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cotton #2 question


littlered166
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Just once, even though it looks like it, there’s very little left. It won’t pay for the expense of going through it again. I picked over some with a four row way back. I picked over it almost a whole afternoon and didn’t have but maybe 1 1/2 bales. Most times there’s probably less than 25 lbs left.

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We use to "scrap" cotton ; which was a second picking. If the first picking yielded 7-800 lbs then scrapping would bring 150-200 lbs at best. Producers stopped scapping when the picker costs surged and cotton genetics improved to where first picking yielded the majority of the expected yield.

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I believe in the early days of mechanical cotton picker they at times would pick a second time. Defoliants and growth regulators also came on in the 60 and 70's.  The growth regulators help open cotton bowl.  Until the bowl is open the picker cannot get it.

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On 10/28/2022 at 4:10 PM, Lars (midessa) said:

When cotton was picked by hand, was that much left in the field?

I have picked cotton by hand, not a single bowl was allowed in a picked field.  The problem with picking by the pound is that it easier to just hit the easy areas. In the old days cottons did not mature due to herbicides so we would pick multiple times in a season.  

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18 hours ago, littlered166 said:

Thanks guys for the lessons about cotton.

Thanks to the Alabama RPRU for their show on cotton. 

It was very informative to a group of South Dakota flat landers who had never been around cotton.

I now want to get into an area which grew tobacco.

I have never been around that either.

I did have the pleasure of talking with a gentleman at the Wisconsin RPRU that had grown it.

I could have listened to him all day about it.

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I'm pretty sure you can grow tobacco in South Dakota.

Just start some seed in the late winter. Transplant them too the garden. Keep the bugs and disease away. It's not that hard to grow in the garden.

We have grown it before Just because and we don't smoke, chew, or any of that.

Thx-Ace 

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1 hour ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Thanks to the Alabama RPRU for their show on cotton. 

It was very informative to a group of South Dakota flat landers who had never been around cotton.

I now want to get into an area which grew tobacco.

I have never been around that either.

I did have the pleasure of talking with a gentleman at the Wisconsin RPRU that had grown it.

I could have listened to him all day about it.

I don’t miss raising tobacco at all. The labor and my inability to have enough of it was the worst part. The markets after the buyout were nothing but frustration. 

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Lower grade is my understanding. Used for things like tarps ect. The stripper heads are more of a nylon rotating set of brushes that takes everything. I think stripper cotton is grown on more marginal land?

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2 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

What is stripper cotton then or what is the point of it??

There is a lot of differences between stripper and picker cotton. Picker cotton is usually a little taller and more "bushier" than stripper cotton. Picker cotton has longer staple where as stripper cotton has shorter staple. "Staple" refers to the length of the fiber. Most stripper cotton is called "storm proof" because it can withstand more wind and moisture before the lint will start to fall out of the boll.  Stripper cotton basically has shorter fibers and requires fewer heat units. Therefore it can be grown at higher elevations and fewer days. That is one reason they have been able to start growing newer varieties of cotton as far north as southern Kansas in the past few years. And since they started putting lint cleaners on stripper machines the cotton is a lot cleaner when it gets to the gin and gins out a lot better so the grades are a lot better than 30 years ago.

33 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:
34 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Lower grade is my understanding. Used for things like tarps ect. The stripper heads are more of a nylon rotating set of brushes that takes everything. I think stripper cotton is grown on more marginal land?

Stripper cotton is used for everything from denim to T-shirts and underwear among other things.  The only "marginal" land that cotton is grown on would be considered dryland, at least in this region.

Here is a pic of batts and brushes. Brushes are a hard nylon and the batts are rubber, similar to mudflaps. The other pic shows how they are mounted, usually alternating. (red-batts   black-brushes)

image.png.708187c35bf0f578558453536f9dcedd.png

image.png.ab8a235799c0e16dcb764a111d9529f5.png

 

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11 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Thanks to the Alabama RPRU for their show on cotton. 

It was very informative to a group of South Dakota flat landers who had never been around cotton.

I now want to get into an area which grew tobacco.

I have never been around that either.

I did have the pleasure of talking with a gentleman at the Wisconsin RPRU that had grown it.

I could have listened to him all day about it.

I grew it till 2009

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1937059_101428539872063_7031292_n (1).jpg

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