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WW II thoughts?


Lazy WP
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My uncle Ashley Mershon was a US citizen managing a large ranch in  Mexico during the 1940s. He had a German immigrant couple who worked on the ranch.

They had a picture of Hitler and German flags on their wall.

After pearl harbor Ashley told them to take it down and they did.

After the war they found out what the NAZIS did and were ashamed.

Thx-Ace 

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19 hours ago, tinnerjohn said:

My father was drafted in 1942 and given a medical discharge 6 months later. He told me numerous times of feelings of shame, even though he joined the American Legion and served in the honor guard for the burial of at least one KIA during the war, as well as other veterans. I think I can kind of understand, since I never served, fortunately being too young for Viet Nam. I hope 30 years on the VFD helped somewhat to pay my dues, but I still feel like a slacker sometimes!

The aftermath of 9-11 reminded me of the anti German and Japanese feelings that arose overnight.

John

My Uncle on my Mother's side had a nervous breakdown while in England preparing for D-Day and was sent home.  I don't think he ever got over it.  I know the family never really spoke about it much.

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On 9/22/2022 at 3:25 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

Mike, were you familiar with the British Fr47 Seafire fighter plane? A northwest Montana friend of mine has the only one airworthy that I'm aware of. There may be more. He invented the "flowmeter" and doesn't have to work anymore. He has a huge hangar full of old aircraft. He purchased this Seafire in a crate in storage in England. The plane has (I believe?) either a Halifax or a Lancaster bomber engine installed in a Spitfire airframe. It has counter rotating props, to keep it from flipping over when revving it on the ground. The counter rotating props give it a "mushy" sound, rather than the "crack sound" a single prop would give, as on a Spitfire. But it is powerful. It came about by being designed to chase Hitler's jets over the Channel. The war came to an end before they were ever utilized in combat. To make the airplane feel at home, he had 27(?) semi tractors and lowboys bring stones from a Texas Quarry for his private Stonehenge, near his runway and golf course.  Gary   

Fr-47 Seafire.jpg

Seafire fly over.jpg

Seafire over Stonehenge, NW Montana.jpg

Gary.....I had to delve into my Aircraft books ..in answer to your question re the FR 47  Seafire    aircraft.....The last Mk of this particular  aircraft...which was based on the Spitfire but was  a carrier based Aircraft...hence the "Seafire " name....Seems it had a "  Rolls Royce    Griffon ""   engine, with the contra rotating prop, in its final form....and these aircraft were in service untill 1951..

It was the  Hawker  Tempest , in its final form which gave the German V-1   ''doodle bugs'' a real shakeup , in the final months of WW2...by  a big involvement in destroying almost 4000 of the 6,700   V-1   bombs dispatched, of course barrage ballons and anti- aircraft fire played a similar   role in destroying these ''flying bombs'

...the Hawker Typhoon  and Tempests  , were very strongly built..more like the American built Carrier   based Aircraft.....and thus they took a lot of punishment...and came 'home'

I visited three major Aircraft   museums..but did not personally see  an FR47  Aircraft...though I believe there was an example at Duxford....

Old picture of starboard wing damage on a Tempest

Mike

IMG_2204.JPG

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7 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

This man IS good:

 

Art, This fits well with a story my late Brigadier General brother Bill (who was 1/4 Swiss, 1/4 German and all American!) told me, as told to him by an old WWII officer and aviator. There was a squadron of US airmen who were advised of a secret mission they were to fly and bomb. During their briefing, they were told that upon return to the British airfield, they would all be separated and shipped out to other areas and would never see each other again. They were given a designated target, a German munitions factory in forests in Switzerland. It was a night mission and the target was destroyed. Upon landing back in England, the bomber aviators were all flown to different bases from each other. The next day the USA diplomats profusely apologized for the "mistaken" target identity. 

Brother Bill almost felt like he was "talking out of school" as though this deliberate destruction could remain a secret and accident. From this video, it sounds like this sort of thing was quite prolific?  Gary😉

PS: At least Grandma (Regli) Yaeger's hometown of Andermatt, Switzerland wasn't bombed.

