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Did he use chains or straps?


1256pickett
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 I saw a photo of a new Deere combine flipped up on a lowboy after going around a corner. They had cross chained front and rear,  problem was the length of the X tie down was long.  when the guy went around the corner the long chains allowed one side of the combine to rotate up off the deck. X tie down is ok but they should have a short chain on 4 corners around the axle housings to the outside rail of lowboy. I don't think the combine was damaged but i'm sure the driver needed new shorts.

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I really don't know many details, but apparently JD wrecked 3 new combines on the way to the Farm Science Review in Ohio last week.

Don't know of any serious injuries. 

They were driving them down  the road when a car pulled out in front of one of them.

I've heard one is totalled, another salvageable and the last one will make it to the field this fall after some repairs. All 3 were sold.7818(1).jpg.fca4bfb11cffb8fbb56b08b41d64c7d6.jpg

 

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from what i've seen over the years he might not have had any load securement....seen backhoe tractor being hauled no securement, guys hauling steel coils in Chicago no chains/straps, guy who took down the old farm house with a trackhoe got done and loaded the hoe and took off without chaining it down.

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Oh my , somebody  going to get a scolding when dad gets home 

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maybe the trucking companies should use trucks like we had in the 80s , Louisville with a 238 DD won't  dump a combine off the trailer🙂 . The hp the trucks have now is crazy coupled with poor drivers and look what you get

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I read about this on a different site.  Sounds like JD employees chain the combines down, the truck drivers can’t chain them on the Deere lot.  So someone said the good drivers leave the Deere lot, and either add more chains, or completely redo the chains.  The poor drivers, or lazy drivers just pull out and leave.  So this was probably a lazy driver?? 

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41 minutes ago, Farmall1066 said:

I read about this on a different site.  Sounds like JD employees chain the combines down, the truck drivers can’t chain them on the Deere lot.  So someone said the good drivers leave the Deere lot, and either add more chains, or completely redo the chains.  The poor drivers, or lazy drivers just pull out and leave.  So this was probably a lazy driver?? 

I haven’t hauled a new jd combine so I can’t verify that, but I highly doubt it. I can tell you at Grand Island they load a case ih on your trailer in 15 minutes and you pull away unsecured to a gravel lot to chain. I have loaded a few places such as Kinze where they help chain. I hauled a new jd Draper head and did all my own securement. They even hesitated to tell me where to chain it! Based on the machine being completely off the trailer I’ll take a guess that it either wasn’t chained at all, or chained with chains way too light.

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4 hours ago, barnsfull said:

I really don't know many details, but apparently JD wrecked 3 new combines on the way to the Farm Science Review in Ohio last week.

Don't know of any serious injuries. 

They were driving them down  the road when a car pulled out in front of one of them.

I've heard one is totalled, another salvageable and the last one will make it to the field this fall after some repairs. All 3 were sold.7818(1).jpg.fca4bfb11cffb8fbb56b08b41d64c7d6.jpg

 

These were being driven from one show site to another convoy style.  First machine pulled up quick to avoid hitting a truck, and the two behind piled into that on and each other.  

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5 hours ago, barnsfull said:

I really don't know many details, but apparently JD wrecked 3 new combines on the way to the Farm Science Review in Ohio last week.

Don't know of any serious injuries. 

They were driving them down  the road when a car pulled out in front of one of them.

I've heard one is totalled, another salvageable and the last one will make it to the field this fall after some repairs. All 3 were sold.7818(1).jpg.fca4bfb11cffb8fbb56b08b41d64c7d6.jpg

 

The reply I got from a trusted source:
 

Yes. So about 10 days ago. Two dummies from Ag pro and one from Deere decided to play bumper cars with million dollar combines. 

Story is that someone pulled out in front of the lead machine and they slammed back on the hydro. The second one wasn’t paying attention and rear ended the first one. And then started backing away from the first one. Then a third one comes up on the second one and smashes into him. They were headed to FSR and probably show boating a little bit. They took the least damaged one and threw parts from all three on it to make it presentable to be on the show grounds at the booth and then the other two got shipped back to the factory to get fixed. 

