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This tractor had LT235/85-16 truck tires on the front when I got it they seemed to have some life left in them

Was doing some loader work the other day and the tread started delaminating on one 

With the run up of prices on tires and the less than 100 hour a year use I couldn't justify new and found a set of 10-16 four rib recaps on a LT265/75-16 carcass

I think they look ok

 

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We are running re-grooved H9.50-16 14 ply airplane tires on our mower tractor since 2007.  Came from a place in Houston ready to mount on new yellow rims.  Airplane tires are unique and since the cords go bead to bead they are very resistant to thorns. They are not perfect but I have not had a flat tire due to thorns in the past 8 years of commercial mowing.

 

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20 minutes ago, oleman said:

We are running re-grooved H9.50-16 14 ply airplane tires on our mower tractor since 2007.  Came from a place in Houston ready to mount on new yellow rims.  Airplane tires are unique and since the cords go wall to wall they are very resistant to thorns. They are not perfect but I have not had a flat tire due to thorns in the past 8 years of commercial mowing.

 

I will keep that in mind for next time 

A quick search found this place selling low tread and recapped aircraft tires 

Aircraft tires for agricultural use Avoid flats. Tractor Fronts, Planters Etc. Aircraft tires for agricultural use Avoid flats. Brush Mowers, Bush Hogs Etc. John Deere planter tires. Aircraft tires for ag use. Ford 8n Rims.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Soybean stalks are heII on implement tires.

These aircraft tires stops those flats.

I hear they are tough to mount/dismount?

The tires are tubeless  after about 5 years of use, started leaking down in about 5 months, due to what I thought were pin-hole leaks near the bead, because when I did a leak test I got bubbles.  I called the selling place and a tech explained that that is a normal failure mode and those are a safety feature and probably why the were removed from air service,  in our  service, to just add a tube and carry on.  Local tire place cleaned out the old leak proofing  that had dried out and added their tubes, charging normal front tire servicing price.  I talked to the techs while they worked, the talkative one, said they were about the same as the high-ply industrial tires to service with no unique issues.  BUT THEY ARE NORMAL INDUSTRIAL TIRE GUYS!

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Airplane wheels are normally two piece bolted together with an O ring seal. When you lost control of an L1011 32 ply wheel and tire assembly and it fell over it was best to get help to stand it up again. The Aluminum or magnesium wheels have steel brake keys and SS heat shields so the wheels aren't particularly light but the tires! a 32 ply rated has an amazingly thick sidewall and is frekin heavy by itself.

Eastern didn't actually own any tires. Thompson rubber had a contract to supply the tires which due to the short life of the tread were recapped multiple times and would be marked so - R1, R15, etc. As long as the tire body inspected and X-rayed OK they just kept capping. Thompson was always trying to get the rubber compound just right. Too hard and it would chunk out, too soft and giving up the number of landings. When runway grooving started to become common the tires would have chevrons cut in them from the grooves. It didn't hurt them and they only appeared when the tread was new and thick and stopped occurring when the tire was well worn.

Tough life ice cold having 300,000lb slamming down zero to 160 now.

The smaller sizes that you'd use on a loader are likely off a commuter plane and are comparatively just as tough and heavy.

DC9 wheels had a habit of developing scary cracks in the wheel that no one would approach to deflate. Having the cops shoot the tires was a complete failure so a deflating device was at every station. It was a railroad spike welded in a steel chock like affair that was place against the tread, the relatively safe approach to the tire, and the plane towed over it. I saw it in action once and it worked nicely. I was amazed at how much the tire resisted until it punctured. No wonder they don't get flats in thorns.

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Nice looking ford we had one growing up it was a stout loader tractor that needed a lot of weight on the rear to be able to use the loader to its full potential. It was disappointing when it was sold and  we replaced it with a 50 Hp  4x4 Kubota in 2011 the kubota is nicer with the modern features but that old ford would lift a lot   more and feel more stable. And I don’t think the kubota will be around in 50 years like that 3cylinder ford 3400. We always ran old 7.50-16 truck tires on ours they held the weight 

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57 minutes ago, forwhldrv said:

Nice looking ford we had one growing up it was a stout loader tractor that needed a lot of weight on the rear to be able to use the loader to its full potential. It was disappointing when it was sold and  we replaced it with a 50 Hp  4x4 Kubota in 2011 the kubota is nicer with the modern features but that old ford would lift a lot   more and feel more stable. And I don’t think the kubota will be around in 50 years like that 3cylinder ford 3400. We always ran old 7.50-16 truck tires on ours they held the weight 

Thanks I like it well built tractors 

Its a 1969 spent its life mowing at a nursery out lasted the owner and his son.

They always kept it inside   

With the blade on the back it feels stable with a heaping load of 3/4 stone in the bucket at the top of travel 

I'd like to find a set of "Pie" weights for it  

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5 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

"Pie" weights

I always liked the look of them.

