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Husqvarna 365


vtfireman85
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“Bought” this for 50 bucks today from… for lack of a better term a friend. We had a backwards negotiation in which he wanted to give it to me. He says it runs great but is “tired”, whatever that’s supposed to mean. 10:1 odds it needs some rubber parts and some filters and a spark plug, compression test will tell more. 
i know nothing about the 365, seems stout, i was looking for a beater to do some dirty work with. 
 

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I have it’s red sister (Jonsered 2165).  65 cc version of the pre-Xtorq model 372.  So it’s a non-strato saw.  Should have a reasonably wide power band but won’t have the top end power of a 372 o.e (original edition) which is 71-72cc.  I would think it wouldn’t quite touch your 562, but would be in the same ball park if everything is up to snuff.  
 

they are east to work on and tons of aftermarket parts.  Could slap a 372 jug and slug on it of you want.  If I remember correctly you can’t put a xtorq top end on without some machining, so be cautious there if you do change The top end.

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3 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

Maybe port and muffler mod. Maybe just leave it be if its up to snuff. 

Change the fuel line, fuel filter, check the intake boot and impulse line.  Clean the carb, maybe a carb kit, trim the limiters.  Start there.  Run it like you stole it (which you did) for a few tanks and see if you like it.

can always do more later.

 

 

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I have a dream to slab stumps, i dug out a couple old maple stumps a couple weeks ago, they were rock hard and had some of the prettiest wood i have seen, all spalted and curly. No way i was sinking my 385 into it, but after some pressure washing i plan to give this thing a whirl with a square cut chain. 

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Compression feels low to me, my compression tester is an automotive style and has a foot of hose, I haven’t had good luck testing chainsaws with it. If you pick it up by the cord it slowly drops , and it pulls over pretty easily. Maybe I should do a leak down test to see if or where it is loosing?

does that even work on a 2 stroke? 

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Should get up to over 150, holding the throttle wide open while pulling the starter rope? Being 2 stroke more throttle more air. Should be a decent saw, I had a 359 that was good. Replaced it with an older 372.

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50 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

Compression feels low to me, my compression tester is an automotive style and has a foot of hose, I haven’t had good luck testing chainsaws with it. If you pick it up by the cord it slowly drops , and it pulls over pretty easily. Maybe I should do a leak down test to see if or where it is loosing?

does that even work on a 2 stroke? 

Pressure and vac test on a 2 stroke.  It mostly will tell you if you have leaks in the crank seals or base gasket and anything else you included in the test.  Just need to block off the exhaust port and intake somehow.  Pressure to 5 to 8 psi should hold for 10-15 minutes.  Pull a vacuum, should hold about the same.

This won't tell you if the rings are shot or not.

 

 

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I had a 365. It was a good powerful saw. Not XP so less expensive. Some of the later ones were 72 cc. I can't really recall how many motorcycles I encountered that were running until somebody took them apart for no good reason.... I would put some fresh gas and oil in it and fire it up and try it on some wood before I did anything else to it.

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12 minutes ago, int 504 said:

I had a 365. It was a good powerful saw. Not XP so less expensive. Some of the later ones were 72 cc. I can't really recall how many motorcycles I encountered that were running until somebody took them apart for no good reason.... I would put some fresh gas and oil in it and fire it up and try it on some wood before I did anything else to it.

It doesn’t start on its own, he had to dribble gas in the carb to get it to start, so its got some deficiencies that need addressing. 

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That's not uncommon for a saw that hasn't been run for a long time. Sometimes once you get one of those going and use it more frequently it works as it should. Worth a try as long as it doesn't scream out lean. If it exhibits lean symptoms you can't correct with the screws-STOP and go to your initial plan of compression test and replace rubber stuff. 

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7 hours ago, int 504 said:

I had a 365. It was a good powerful saw. Not XP so less expensive. Some of the later ones were 72 cc. I can't really recall how many motorcycles I encountered that were running until somebody took them apart for no good reason.... I would put some fresh gas and oil in it and fire it up and try it on some wood before I did anything else to it.

I believe that is called hot rodding 🤔 taking something that was working perfectly fine and ripping it all apart...usually with the intent of making it better, often lacking follow through

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1 hour ago, hardtail said:

I believe that is called hot rodding 🤔 taking something that was working perfectly fine and ripping it all apart...usually with the intent of making it better, often lacking follow through

 

8 hours ago, int 504 said:

I had a 365. It was a good powerful saw. Not XP so less expensive. Some of the later ones were 72 cc. I can't really recall how many motorcycles I encountered that were running until somebody took them apart for no good reason.... I would put some fresh gas and oil in it and fire it up and try it on some wood before I did anything else to it.

If it was working Perfectly I wouldn’t own it, it “ran good but was getting tired” according to the P.O. It has been used regularly as the primary firewood saw but unless warm requires gas dumped down the carb to start, which requires tools. 
perhaps you both feel that is “working perfectly” but i have no time for such BS. It either is fixable to be made to work properly or it gets shipped. If i need tools to start something, that indicates a real problem. 
whenever i buy a vehicle, or a piece of equipment it gets serviced, fluid filters and problems repaired, i consider it good maintenance. I have no way of knowing what condition rubber components are in without cleaning and inspecting them, i see absolutely 0 advantages in dismantling a 25 year old machine to “inspect” consumable parts without replacing them.

 

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2 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

i see absolutely 0 advantages in dismantling a 25 year old machine to “inspect” consumable parts without replacing them.

1 reason Older OEM parts are sometimes better quality than what you can get today.  
 

2nd would be to save a few bucks on a saw in unknown condition.  
 

If you feel better replacing them, by all means go for it.  I’d say 80% chance fuel line and filter are due to be replaced.  50% chance for the diaphragm, as that also sees raw fuel.  Intake boot and impulse line are maybe 25% chance they need to be replaced.


 

 

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4 hours ago, Mudfly said:

1 reason Older OEM parts are sometimes better quality than what you can get today.  
 

2nd would be to save a few bucks on a saw in unknown condition.  
 

If you feel better replacing them, by all means go for it.  I’d say 80% chance fuel line and filter are due to be replaced.  50% chance for the diaphragm, as that also sees raw fuel.  Intake boot and impulse line are maybe 25% chance they need to be replaced.


 

 

As my college small engine teacher used to say, if your saw doesn’t start by the third pull, something is wrong with it. 

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I opened things up a little this morning before work, found a Chinky carburetor on it. I think it is supposed to have a Walbro HD12-1 i am inclined to not even screw with this carb. 

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10 minutes ago, Captian Kirk said:

It might have had a epa carb on it originally 

Meaning it has stops or meaning its non adjustable? 

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Have you looked at what a replacement carb would cost?  I’ve rejuvenated a few old small engines with carbs from Amazon, some OEM and some knockoffs. Returns are hassle free with Amazon so if there are any issues with a replacement it’s easy enough to just return it and you’re only out a little bit of time. 

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1 minute ago, MTB98 said:

Have you looked at what a replacement carb would cost?  I’ve rejuvenated a few old small engines with carbs from Amazon, some OEM and some knockoffs. Returns are hassle free with Amazon so if there are any issues with a replacement it’s easy enough to just return it and you’re only out a little bit of time. 

The one I just ordered was 91 dollars shipped, its an EPA carb , I presume that refers to the stops (at least i hope) but it is the Walbro that is listed for that saw. 

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