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22 minutes ago, 1256pickett said:

and then the other two got shipped back to the factory to get fixed. 

That should be interesting, since the factory is not set up to DIS-assemble the combine, and even the new ones that are flagged to have minor problems repaired, are not damaged, AND, since John Deere is not going to be doing this for free, how is the dealer going to pass the cost on down to the customer, and would the warranty be extended, and would the customer be told of the machine's history?

I guess that the dealer's insurance would pay, but the end user would still wind up with a machine that might never operate as advertised.

IF the three had been involved in a derailment, would they still have been shipped back to the factory, or just crushed and buried?

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12 hours ago, 1256pickett said:

The reply I got from a trusted source:
 

Yes. So about 10 days ago. Two dummies from Ag pro and one from Deere decided to play bumper cars with million dollar combines. 

Story is that someone pulled out in front of the lead machine and they slammed back on the hydro. The second one wasn’t paying attention and rear ended the first one. And then started backing away from the first one. Then a third one comes up on the second one and smashes into him. They were headed to FSR and probably show boating a little bit. They took the least damaged one and threw parts from all three on it to make it presentable to be on the show grounds at the booth and then the other two got shipped back to the factory to get fixed. 

I just don’t see how stuff like this happens, but it seems to happen a lot.  There is a large farm a little ways from me. They are far enough away that I don’t hear about them all the time. They have a lot of hired help. Several years ago two guys were “racing” while cutting beans. This is exactly as stupid as you would think it would be. They were both turning around at the end of the field in a huge cloud of dust, in a hurry because of the race, and hit the corners of each other’s platform. These were brand new, at the time, Deere machines. They hit so hard that both feeder houses were ripped off of the machines. The headers were smashed. They had to wait for the factory to build new feeder houses to repair them. The heads were totaled. 

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1 hour ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I just don’t see how stuff like this happens, but it seems to happen a lot.  There is a large farm a little ways from me. They are far enough away that I don’t hear about them all the time. They have a lot of hired help. Several years ago two guys were “racing” while cutting beans. This is exactly as stupid as you would think it would be. They were both turning around at the end of the field in a huge cloud of dust, in a hurry because of the race, and hit the corners of each other’s platform. These were brand new, at the time, Deere machines. They hit so hard that both feeder houses were ripped off of the machines. The headers were smashed. They had to wait for the factory to build new feeder houses to repair them. The heads were totaled. 

One common thing with these guys and your story. Not my money. If they didn’t pay for it that price tag is just a number. 

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On 9/24/2022 at 12:42 AM, 806 man said:

 I saw a photo of a new Deere combine flipped up on a lowboy after going around a corner. They had cross chained front and rear,  problem was the length of the X tie down was long.  when the guy went around the corner the long chains allowed one side of the combine to rotate up off the deck. X tie down is ok but they should have a short chain on 4 corners around the axle housings to the outside rail of lowboy. I don't think the combine was damaged but i'm sure the driver needed new shorts.

I hauled a lot of equipment and always looked at the angle of cross chains. I envisioned what could happen exactly the way you described it happened .I have been in many DOT classes, work now for the DOT and never once did anyone mention angles. I have questioned inspectors about it and they blew me off like I was nuts and not doing what the state mandated. I even suggested to fellow drivers about it and they just said nah you aren't right and took chains further down the deck.So I keep my mouth shut if I am not hauling it.

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That is a good question

When ever I Chain/Strap I always think of the radius from the trailer attachment point to the load and try to keep that short as possible 

The shorter it is the less distance it could possibly move 

The goal is to hold the load down on the trailer not pull it across the trailer 

 

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5 hours ago, Jacka said:

I hauled a lot of equipment and always looked at the angle of cross chains. I envisioned what could happen exactly the way you described it happened .I have been in many DOT classes, work now for the DOT and never once did anyone mention angles. I have questioned inspectors about it and they blew me off like I was nuts and not doing what the state mandated. I even suggested to fellow drivers about it and they just said nah you aren't right and took chains further down the deck.So I keep my mouth shut if I am not hauling it.

