhaps a revival of sailing ships on the Great lakes???

I’m about 5 hrs too far south for that. Maybe a wooden barge for the Wabash or Ohio river. My guess would be work on old cabins or something with heavy Timbers like barns. 

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2 hours ago, Jake19917561 said:

Proto still exists today and is owned by Stanley black and decker along with Mac tools. Unfortunately proto, wright, blackhawk, and other great tool brands are no longer popular due to snap on matco, cornwell and mac being considered the “best” Armstrong made decent tools too but have been got shut down a few years ago. 

I still buy a lot of Wright tools. Their biggest downfall is the lack of a truck that comes to the shop every week. They are very big in the mining and oil/gas industries and that is what they go after. They have no offerings for any type of automotive specialty tools or anything like that is another big reason they are not very popular with traditional mechanics. Most of my bigger wrenches and sockets are all Wright 

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30 minutes ago, 1466IH said:

I still buy a lot of Wright tools. Their biggest downfall is the lack of a truck that comes to the shop every week. They are very big in the mining and oil/gas industries and that is what they go after. They have no offerings for any type of automotive specialty tools or anything like that is another big reason they are not very popular with traditional mechanics. Most of my bigger wrenches and sockets are all Wright 

Yea they are marketed as industrial tool lines like proto, blackhawk, Williams owned by snap on, I know Armstrong was marketed to the army and such for the United States. Armstrong also made a lot of the craftsman USA tools. S-k tool quality has come back up too I buy from them. Love USA made tools. 

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2 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

I thought I would put up a pic of one of the surviving roofs of the type I discussed earlier. You can see the horizontal seams. 2C17A23F-BC2E-4900-8D67-CFC338FAF5CE.thumb.jpeg.b9457377d7ae5e39d947cd05db2bdff9.jpeg

Flat seam roofing is very popular in the high budget homes around here, usually copper and soldered joints . Have a builder we work with has done some, has an LP fired iron to do the joints. Makes a very high quality roof. 

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2 hours ago, Jake19917561 said:

Yea they are marketed as industrial tool lines like proto, blackhawk, Williams owned by snap on, I know Armstrong was marketed to the army and such for the United States. Armstrong also made a lot of the craftsman USA tools. S-k tool quality has come back up too I buy from them. Love USA made tools. 

I had a set of 1¼ Armstrong spuds when I was erecting. I trusted them enough to stand on them. 

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Eating tools I guess.

Found them with the last of my mom's stuff.

Belonged to my grandma and I remember eating with them as a small boy.

Came over with them when they came over hear from Germany about 1920 so have to be well over a hundred years old.

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I can’t say that I’ve seen a hammer quite like this one. Again, a broken handle junker I cleaned up. Did it have a specific purpose not having a claw?  Slate? Masonry? I really don’t know.  I drove a few nails with it and it works for that 😊

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43 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

I can’t say that I’ve seen a hammer quite like this one. Again, a broken handle junker I cleaned up. Did it have a specific purpose not having a claw?  Slate? Masonry? I really don’t know.  I drove a few nails with it and it works for that 😊

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Appears to be a type 3 Cheney adze hammer

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