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8820 jd dreaded countershaft


dale560
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Last year the 8820 was brought out for service and had a rattle or vibration on right side. So I decided to change bearings. There was a bit off noticeable play when lifting on pulleys. I bought a 14 ton 2 jaw posi lock thinking it would grab slots and remove pulley. That plan didn’t work the best so I made a puller to bolt on end of pulley assembly and rattled it with Milwaukee impact with a spacer on shaft between puller. Popped it right off of taper on shaft. Now to lift it down , remove bearing and start assembly. Heard horror stories of this for years and it isn’t a very hard job after you decide to do it. Will post pictures on Sunday going back together

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

Last year the 8820 was brought out for service and had a rattle or vibration on right side. So I decided to change bearings. There was a bit off noticeable play when lifting on pulleys. I bought a 14 ton 2 jaw posi lock thinking it would grab slots and remove pulley. That plan didn’t work the best so I made a puller to bolt on end of pulley assembly and rattled it with Milwaukee impact with a spacer on shaft between puller. Popped it right off of taper on shaft. Now to lift it down , remove bearing and start assembly. Heard horror stories of this for years and it isn’t a very hard job after you decide to do it. Will post pictures on Sunday going back together

DB811E27-772F-4287-8E0C-CA9C8B940F11.jpeg

1CF95B12-EF12-4D95-B8B4-3FC09F6253FB.jpeg

  Had to do the same on my 6620 a dozen years back.  The shaft wore enough so the bearing set collar would not stay locked in.  Did not need a puller, torch, or anything but tools.  Bad thing was it happened on the last 2 acres of corn for the year and the snow came while I was changing out the shaft.

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3 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I had to pull that sheave off of a 9610 a few years ago to replace the primary countershaft bearing. It had a small fire when the bearing went out. I had an old two jaw puller from an auction with long arms on it. It was a hard pull, but it popped off. 

I think they are the same size bearing or close to same setup. Dad had a really nice otc long jaw 10 puller he borrowed it out years ago to the neighbor to pull something on a 96 jd combine and they stripped the threads oh he was mad. Still have parts of puller will have to fix it one day. Thought for sure the posi lock would pull it off but the spacer shaft I had in there would let it wander around. 

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23 minutes ago, dale560 said:

I think they are the same size bearing or close to same setup. Dad had a really nice otc long jaw 10 puller he borrowed it out years ago to the neighbor to pull something on a 96 jd combine and they stripped the threads oh he was mad. Still have parts of puller will have to fix it one day. Thought for sure the posi lock would pull it off but the spacer shaft I had in there would let it wander around. 

I wouldn’t doubt if it’s the same bearing. I was always fascinated with 8820’s. There really weren’t very many sold new around here. I remember as a young kid looking through the literature at pictures of 30’ platforms and 12 row heads in amazement that anyone was actually running anything that big. My dad bought a 4420 brand new, and we had a 6620 many years ago. 6620’s and 7720’s were the most popular here. 

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19 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I wouldn’t doubt if it’s the same bearing. I was always fascinated with 8820’s. There really weren’t very many sold new around here. I remember as a young kid looking through the literature at pictures of 30’ platforms and 12 row heads in amazement that anyone was actually running anything that big. My dad bought a 4420 brand new, and we had a 6620 many years ago. 6620’s and 7720’s were the most popular here. 

This combine was bought new in Montana. There were a fair amount of 8820s here but they were all used machines very few new ones until the last year or two of production. Lots of new 7720, 7700 and 6600 here though. We were solid ih combine people but my brother bought this one when we started farming more in  2006 to save wheat straw. It has always been the second combine to leave around farm to finish fields while we had other combines off in far away fields. We kept the John Deere when we sold all the big stuff. Plan is eventually in a couple years to find a 2188 or 2388

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53 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I wouldn’t doubt if it’s the same bearing. I was always fascinated with 8820’s. There really weren’t very many sold new around here. I remember as a young kid looking through the literature at pictures of 30’ platforms and 12 row heads in amazement that anyone was actually running anything that big.

Likewise out here we couldn’t figure out how anybody made a living with a little 4420.  Guys running two 8820s weren’t not uncommon.  Only thing we had comparable to a 4420/4400 was the IH 715. 

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2 hours ago, dale560 said:

Last year the 8820 was brought out for service and had a rattle or vibration on right side. So I decided to change bearings. There was a bit off noticeable play when lifting on pulleys. I bought a 14 ton 2 jaw posi lock thinking it would grab slots and remove pulley. That plan didn’t work the best so I made a puller to bolt on end of pulley assembly and rattled it with Milwaukee impact with a spacer on shaft between puller. Popped it right off of taper on shaft. Now to lift it down , remove bearing and start assembly. Heard horror stories of this for years and it isn’t a very hard job after you decide to do it. Will post pictures on Sunday going back together

 

 

Not any 20 series but I’ve seen 7700s parked over that issue.  

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13 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

Likewise out here we couldn’t figure out how anybody made a living with a little 4420.  Guys running two 8820s weren’t not uncommon.  Only thing we had comparable to a 4420/4400 was the IH 715. 

There were a lot more cattle in this area 40 years ago. Most people didn’t raise a lot of corn and beans, although there were much larger operators than my dad at the time. 4400’s were common here. My dad almost bought a new 3300 that was on the local dealers lot a few years before he bought that 4420. The last year he ran it he covered 1,200 acres. We almost never got done in the same year we started. Times were different. 