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Mistaken Identity, Friendly Fire.......It's been happening for as long as there have been soldiers. I mentioned the "Mighty 8th Air Force"... this man was mentioned as well as some video of him. In the documentary, his death was told a bit differently, but very similar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Preddy

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My Dad and Uncle Al were in the Navy, both as Gunners Mates. Dad in the Atlantic theater, Al in the Pacific. Uncle Al was torpedoed and spent a few hours in the water. Off the United States coast no less, on his eventual way to the Pacific. They wound up meeting midway through the war, on leave, somehow communicating with each other through letters and such. Mom's side fielded Uncle Bruno and a different Uncle Al to the Army, where they fought through D Day and all through Europe. Uncle Al didn't say much, but prayed every day, he said he was trying to repent after having to kill his fellow man. A young member of the Volksturm wouldn't listen to pleas to throw down his weapon and Uncle Al killed him. Papers in his pocket showed he was only 12 years old. It affected him every day. Uncle Bruno saw men freeze to death next to him during the Bulge, had to kill folks, but was seemingly unaffected, and a great husband and father. Didn't ever brag about anything, just would talk, very matter of fact about things if I was interested in it. To him it was a hard job that needed doing. I think most of them felt that way. No bragging. Good solid men, all of them. I miss and revere them all. 

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1 hour ago, Frank H said:

To him it was a hard job that needed doing. I think most of them felt that way. No bragging. Good solid men, all of them.

That seems to be the common theme, when listening to those who saw combat, in any war/conflict, but we hear it again and again, when the WWII veterans tell about their experiences.

And the war was covered by correspondents like Ernie Pyle, who lived with the men, and not one of those correspondents mocked, or condemned those who served, and you had cartoonists, most famously, Bill Mauldin, who, through Willie and Joe, found the humor in the situation, again without mockery (except for some officers and petty regulations), or condemning them for what they had to do.

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On 9/22/2022 at 5:10 PM, Ian Beale said:

Should I add that to the Randy Sohn thread?

I think it belongs there.

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to keep the thread alive

Quote

 During WW2, Canada ran the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, which trained 131,553 air crew, which included 49,507 pilots; more than 70,000 of the 131,553 were Canadian.

 This video is very cool to see a pilot building up to be certified on a Harvard. I would love to know what the pilots on here think about the video and its authenticity/accuracy of the level of skill. The Pilot Maker- apparently jumping to a Spitfire was fairly easy after you conquer a Harvard

  a bonus video

 

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On 9/25/2022 at 12:24 AM, Art From Coleman said:

That seems to be the common theme, when listening to those who saw combat, in any war/conflict, but we hear it again and again, when the WWII veterans tell about their experiences.

And the war was covered by correspondents like Ernie Pyle, who lived with the men, and not one of those correspondents mocked, or condemned those who served, and you had cartoonists, most famously, Bill Mauldin, who, through Willie and Joe, found the humor in the situation, again without mockery (except for some officers and petty regulations), or condemning them for what they had to do.

For a somewhat different look I'd recommend John Steinbeck's "Once there was a war".  Particularly the chapter "Mussolini" on rumours that develop on a troop ship sailing under information silence.

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I don't remember all the details but I think dad made trips back to the west coast between invasions. San Francisco I think?

As a landing craft pilot he was normally aboard troop ships. I guess the troop ships carried his landing craft, I don't know.

He talked about going back to California to get more marines. They stopped at pearl harbor both ways. He complained the fresh marines would puke for the first couple days on the water. He said the head would be swimming in vomit. They got used to it eventually.

They slept in hammocks. He said you always got a top hammock (they were several high). If the top person threw up you got it on you!

They would scrape off good paint and put new back on as busy work. He hated painting and would never consider painting anything unless he built it. The original paint should last its lifetime!

The sailors and marines fought alot. However, if they were around the army boys the sailors and marines would team up on them.

Thx-Ace 

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