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Sheep?


vtfireman85
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On 11/3/2022 at 6:28 AM, New Englander said:

The flat tops around Glenwood Springs, CO have flocks. Shepard wagons here and there and Great Pyrenees dogs guarding.

So one of my colleagues had a Great Pyrenees pet and wanted to see to see one at work so we drove up and saw a flock. There was a bit of snow and my friend ventured into the field wanting to get a better look. The dog alerted and started his way. Remembering the size and power of his pet dog he beat a hasty retreat.

Since he owned one he knew of their story. As he explained, the dog is taken from mom and put on an ewe as a pup so the dog identifies with the sheep and naturally protects its family. With the white coat they blend right in.

F065723F-13A7-42BD-9F15-549C6D091776.thumb.jpeg.72adba6f634a9e82a976be2066fac95d.jpegThis guy here was brought here to guard the sheep. When cold weather set in he decided the kids needed guarding more than the sheep. As winter faded, and sunny warmer days were on the way, he decides he better watch the sheep again ūü§™

Sheep are gone, but he’s still here. If you grab his collar he’ll lay down, roll over, and put his feet up. 
But he’s big enough that if he thought you were threatening, you would be lunch, and most likely never seen again…

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5 hours ago, Doug in NY said:

We have sheep, these are some Cotswold lambs we bought this summer; the two bigger ones have been bred.  We also have some hair sheep, no pictures of them on this computer.  Sales of meat and fleece are the profits with them.  We have one that the fleece was sold this spring for $116, it is a whether, he is a Teeswater.  We have used goat in the past to clear weeds from horse pasture and to kill off poison ivy, when I had my NYS farm there was poison ivy everywhere and the goats were the best way to get rid of it.

7.22.2022 cotswold sheep .jpg

It doesn’t bother them? I would like some goats for a while. Don’t want to own any though. 

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...few sheep pics

...and I will address @acem concerns  over the possible introduction of  ''homo  erectus''    body fluids  into certain    ''Ovis Aires''...in a couple of days hence..Off to the ''water '' farm tomorow,early  a.m.

...I belive he   @acem  is entering into the realms of fantasy here...but perhaps he has had some direct insight into this  interesting connection.....:rolleyes:

Mike

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Back in college I saw an album at an import record store that had a small flock of sheep on a pasture. They were all wearing garter belts and hose net stocking. The album was titled "when mem were men and sheep were nervous" or something like that.

I didn't buy the album but it disturbed me. When I see sheep that image comes to mind.

Somethings can't be unseen.

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I'll bet it is the same album but with a different cover.

It's the right time frame. The right type of music. The right type of record label.

The album cover you posted was quite controversial because of the image of John Wayne and was unable to be in many stores. I expect the album I saw was the alternative cover. It was at Starship records in Tulsa Oklahoma in the mid 80s.

 

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On 11/4/2022 at 9:35 PM, vtfireman85 said:

It doesn’t bother them? I would like some goats for a while. Don’t want to own any though. 

eating the poison ivy does not bother the goats.  there is at least one company that rents sheep for land clearing.  it is a good deal for the goat owner and the land owner.  

 

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On 11/5/2022 at 2:35 PM, vtfireman85 said:

It doesn’t bother them? I would like some goats for a while. Don’t want to own any though. 

be very carefull   with goats, Seth

...you could say goats  are just like Democraps.....they breed trouble...they consume anything..including my dear Mother's cardigan...(long time gone..my 'pet' goat....)..they virtually rape  anything ,food wise..even chew spark plug wires off old Allis Chalmers  tractors...breed prolifically.....and tax your patience.....

...and on a more serious note, goats are a huge problem in the back country of NZ...have ''culler's''   out after them, trying to reduce the numbers ...and if out hunting, one hears a   continuous screaming piteous  'cry'    it will be a bunch of male goats gang raping a female on heat...just a horrendous spectacle....

I still love to out with a rifle,..but derive no pleasure from killing an animal...(just hunt for some nice eating young stag..)..but have been known to roll a bunch of male goats in the above circumstances.......

