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Cotton in bales


littlered166
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Watch the video but cotton pickers in essence have a big round baler mounted to them and are fed via fan directly into the baler after leaving the picker head.

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3 hours ago, IH Forever said:

How long they can sit in the field?  That I have no idea.  I've only seen this on the interweb......it's all confusing to this IA farm boy.

They will hold up fine for months but are ginned as soon as possible

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They are Ok until it rains, days, weeks, maybe months here in the desert of California. Being 100 miles from cotton country I see it but don't know to much. In the 8x20 module days they put traps over them to keep fog ad dew off of them. Any cotton that gets wet is lower graded so lower priced.

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They are wrapped in plastic and hold up well to the weather. In the south, most cotton is grown on sandy ground so it don't get waterlogged.

Every round cotton bale is made by a JD picker. CIH pickers make a rectangular module.  

image.png.699357b9c8ddc43b75e02a30bd90f49e.png

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5 minutes ago, acem said:

Every round cotton bale is made by a JD picker. CIH pickers make a rectangular module. 

And IF the rumour is true, in that the row units on CIH pickers are made by John Deere, then EVERY bale of cotton is harvested by John Deere.

Although, around here, and in a few other places that I have seen (Mangum, OK) there are still a few of the Allis-Chalmers  type strippers still in use.

 

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The John Deere pickers, both styles, are about the only ones you see here in Southeast Alabama.  The round bales save having to have a cart to carry the cotton from the picker to the module builder and having a module builder.  The module builder is what compresses the picked cotton into the long rectangular bales that used to be the standard.  The cart enables the picker to be dumped in the field without having to drive the picker to the module builder.  In the picture above the picker drove to the module builder to dump.  The new picker's are super expensive, but the claim is you don't need any support equipment, just the picker.

Bill

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3 hours ago, acem said:

They are wrapped in plastic and hold up well to the weather. In the south, most cotton is grown on sandy ground so it don't get waterlogged.

Every round cotton bale is made by a JD picker. CIH pickers make a rectangular module.  

image.png.699357b9c8ddc43b75e02a30bd90f49e.png

Who makes the module covers with the CaseIH logo on them? They're not listed in the parts catalog, unless I looked past it. I did find an ashtray in the parts breakdown. Thought that was interesting.... but not $45 interesting.

Mike

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If I am remembering correctly, it has been over a decade since John Deere came out with the baler picker.

In 2015, my cousin and I went to Akeny, IA in the hope of seeing them build these machines, only to find out they were building a run of self-propelled sprayers at that time.  However they did have one baler type picker, which I assume was a field test unit parked outside, and the tour guide did tell the group a little bit about it, he also mentioned that JD had stopped all production of their conventional cotton pickers, EXCEPT for one order of 250 machines that went to the People's Republic of China.

As interesting as anything was, is that the tour just happened to end up at the gift shop.

Yes, they are expensive, but really no more expensive than a big combine and corn head, a big planter, or a big 4WD tractor, any of which you are looking at close to a million dollars, according to the JD "U-build it" web site.

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When at RPRU Alabama, one of the growers told of plastic sacks blowing into their cotton fields.

The sacks are ground up into the cotton when harvested by the picker and cannot be removed.

The plastic will not take dye so it remains usually white.

If you walk through a black light and see specks in the cloth of a shirt, that is the scrap plastic which they cannot remove.

Plastic garbage is also effecting our clothing.

Please pick up that trash!

Or better yet, decline the sack and leave it in the store.

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Here’s something that came out of some cotton at the local gin a couple of years back, it must have been laying in the field and they built a module on top of it and the module truck picked it up with the cotton. They found it stuck to the magnet in the cleaner. No telling how long it was in there.

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9 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Aren't Case/IH cotton pickers and sprayers made in northern Minnesota?

Nope,they are made in Benson, Mn which is west central area. They also build the self propelled sprayers and fertilizer spreaders in the same plant. 

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On 10/28/2022 at 5:59 AM, Art From Coleman said:

I am remembering correctly, it has been over a decade since John Deere came out with the baler picker.

2010 ish.

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