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Ripper shanks


vtfireman85
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Would a gravity down single ripper work on a smallish dozer? Do they require down pressure? Mostly it would be for tearing out pine roots. I could easily hoist with a winch. 
i cannot say i have ever seen one on a TD7 size crawler. Looking at the 12 in my other post it looks fairly complex and i am not sure i need anything quite as elaborate. 

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Short answer, yes. I have used single shank fast hitch on a 560 Farmall to break some hard pan but also to dig underground wire in for my well when I had a farm. Can buy cheap ones for three point but some are real cheap, but there are better built ones out there. The one i used had a shear bolt in case you really ran up against something solid, but my tractor would slip first.  Older wheeled ground breaker is a better choice for durability. 

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The geometry of the shank can pull it down depending on soil conditions so as much as hydraulics are used for down pressure they also are important for depth control 

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An old farmer told me this story about the first ripper he ever saw.

A salesman brought a  single shank ripper for the farmers to try out. This was in the early 1950s and most big row crop tractors in this area were H and M farmalls. The ripper was pull type with a single acting cylinder, no down pressure.

They demonstrated it first in some sandy ground down close to the river and it was easy to pull even with an H. They went to some loamy ground and it was harder to pull and pulled up big chunks of hard pan.

Then they took it to what's now our place which is heavy alluvial clay. They hooked it up to a stout M. It bounced a couple times then sucked in. When it got all the way in it killed the M dead in its tracks. They tried to pick it up. The tires flattened and the hydraulics whined but it didn't come up. They tried to back it up but it killed the M no matter what they did. Finally they put two more tractors on the back and pulled it out backwards!

The salesman took it back to the store. No sale that day!

Thx-Ace 

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I have a nice old IH single shank subsoiler on steel wheels, still has original decals but I can't remember the model number.  It is clutch lift so no hydraulic down force.  

I tried it behind by H once.  Worked ok until it caught a big rock and then I just stood there and spun.  Clutch lift so couldn't lift it up, had to pull it backwards.

I was told that prior to drainage tile the idea was that these would improve drainage.

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20 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

I have a nice old IH single shank subsoiler on steel wheels, still has original decals but I can't remember the model number.  It is clutch lift so no hydraulic down force.  

I tried it behind by H once.  Worked ok until it caught a big rock and then I just stood there and spun.  Clutch lift so couldn't lift it up, had to pull it backwards.

I was told that prior to drainage tile the idea was that these would improve drainage.

Athey maybe? There was a few early manufacturers 

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2 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

DE: Lesson 8 Special Drainage Situations

I have a No. 4 Allis very similar to that, mole and all. I have ripped some wet areas with it. Seems to have helped but we haven't really had any very wet conditions since I did that. If I get everything else caught up I may rip those areas again this fall. We have perfect conditions for it now.

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5 hours ago, DT Fan said:

I have a No. 4 Allis very similar to that, mole and all. I have ripped some wet areas with it. Seems to have helped but we haven't really had any very wet conditions since I did that. If I get everything else caught up I may rip those areas again this fall. We have perfect conditions for it now.

Roughly how deep does/could the mole go? 

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30 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

Roughly how deep does/could the mole go? 

I believe the mole would follow the depth of the ripper? Theoretically you could set the mole higher if you had a way to attach it, but my assumption is it’s going to pull in a straight line from the attachment point. 
 

 

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2 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

Roughly how deep does/could the mole go? 

I would think however deep the ripper was put in the ground ? And that might depend on age and design of the ripper?

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1 minute ago, iowaboy1965 said:

I would think however deep the ripper was put in the ground ? And that might depend on age and design of the ripper?

 

1 hour ago, Ihfan4life said:

I believe the mole would follow the depth of the ripper? Theoretically you could set the mole higher if you had a way to attach it, but my assumption is it’s going to pull in a straight line from the attachment point. 
 

 

I guess i was wondering how long these things were as i would envision the mole tunnel would Just crush if it wasn't deep enough. Seems more like a device to separate people from dollars. 

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Don't know enough about them myself. Would be fun to play with one a bit....

I suppose if you were running one 18" or so in a field with no critters on it the mole tunnel might stay open? Especially if the dirt were a bit damp ish when it was formed? 🤷‍♂️

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2 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

 

I guess i was wondering how long these things were as i would envision the mole tunnel would Just crush if it wasn't deep enough. Seems more like a device to separate people from dollars. 

A single ripper shank is not a great expense, and most farmers weld enough to make the mole. So no big amount of money changes hands.  😉  Unless your meaning the fuel man. 🤣

 A company named Hensley what they called a tooth for putting on the blade. They mounted to the top of the blade. Worked good on cutting roots and such. They went away as most dozers started have ripper on the rear from new. If you could find one or the company is still around a lot less fussing than building your own for the rear.

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Cat, and Balderson also had blades with back up rippers on them, the shanks weren't all that long, but they would fold back when pushing forward, and hinged to fall down when the blade was raised, then stay in place when lowered to rip at least at the ends of the blade.

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