When I read up on cargo securement way back when, the “indirect loading” of securement devices was addressed.  Basically because of securement devices almost invariably being at some kind of angle to the imposed load, only half the WLL is allowed to be used of said securement device.  This is why I prefer to be at something like double of what is required for securement, because in any kind of a traffic collision, the forces on the load can quite easily exceed 1G (up to 10G+!) and cargo securement rules only call for adequate restraint for 1G forces or slightly higher.

jeeper61’s mention of capacity reduction chart for angled chains and straps is very appropriate; what it true there is true for cargo securement.

I am not a fan of cross chaining.  In my years of occasional flatbed hauling, I don’t think I have ever once had chains crossed.  I would guess 10 percent of the time I have though “Oh, this will need to be cross chained,” but by the time I get right to it I find there is a better way.  

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59 minutes ago, Gearclash said:

When I read up on cargo securement way back when, the “indirect loading” of securement devices was addressed.  Basically because of securement devices almost invariably being at some kind of angle to the imposed load, only half the WLL is allowed to be used of said securement device.  This is why I prefer to be at something like double of what is required for securement, because in any kind of a traffic collision, the forces on the load can quite easily exceed 1G (up to 10G+!) and cargo securement rules only call for adequate restraint for 1G forces or slightly higher.

jeeper61’s mention of capacity reduction chart for angled chains and straps is very appropriate; what it true there is true for cargo securement.

I am not a fan of cross chaining.  In my years of occasional flatbed hauling, I don’t think I have ever once had chains crossed.  I would guess 10 percent of the time I have though “Oh, this will need to be cross chained,” but by the time I get right to it I find there is a better way.  

You know,I agree.I should also say cross chaining is more to me term then a practice.I look at the points of what your hauling and chain it to keep it from going the way it wants. I also add extra chains. Its easier,faster,safer to load something once than try to get whatever it is back on the trailer after it fell off even if no one gets hurt or property damaged.The idea of just  crossing chains and your 100 % safe is ludicrous.I also like to go high on load latch points if the load has high top weight. I seen too many DOT class drones that don't think out of the box and look at what they are hauling not just the weight of it.If you go with flat low latch points and your load is top heavy doesn't take much to stress those chains to the max and if you have Itty bitty of slack from either a over looked catch point or just needed one more crank on ratchet binder you might have trouble. I know hauling odd ball farm and construction equipment makes you think.

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On 9/24/2022 at 10:12 AM, Art From Coleman said:

That should be interesting, since the factory is not set up to DIS-assemble the combine, and even the new ones that are flagged to have minor problems repaired, are not damaged, AND, since John Deere is not going to be doing this for free, how is the dealer going to pass the cost on down to the customer, and would the warranty be extended, and would the customer be told of the machine's history?

I guess that the dealer's insurance would pay, but the end user would still wind up with a machine that might never operate as advertised.

IF the three had been involved in a derailment, would they still have been shipped back to the factory, or just crushed and buried?

Sounds to me like these were deere combines right out of the factory going to a show. So deere and outsource employees. But if it was a dealer I would imagine they would have to eat the cost of said repairs. Insurance come into play here too.

Don't kid yourself there is plenty of disassembly and reassembly that goes on in a lot of  these factories. Often by folks whose sole job it is to do so.

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47 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

 

Don't kid yourself there is plenty of disassembly and reassembly that goes on in a lot of  these factories. Often by folks whose sole job it is to do so.

my first out of high school was at White Farm Equipment combine factory in Brantford,On. They had an area called the snag line where they completed or fixed combines. There was a guy they called Johnny Combine who could fix anything. He was off a farm. I think they used to send him out on problems in the field. They could fix anything back there

 If those JDs have no structural damage and it's a bolt on or rivet fix they could repair at factory. If its a cut and weld repair  IMHO they will be scrapped

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