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10 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

There were a lot more cattle in this area 40 years ago. Most people didn’t raise a lot of corn and beans, although there were much larger operators than my dad at the time. 4400’s were common here. My dad almost bought a new 3300 that was on the local dealers lot a few years before he bought that 4420. The last year he ran it he covered 1,200 acres. We almost never got done in the same year we started. Times were different. 

Your dad was smart to get the 4420 for even a tenth of those acres.  3300s are smaller then a 55.  Not by much but certainly wouldn't keep up to a late 55.  3300s were probably a nice combine for someone moving up from a PT 6ft-7ft combine or 45.  

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4 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Likewise out here we couldn’t figure out how anybody made a living with a little 4420.  Guys running two 8820s weren’t not uncommon.  Only thing we had comparable to a 4420/4400 was the IH 715. 

Big Bud----

Out of curosity----what is the biggest headers ya'll see operating out your way now???

We see alot of 36 and 40 ft headers running on the big J-D and C-IH machines here in the Mississippi Delta now. (mostly landformed acreage now)

Cutting 2x yield soybeans from the new varieties-----2 x width headers at 2x forward speed from my days back in the 80's with the M-F 750s.  (we just thought we were hitting the bull in the ass with a big axe!!!!):wacko:

All equals lots of trucks on the road in a hurry.  No such thing as a bob truck at the elevator here anymore.

Times have changed in a hurry for this old codger.

 

DD

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The 715, 4400, small gleaners and small Massey combines were common here years ago. A neighbor ran a gleaner C for decades.

It was easy to make money here back in the 70s. It was hard to make money here in the 80s.

Times change.

Thx-Ace 

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10 minutes ago, acem said:

The 715, 4400, small gleaners and small Massey combines were common here years ago. A neighbor ran a gleaner C for decades.

It was easy to make money here back in the 70s. It was hard to make money here in the 80s.

Times change.

Thx-Ace 

I think that was every area of the country. Used to be lots of 1460 1440 L2 gleaners , 7700 7720 around. Then when flagship combines came out a lot of 8210,8230, 8240 now everybody wants the biggest to keep up with neighbors 

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6 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Big Bud----

Out of curosity----what is the biggest headers ya'll see operating out your way now???

We see alot of 36 and 40 ft headers running on the big J-D and C-IH machines here in the Mississippi Delta now. (mostly landformed acreage now)

Cutting 2x yield soybeans from the new varieties-----2 x width headers at 2x forward speed from my days back in the 80's with the M-F 750s.  (we just thought we were hitting the bull in the ass with a big axe!!!!):wacko:

All equals lots of trucks on the road in a hurry.  No such thing as a bob truck at the elevator here anymore.

Times have changed in a hurry for this old codger.

 

DD

45ft flex headers are pretty much the norm now no matter what brand and what color of combine.  Course JD now has a few 50 footers floating around with that X9.

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9 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

 3300s are smaller then a 55.

I actually saw a used 3300 at the JD dealer in Hoxie, KS (IIRC) setting next to a 7700, which made it look tiny, and the 7700 was setting next to a 9500, (9600), which made the 7700 look small.

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1 hour ago, Art From Coleman said:

I actually saw a used 3300 at the JD dealer in Hoxie, KS (IIRC) setting next to a 7700, which made it look tiny, and the 7700 was setting next to a 9500, (9600), which made the 7700 look small.

  I know of a 3300 gas sitting at a parts yard.  I don't know what the fate of it will be but the back end is crushed in.  Don't know if that is why it is there or the guy just roughed it (he has done if with other stuff) off of the trailer.  I'm thinking based on the rest of the machine it would have been a good HCOP candidate without the damage.  A lot of stuff just sits OK until the owner dies then the heirs don't care if it goes for scrap or not.  

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7 minutes ago, SDman said:

The biggest heads we normally have around here anymore are 45', regardless of whether they are draper heads for soybeans or corn heads for corn. 

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My neighbor got a 16R30 “Split Flex” Deere cornhead new for this fall. It is impressive.  

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11 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

I actually saw a used 3300 at the JD dealer in Hoxie, KS (IIRC) setting next to a 7700, which made it look tiny, and the 7700 was setting next to a 9500, (9600), which made the 7700 look small.

A 3300 is almost exactly half the size of a 7700.  28 3/4" width vs 55".  Guys out here in MT didn't even know JD made a combine that small.  

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14 hours ago, acem said:

The 715, 4400, small gleaners and small Massey combines were common here years ago. A neighbor ran a gleaner C for decades.

It was easy to make money here back in the 70s. It was hard to make money here in the 80s.

Times change.

Thx-Ace 

Neighbors to the north of us who sold out in the early 90s ended their farming with a C2 Gleaner and gas 7700.  They cut around 2,000 acres.  My uncle worked for them for a short time.  His first job was to put the C2 back together.  When he started on it, you could stand in front of it and look all the way through it.  My cousins ended with the 7700 after the auction.  They thought they were getting a good deal for $3,000.  They overhauled everything on it but it was still a POS.  That combine was so wore out, the grain tank was sagging and rubbing on some of the pulleys.  At the time they were still running a pair of 105s.  They sent the 7700 on its way and ran the 105s for a few more years.  

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