I made a 3PH hitch weight for a 3414 IH I had . Keeping an implement on the hitch for counterweight was always in the way. I already had two sets of weights on it but they weren't enough. Plastic 55 gallon drum works great as it can be slid around a bit to hook up. I cut slots to slide a draw bar through and welded a couple of 4" channels to it with spacer drilled for top link. Left it at concrete company and they filled it with waste for cheap and were kind enough to load it onto my trailer. It was long ago so I don't remember how much it weighed but it was enough. It went with the loader when I sold it.

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2 hours ago, New Englander said:

Keeping an implement on the hitch for counterweight was always in the way.

I have to do a floor pour in the spring so I am going to make a weight box.

My primary loader is a Ford 655 backhoe so it's second nature to watch out for the back  

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21 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Thanks I like it well built tractors 

Its a 1969 spent its life mowing at a nursery out lasted the owner and his son.

They always kept it inside   

With the blade on the back it feels stable with a heaping load of 3/4 stone in the bucket at the top of travel 

I'd like to find a set of "Pie" weights for it  

I don’t know if these had pie weights on it we had regular bolt on wheel weights and a block on the three point hitch when we didn’t have something on the back of it. We found a set a few years ago at a show for 30$ for 6 weights and made an  adapter to fit the kubota rims and painted them orange. 

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Been spending some time at the tire shop lately myself. Put new steer tires on the Allis 720. One had developed a slow leak, pretty sure they were original. 38 or so years of service is pretty long for goodyear's in my book. The day I picked them up, talked to 'Jimmy" about a set for the '03 GMC. Really thought the last two sets were going to be the last for it but it keeps on going. Suppose there might even be another someday? To steel a line from Jeff Foxworthy, new tires on this thing are about like putting a new chandelier in a haunted house.

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  • 3 weeks later...
1 hour ago, Ian Beale said:

Sounds a bit like "There are pilots who have landed with the gear up and pilots who will"

I was close once.

I experienced a runway incursion when on very short final in a T34 - guy pulled right onto the runway at a towered runway. I was being a bit of an arse went around flying over him lower than needed and pulled up sharply whereupon the tower cleared me to land on the cross runway while giving the other guy a number to call. My almost acrobatic maneuver was distracting enough but when the huge gear horn went off behind my head I went around again joining a proper pattern for the now vacated original runway.

Humbling lesson learned 50 years ago.

I do a GUMP check even in my fixed gear Cessna. U is for undercarriage and my wife gets a laugh at my autonomous response  - Down and bolted.

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10 hours ago, New Englander said:

I was close once.

I experienced a runway incursion when on very short final in a T34 - guy pulled right onto the runway at a towered runway. I was being a bit of an arse went around flying over him lower than needed and pulled up sharply whereupon the tower cleared me to land on the cross runway while giving the other guy a number to call. My almost acrobatic maneuver was distracting enough but when the huge gear horn went off behind my head I went around again joining a proper pattern for the now vacated original runway.

Humbling lesson learned 50 years ago.

I do a GUMP check even in my fixed gear Cessna. U is for undercarriage and my wife gets a laugh at my autonomous response  - Down and bolted.

That was from a many thousand hours Royal Flying Doctor pilot after he "qualified" while distracted by horses loose on a ranch airstrip

Later

An RFDS pilot spends a lot of time idle while the clinics are being conducted.  Rather than sit around that bloke reasoned that, if he didn't pass his medicals he didn't have a job.  So he took golf gear and practiced up and down the strip while waiting.

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18 hours ago, nomorejohndeere said:

A little far for me 

There is set for sale in New England same thing missing 4 weights 

The 4 weights missing in both sets are likely the ones that go around the the valve stem they are unique  

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On 11/12/2022 at 6:57 AM, New Englander said:

Airplane wheels are normally two piece bolted together with an O ring seal. When you lost control of an L1011 32 ply wheel and tire assembly and it fell over it was best to get help to stand it up again. The Aluminum or magnesium wheels have steel brake keys and SS heat shields so the wheels aren't particularly light but the tires! a 32 ply rated has an amazingly thick sidewall and is frekin heavy by itself.

Eastern didn't actually own any tires. Thompson rubber had a contract to supply the tires which due to the short life of the tread were recapped multiple times and would be marked so - R1, R15, etc. As long as the tire body inspected and X-rayed OK they just kept capping. Thompson was always trying to get the rubber compound just right. Too hard and it would chunk out, too soft and giving up the number of landings. When runway grooving started to become common the tires would have chevrons cut in them from the grooves. It didn't hurt them and they only appeared when the tread was new and thick and stopped occurring when the tire was well worn.

Tough life ice cold having 300,000lb slamming down zero to 160 now.

The smaller sizes that you'd use on a loader are likely off a commuter plane and are comparatively just as tough and heavy.

DC9 wheels had a habit of developing scary cracks in the wheel that no one would approach to deflate. Having the cops shoot the tires was a complete failure so a deflating device was at every station. It was a railroad spike welded in a steel chock like affair that was place against the tread, the relatively safe approach to the tire, and the plane towed over it. I saw it in action once and it worked nicely. I was amazed at how much the tire resisted until it punctured. No wonder they don't get flats in thorns.

I've always thought they should have a small blade turbine spin the tires up to speed before touchdown🤔

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