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1660 vs 1666


MinnesotaFarmall
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Looking to purchase our first combine. Have a couple choices of a case IH 1660 or a case IH 1666. Both machines have close to the same hours. 1666 is close to $20k and the 1660 is only at $12k. I don't know squat about combines except changing belts and bearings are a pia. One has standard rotor and seives, concaves and the other has what they describe as large wire grates?? What does a guy need for a combine to come from their lot to my house without needing to change stuff out to harvest corn? We have a 963 corn head available to use. 

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I should add, we are not going for ultimate speed. Just an efficient machine that will do 150-200 acres of corn between milkings. We are getting tired of custom guys, by now, we could have owned a nice newer machine. Some years we don't have much to do, some years we have plenty left over. All depends on what we have for silage crop. 

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Hours on the machine are not as relevant as what parts need to be replaced because of wear . One machine might be field ready and the other might need 15,000 of parts and labor to make it equivalent 

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As mentioned, you want the large wire concave for corn. And a standard rotor is supposed to be better than the specialty rotor as well. 

The '66's longer seives would be nice, but definitely not necessary for corn or soybeans. 

The main advice I would give though, buying any used combine... have an experienced person go through it with you. The inside of a combine is more expensive than the outside, if you don't know what to look for you could be making an expensive mistake. It only takes one small rock about 5 seconds & a little luck to turn a $50,000 combine into a $15,000 machine.

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 Should really have large and small wire concaves unless you will only ever do corn and beans. I have ran the 2 3 thousand dollar IH combines and it is surprising how dependable they are.  If money is no object go for the 1666. If your on a shoe string budget that 1660 will serve you well. I was told by the auctioneer when I bought my first 1460 for $2000 that you no this is a salvage combine! It ran trouble free for many years. 

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I have had a friend talk to me about what to look for, but like I said, I'm totally green on these machines. I'd like it if he was available to see. Been waiting a couple days to see if he can look at one by him, but haven't heard back. He stays busy so I don't want to rush something that's free advice. He has a really nice new Holland that comes with two heads for half of the 1660 price we contemplated too. Only thing seems like there are no aftermarket parts for them. 

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4 minutes ago, Takn4aFool said:

IH or Cummins engine.....not sure when the change happened

Think the ih. From what I gather the Cummins came when the big letters and numbers went on the side. This has the old style decal on the sides.

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54 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

Does CaseIH use round bar concaves? I don’t know much about red machines, but that is the standard here for corn and beans. 

That I do not know. Watched an old video of how to set up from case IH itself and seems like there were two different styles. Keystock and wire.

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Large wire concaves and keystock grates are what you want for corn and beans. You can get small wire for small grains or use coverplates on your first 2-3 large wire. Thats what I do. 
Do yourself a favor and hire someone to do inspection on them both and find out their history. You can easily put more money into one than the initial cost if you don’t know what you have. It is money well spent. 

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8 hours ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

I have had a friend talk to me about what to look for, but like I said, I'm totally green on these machines. I'd like it if he was available to see. Been waiting a couple days to see if he can look at one by him, but haven't heard back. He stays busy so I don't want to rush something that's free advice. He has a really nice new Holland that comes with two heads for half of the 1660 price we contemplated too. Only thing seems like there are no aftermarket parts for them. 

I'm near St Cloud, MN. Be willing to look at one for you if it's not too far away.

I have the official IH Axial flow inspection form on my computer at home too. It would give you a decent guide on what to look at.

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29 minutes ago, Cattech said:

I'm near St Cloud, MN. Be willing to look at one for you if it's not too far away.

I have the official IH Axial flow inspection form on my computer at home too. It would give you a decent guide on what to look at.

Would maybe take you up on that but be further drive for you than myself. Machine is in Mankato. I think I might get a chance to go check it out tomorrow and see. 

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Don’t know squat about a rotory combine, but give me an old Massey and I am pretty sure I can get a cleaner sample and leave less in the field, but only get about half the acres in a day, on corn. 
I took a lot of pride in setting up a machine, but again it has been 30 years and my embellisher might have added to it. 

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54 minutes ago, 1480x3 said:

Always heard the speeds were not right on the CDC powered 16 series till the 44,66,88s came out. Was there a kit or update to correct that ?

Yes the engine was running close to same rpm as navistar one was and made them use oil. Dads would use a gallon every two days when pushed hard. Slowed them down by regearing the pto by the 66 series. 

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Not completely the same but my cousin prefers his 1688 over his other combine which is a 8230.  No joke.  I've heard from a lot the 66/88 was the most bullet proof AF made before and especially since.  They run that 1688 along side the 8230 from start to finish every year.  

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Along with the longer sieves, the hydraulic system on a 1666 is the same closed center system as a 2166. More responsive header lift and field tracker.

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15 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Not completely the same but my cousin prefers his 1688 over his other combine which is a 8230.  No joke.  I've heard from a lot the 66/88 was the most bullet proof AF made before and especially since.  They run that 1688 along side the 8230 from start to finish every year.  

Yes they were a simple good machine but 21,23 2588 and the 6088, 7088 and newer legacy are good machines. It is logistics though you can buy a fairly decent shape 8230 now with header under 200,000. A 1688 about 20,000. But if you have a 2000 or more acres the capacity of flagship combines is tremendous in soybeans and wheat. 40 ft Draper head 2 mph faster than a 88 30 ft auger head.that speed and capacity means a lot.

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4 hours ago, dale560 said:

Yes they were a simple good machine but 21,23 2588 and the 6088, 7088 and newer legacy are good machines. It is logistics though you can buy a fairly decent shape 8230 now with header under 200,000. A 1688 about 20,000. But if you have a 2000 or more acres the capacity of flagship combines is tremendous in soybeans and wheat. 40 ft Draper head 2 mph faster than a 88 30 ft auger head.that speed and capacity means a lot.

Only guys around here that run one combine cut about 1000 acres or less.  You can't screw around with small grains and malt barley getting rained on.  The 1688 more often then not makes it through the harvest without breaking down vs the 8230.  Right now the 8230 is in the shop getting the CVT drive worked on.  I would say out of the other combines, the 2388 was the best of the lot.  The 21s had some teething issues and a neighbor of mine who we seed for has had more trouble with his 2588 then the 2388 it replaced.  Only one 7088 in the neighborhood and its been a good combine.  

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ended up going with the 1666. Has nearly new rasps, bars, and concaves. Almost all the chains are new on it. Tech is friends with a guy who rents our beef cow pasture. The tech said that's the best one we had on our lot. They test all the heads they work on with it because everything works on the machine. It has a little damage on the back panels and miss matched main front tires, but drives good and all fluids checked out good after we got it home. I'm totally green with these things, but after a good run through of the manual, it doesn't seem as complicated as I initially thought. Anyway, here it is. 

KIMG1532.JPG

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