Mike

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3 hours ago, mike newman said:

.but have been known to roll a bunch of male goats in the above circumstances.......

That they still stay around in those circumstances demonstrates what an old professional dog trapper referred to as "the power of the puss".

They're a similar problem in rangeland Oz - about the 1980's it was calculated that in NSW about half the grazing pressure in their rangelands was from feral goats and kangaroos.

A big increase in harvesting those goats for market since about the 1980's here.  That has driven a lot of exclusion fencing to manage them, with a lot run inside for the market.   They are now named "rangeland goats".  Prices have  boomed but with a slump at the moment.

We made a lot more from harvesting feral goats than we ever did from professionally harvesting kangaroos.

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39 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

I know this is straying from sheep, but what are kangaroos good for commercially? Steaks, shoes, dog food??????

The skins produce thin but very strong leather, used particularly in sporting footwear.  From about the 1960's I have a Sears ad for boots made from it but advertising like that much less likely these days.

There is some use for human consumption but suffers from a couple of things.  First is that there is not much of that grade of meat on a carcass.  There is a lower weight limit for carcasses as well, which "avoids most of the tender cuts" - more economical for processers to target heavier carcasses as more economical to bone out.  But selecting for lower grade cuts.  As my father used to say "I could find a lot of kangaroo steaks around the front end of a bullock".

So most of it ends up in pet food.

All harvesting pretty strictly controlled.  Compulsory courses to qualify for a license, including marksmanship and hygienic harvesting practices.  In practice you better have 1 MOA or better rifles as only head shots are allowed and a roo head isn't very big.   Minimum calibre was 222R, a lot of .223, some 22/250.  Rarely bigger due to ammo costs and the killing power isn't needed.  Shooting only between dusk and dawn using spot lights, delivered to freezer stations and weighed in.

They can breed at a ferocious rate - in good seasons 1 just out of the pouch, one in the pouch and another one on hold on the slips ready to go.  We can get pest control permits to shoot and leave in those circumstances.

And the green scene is as you can well imagine.

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On 11/12/2022 at 11:51 AM, Ian Beale said:

The skins produce thin but very strong leather, used particularly in sporting footwear.  From about the 1960's I have a Sears ad for boots made from it but advertising like that much less likely these days.

There is some use for human consumption but suffers from a couple of things.  First is that there is not much of that grade of meat on a carcass.  There is a lower weight limit for carcasses as well, which "avoids most of the tender cuts" - more economical for processers to target heavier carcasses as more economical to bone out.  But selecting for lower grade cuts.  As my father used to say "I could find a lot of kangaroo steaks around the front end of a bullock".

So most of it ends up in pet food.

All harvesting pretty strictly controlled.  Compulsory courses to qualify for a license, including marksmanship and hygienic harvesting practices.  In practice you better have 1 MOA or better rifles as only head shots are allowed and a roo head isn't very big.   Minimum calibre was 222R, a lot of .223, some 22/250.  Rarely bigger due to ammo costs and the killing power isn't needed.  Shooting only between dusk and dawn using spot lights, delivered to freezer stations and weighed in.

They can breed at a ferocious rate - in good seasons 1 just out of the pouch, one in the pouch and another one on hold on the slips ready to go.  We can get pest control permits to shoot and leave in those circumstances.

And the green scene is as you can well imagine.

And another thing - they're migratory.

So, if in the middle of a raging drought and you get a storm,  guess who arrives en masse almost before the green gets to show?

You can have three guesses and the first two don't count

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And I ought to mention that hot topic of "extinction".

The big kangaroo species responded extremely well to the development for grazing livestock - pasture, water etc.  They are the species that are harvested commercially to quotas based on population counts.

Some of the smaller ones not so much to the competition.

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11 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

  From about the 1960's I have a Sears ad for boots made from it but advertising like that much less likely these days.

That pre-dates my recollection by about 20 years, but Cabelas quit carrying hunting boots made of kangaroo skin back in the 1980's (IIRC), but they returned them to the catalog maybe 10-15 years later.

I had a pair and they were quite comfortable.

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